Jump to content
  • Sign Up
0
twe0708

Holiday Visitors

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

So my husband said this morning that I should probably put my toaster away so his parents don't contaminate it. I told him there isn't any regular bread in the house so what is there to worry about. He said we don't know what they are bringing. Do you let someone bring regular bread in your house (we do have a contaminated toaster that they could use) and risk getting glutened. My husband said there is probably wheat in the kitchen anyway! :angry: It makes me mad that he thinks this way! So what do others do when they are having overnight visitors (4 nights) and if they bring food in that isn't wheat free?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm right up front with people that my kitchen is gluten free and I will provide all food and snacks. I offer to buy ingredients if they would like to make something with their recipes in my kitchen. I tell them not to bring something they made from home.

I have a gluten free kitchen for health reasons not because I think it is a fun diet. It can take a long time to clean a contaminated kitchen and to have my body recover from an accidental glutening. So no gluten in my kitchen period. Love you all but no gluten here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any bread gets cut outside on a paper plate. No toast. No cooking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a "shared" kitchen. There is a toaster and cutting board that are used for gluten-items on the "dirty dishes" counter, and a cupboard section I can hardly reach anyway that's used for gluten-containing things like oats, granola bars, and boxed cereal.

For us, the only people who every stay with us are my in-laws, and they get it. Even my MIL is good at letting me know if she's contaminated the jam she's used on a sandwich so I know if I can reuse the jam they bought for themselves if they don't finish it before they leave. But, I trust them. Rather, I trust my MIL (she even remembers to use the dedicated stainless steel pan for their morning oatmeal, and a stainless steel spoon), and my FIL doesn't cook and has a large, dedicated-to-him, tray for his cold cereals.

If someone I don't trust is coming over - for the day or for a short stay - I generally ask them not to bring anything, and just go with "gluten free kitchen". There have been a couple exceptions to this (cookies for a holiday party, for instance), but they don't get to go in the kitchen. Most of my friends see me as a little bit paranoid about it, but justifiably so, and are perfectly happy to work with me. Of course, the bonus on their side is that they can just about count on me making food if they're invited to my place. ;) That's the trade-off. If I want my kitchen to stay gluten free, I make the food so I can have the confidence it stays gluten free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a mixed kitchen. Hubby only has limited gluten items though for my sanity. my inlaws spend a few nights a month. Their favorite cereal is on the bottom shelf of the pantry. I make sure that when they come, I hide everything I'm worried about contaminating. MIL has early alzheimer's, so she sometimes puts dirty dishes away. I just have hubby put eveything through the dishwasher when she leaves. The whole kitchen gets a turnover. I also try to encourage her to relax while she is on vacation and that I will do the work for her. It also helps mentally that I consider my whole kitchen and house cross contaminated with the exception of anything in a cupboard, my sheets, and my toothbrush.

Now, when I have lots of guests, I can't watch everyone with large amounts of food, so I ask for grain free dishes if someone feels they must bring a dish to pass.

Oh, for my inlaws, I have everything in the refrigerator labled with stickers gluten or gluten free. That made my FIL ask questions and learn about afccidental CC. Now he gets it and there are 3 of us watching my MIL. Even if there was no gluten in the house, I would consider everything glutened after she left just becauese I don't know if she put lotion on before touching the dishes or settin g the table. But then, I'm paranoid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a shared kitchen as well. My parents are the only people who stay with us and I put my toaster away and keep out the glutened one on the counter just in case my dad has a pre coffee fog. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have evolved into a nearly gluten-free household - the one exception in our kitchen is DH and one DS eat regular bread. We keep it in the frig, they use the gluten-toaster and a gluten-cutting board.

We haven't had any cc issues at home, so I'd vote for giving visitors a gluten bread station (toaster and cutting board).

Show by example that everything else can and is made wonderfully in your home without gluten.

If the visitor isn't familiar with your diet - be clear about the dangers to your health being the reason for your gluten-free kitchen.

Good Luck and Happy & Safe Holidays to you!

-Lisa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm actually having some family in about 2 weeks for a long weekend.

Since it's just me, my house is gluten free, with the exception of dog food :P I know lots of people have mixed households and I want them to feel at home, so I don't mind having to be careful for a few days.

I still have my old toaster and things like that they can use. I'll just put "my" toaster away and have the old one out on the counter.

My plan is to buy some cereal/english muffins/etc.. to have on hand for my non-gluten-free guests. But at the same time, buy them separate milk/butter/etc... for them to use so I don't have to worry about them contaminating my stuff, then I'll just toss it after they leave. I'll probably wash everything by hand before it goes into the dishwasher just to be extra safe.

My guess is breakfast and snacks will be the main things we'll be eating at my house. If we do dinner one night here, it'll probably be easy like steak on the grill with a salad and baked potatoes which is naturally gluten-free anyways!

Honestly, my bigger concern is the eating out while they are here, but it's something I have to figure out how to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a gluten-free kitchen, and guests aren't allowed to bring in gluten, either. I do make sure I have food in the house that my guests like to eat, though. I never eat bread on my own, but I do make it when people visit since they like to eat it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I printed out signs. They're kinda cute - they say "gluten free zone" with a wheat sheath crossed out in a circle and they are on my wall & toaster. I have allocated one small counter in my kitchen for the gluten eaters - on an island I bought specially for it ! I am the cook so I get most of it. Anyway, labelling seems to help and ensure no (little) CC. Literally, the sign is taped to my toaster. My food in the pantry & fridge is on the top shelf & mostly labelled...either gluten-free or "Mom".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is an interesting thread for me. I just can't imagine people coming to my home and staying with me and bringing their own gluteny food, as if they can't live without it or would think that I wouldn't provide a decent meal for them. Maybe I'm the wierd one. And I've never stayed at someone's home where I could just walk in and help myself to the kitchen, or felt like I could anyway. When people come to stay with me I make them meals and they eat what we have. DH has bread occasionally so I will occasionally serve something in the way of bread at breakfast for my gluten eating guests but I put the jam, better etc. in tiny individual dishes or plates with their own serving utensils just for them, that way no CC. The extra gets tossed. On a very few occasions my guests have made sandwiches to take with on the road so I set up a station for them. Otherwise I serve gluten-free meals without the gluten-free substitutes-meat, veg., rice and potatoes instead of pasta for dinner and lunch, fruit for dessert or snack instead of cookies, cake etc. Either no carb for breakfast and a variety of meats, eggs, cheese, fruit, yogurt to choose from. Sometimes I'll set out a gluten-free cereal or two like Chex or the gluten-free rice crispy type. Soup and salad for lunch. I serve my guests but I don't slave all day in the kitchen. I just keep it simple and natural and plan and prep ahead. I generally offer more choices at breakfast and dinner and keep lunch simple, that's what works for me. I figure if you set out a few choices people can pick what they like and be satisfied.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We just had my boy-friend's brother ( age 52?) up north to hunt for a few days. He only brought things he knows we eat and then gave the kids (teens) cash to go to the store for a few things that would be safe for most of us like ice cream and soda. That family shows no signs of being celiacs but have been wonderfully understanding and willing to change their recipes or brands.

We tried a new gluten free stuffing recipe and a Michigan wine (sparkling peach juice from St. Julians for the kids) with our Thanksgiving left overs the first night. The kids made venison stew the second night and BBQ pork the third night. All went well, the hunt was successful, the kids beat the grown ups on WII golf and bowling!

No stress, no gluten. The issue wasn't even really discussed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

×