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Cadbury's Cream Eggs
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So, after six months gluten-free, the DH, brainfog, tiredness and random joint aches were back with a vengence today for my wife.

The only thing my wife has eaten in the past three days that she didn't read the ingredients for was a Cadbury's Creme egg. This is probably one for the brits, but if anyone can tell me if this was the culprit or not I'd be really greatful. I hope this is in the right section.

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They are ok in the US...I eat buckets of the mini-eggs. They are made by Hershey.

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So, after six months gluten-free, the DH, brainfog, tiredness and random joint aches were back with a vengence today for my wife.

The only thing my wife has eaten in the past three days that she didn't read the ingredients for was a Cadbury's Creme egg. This is probably one for the brits, but if anyone can tell me if this was the culprit or not I'd be really greatful. I hope this is in the right section.

I've been eating the caramel ones and according to the ingredient list they are ok, but I've been having some mysterious symptoms. My symptoms had started to subside and last night and today I ate a bunch more, so if I get really sore again in the next few days then I'll know that I can't trust them. Right now I'm aching pretty badly and yesterday (before I ate them again) I had finally started to feel better!! I may also have a cyst on my ovary, because I have them frequently, but since this pain seems a little higher then my normal O pain then it leaves me wondering!! I'd say cut them out and see if she feels better. Maybe we're having a reaction to something else that's in them and not a gluten ingredient. Let us know what happens!!

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Keep in mind that something gluten-free in one country can have gluten in another country. There are at least a few conflicting products in the US vs. Canada, so I'm sure it's the same in the UK vs US.

I found the UK Cadbury site's gluten-absent list. There are several Cadbury Eggs on the list - http://nutrition.cadbury.co.uk/epages/Stor...p;x=17&y=15

This is their statement of what they consider gluten-absent (emphasis mine) -

Gluten absent

These products are suitable for people who suffer from Coeliac disease as they meet the current standard for gluten absent, as set by the international body, Codex Alimentarius. Products which may contain traces of wheat are also excluded from the gluten absent list. The list is also available from www.coeliac.co.uk It also takes into account of the definition for cross contamination.

I'd say that it's probably gluten-free. When they bring up the Codex standards, it always makes my stomach churn because gluten is actually allowed under those standards. BUT, since they also say that they don't include products that may contain traces of wheat on their gluten-free list, it makes me a little nervous. Notice that they say "traces of wheat" not "traces of gluten".

Nancy

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Thatks! Thats been really helpful. She's back on her feet today, so it was nothing too severe. Guess we'll just have to be careful.

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Cadbury eggs are gluten free in the US--even the caramel ones.

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So, after six months gluten-free, the DH, brainfog, tiredness and random joint aches were back with a vengence today for my wife.

The only thing my wife has eaten in the past three days that she didn't read the ingredients for was a Cadbury's Creme egg. This is probably one for the brits, but if anyone can tell me if this was the culprit or not I'd be really greatful. I hope this is in the right section.

Yes, they are gluten-free and it's listed in the Coeliac UK handbook - (has she joined?)

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I'm not in the UK I'm in the US, but if they are gluten free then I am definitely sensitive to something else in them. I just woke up a while ago with this amazing pain in my side. It felt like my entire side was swollen inside. I've been having gas, and It still feels swollen. The only other explanation would be that I had a cyst on my ovary and it burst during the night, but that would not explain the gas. If my bowels are messed up in the next few days then I'll know there is another ingredient that I need to watch out for (I just won't know which ingredient it is)!! Good Luck, and I'm glad she's feeling better today!!

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I'm not in the UK I'm in the US, but if they are gluten free then I am definitely sensitive to something else in them. I just woke up a while ago with this amazing pain in my side. It felt like my entire side was swollen inside. I've been having gas, and It still feels swollen. The only other explanation would be that I had a cyst on my ovary and it burst during the night, but that would not explain the gas. If my bowels are messed up in the next few days then I'll know there is another ingredient that I need to watch out for (I just won't know which ingredient it is)!! Good Luck, and I'm glad she's feeling better today!!

Accidental cross-contamination somehow? We're wondering today if it could be that, since there is nothing else that could be that cause.

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Accidental cross-contamination somehow? We're wondering today if it could be that, since there is nothing else that could be that cause.

Or maybe lactose intolerance??

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Or maybe lactose intolerance??

Nah... ammount of milk cheese and butter we get though there would have been other signs. If eating half a block of cheese doesn't set her off, I'd be surprised if the egg did.

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Hi everyone, I'm new to this forum!

I found this thread while doing a search for Cadbury Creme Eggs, because I checked the ingredients when I was at the grocery store the other day and it now says that they contain wheat. I could swear they used to be gluten free, and I've been eating them all along, so I wanted to know if I was just that stupid or if they changed the ingredients. Based on this thread, I'm guessing they've changed them. So I wanted to give you all a heads up about that! The regular Creme Eggs now have wheat listed right in the ingredient list. Which upsets me greatly because they were my favorite, but I'm glad I checked.

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Regular Size Cadbury Creme Eggs made for the USA by Hersheys now lists GLUCOSE SYRUP (WHEAT) on the back of the box in the ingredients list.

See pics

http://www.daringpress.com/cce1.jpg

http://www.daringpress.com/cce2.jpg

Could definitely buy that for a dollar. I heard on the news that a lot of manufacturers are now including wheat this year because of crop rotation. To keep the land arable, farmers will rotate the crops every year, leaving some fields fallow (devoid of crops), which allows the soil to produce better crops year after year. I heard wheat is big this year :o , but have yet to find more sources confirming this.

Lynn

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This thread is over a year old. This is some of the discussion regarding Cadbury Eggs:

irish daveyboyFeb 17 2008, 01:52 PM

GLUCOSE, GLUCOSE SYRUP AND CARAMEL COLOUR

.

It is important for those following a gluten-free diet to incorporate the latest valid scientific information into their diets. Under current Australian food law,

.

glucose, glucose syrup and caramel colour are "gluten-free",

even if derived from wheat, as the wheat is so highly processed,

there is no gluten detected.

.

Glucose, glucose syrup, caramel and similar ingredients have no detectable gluten, even if derived from wheat.

.

New food labelling laws require food labels to list all ingredients derived from wheat, rye, barley and oats.

This does not mean that all ingredients derived from these sources actually contain gluten.

So, it is a legal requirement that the source be declared, but remember that ingredients derived from wheat that are gluten free are:

dextrose, glucose and caramel colour (additive 150).

.

.

Accuracy of "Gluten-Free" Labels

.

The legal definition of the phrase "gluten-free" varies from country to country. Current research suggests that for persons with celiac disease the maximum safe level of gluten in a finished product is probably less than 0.02% (200 parts per million) and possibly as little as 0.002% (20 parts per million).

Australian standards reserve the "gluten free" label for foods with less than 5 parts per million of gluten, as this is the smallest amount currently detectable.

.

As gluten-containing grains are processed,

more and more of the gluten is removed from them,

as shown in this simple processing flow:

.

Wheat Flour (80,000ppm) > Wheat Starch Codex (200ppm) > Dextrin > Maltodextrin > Glucose Syrup (<5ppm) > Dextrose > Caramel Color

.

Unfortunately, in the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not yet defined the term gluten free as it appears on food labels.

.

It is currently up to the manufacturers of "gluten free" food items to guarantee such a claim.

"A final rule that defines the term gluten-free and identifies the criteria that would enable the food industry to use that term" is scheduled to be released by the FDA on August 2nd, 2008.

.

Many so-called gluten free products have been found to have been contaminated with gluten (such as Pamela's cookies, etc.).

.

Reference

.

United States

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to, ?define the food labeling term ?gluten-free? to mean that a food bearing this claim does not contain any of the following:

An ingredient that is a ?prohibited grain?, which refers to any species of wheat (durum, wheat, spelt wheat, or kamut), rye, barley or their crossbred hybrids

An ingredient that is derived from a ?prohibited grain? and that has not been processed to remove gluten

An ingredient that is derived from a ?prohibited grain? that has been processed to remove gluten,

if the use of the ingredient results in the presence of 20 micrograms or more gluten per gram of food

An ingredient containing 20 micrograms or more gluten per gram of food?

.

Reference

.

It would seem that under present US law sources must be stated ie. Glucose Syrup (from Wheat)

That however doesn't necessarily mean it contains sufficient levels of gluten to be harmful ie. < 5PPM

.

I don't know if this helps to explain the situation, or just makes it more complicated.

.

Best Regards,

David

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I just had one without checking. How the hell wheat gets in a chocolate easter egg is beyond me, living up to my user name now...perhaps it should be pissed off coeliac.

Several places on the net still list them as gluten free. Im located in Australia.

What exactly does trace amounts mean?

Here is the gluten free list for cadbury Australia. On the downside Ive just ate gluten on the good side there is alot more gluten free cadbury stuff than I suspected

http://www.cadbury.com.au/Products/Gluten-Information.aspx

"Note: Fun Filled Freddo – only units containing Tiny Freddo Heads are gluten free, units containing Magic Seeds, Mini Eggs or Bunties contain gluten."

I think this means cream eggs contain gluten, they are no actually specifically listed, and I through the wrapper in the bin and cant check for the wheat thing now

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They are definately NOT gluten free. My fiance and I were so bummed when they clarified that the "syrup" had wheat in it. Sorry guys!

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They are definately NOT gluten free. My fiance and I were so bummed when they clarified that the "syrup" had wheat in it. Sorry guys!

Please read this entire thread (as indicated on page one):

Glucose, glucose syrup, caramel and similar ingredients have no detectable gluten, even if derived from wheat.

.

New food labelling laws require food labels to list all ingredients derived from wheat, rye, barley and oats.

This does not mean that all ingredients derived from these sources actually contain gluten.

So, it is a legal requirement that the source be declared, but remember that ingredients derived from wheat that are gluten free are:

dextrose, glucose and caramel colour (additive 150).

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I have to say that before eating the dreaded Cadbury Creme Egg, I used the the messages on this thread to make my decision. I don't recommend eating the Cadbury Creme Egg. Though much beloved and my favorite Easter treat, it lead to the worst gluten reaction I have had to date. I tried reading the label to no avail (crinkled foil is unintelligible). But I checked one of the other creme eggs and it was right there in the ingredients "Glucose Syrup (WHEAT)". I don't know if these were UK or US (they were purchased in the US, so I'm guessing US), but they were definitely bad for me.

Verdict: will not eat Cadbury Creme Eggs anymore

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I ate a three pack all in one day and had no problem except being "full" from being a gluttun. :lol:

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I ate a three pack all in one day and had no problem except being "full" from being a gluttun. :lol:

I would eat them, if I could get past the vision that they look like a raw egg. Yuck!

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Oh! I had a thought about these. It may be that cadbury's has slightly different formulae for these, depending on the country.

So if the ones in the US are safe to eat, that might not hold true for UK, Australia or Canada. It is easy to forget we are a multinational group here and that many companies are multi-national too.

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This was in the Winter 2009 GIG newsletter.

http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/18710436?prt=true

Clinical trial: gluten microchallenge with wheat-based starch hydrolysates in coeliac disease patients - a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate safety.

Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2008; 28(10):1240-8 (ISSN: 1365-2036)

Kaukinen K ; Salmi T ; Collin P ; Huhtala H ; K

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This was in the Winter 2009 GIG newsletter.

http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/18710436?prt=true

____________________

While from a strictly "scientific" standpoint this might have some validity, I will continue to protest the fact that it is not a long term study done over several decades and generations to follow the results, and it is still being done as rationalizing a way for food manufacturers to continue to contaminate all processed foods WITH THE WHEAT FAMILY of grain products and then turn around and say it is not harmful to the celiac and gluten intolerant.

You may want to think about just where this process is going to end up. I have. The LAST thing I want to see in this country is a sloppy standard for food labeling and foods that are routinely full of ultra processed wheat product being declared "gluten free."

On the other parts of the this forum we routinely have people consuming small amounts of gluten contaminated food daily, thinking that it is harmless while concurrently complaining how sick that they feel. We also have people, for the most part, encouraging them to stop deliberately consuming gluten so that they will feel better.

To say that the average person is going to be able to make the distinction between the two concepts is wishful thinking. In other words, this seems to be a subtle trend to encourage consumption of items that contain processed wheat by the gluten intolerant.

To be gluten free, you start with a gluten free product. You don't start with wheat and then keep rendering it until it is supposedly "almost" free of the wheat protein and declare that should be "good enough." There is absolutely no reason whatsoever to do this unless there is a surplus of otherwise useless wheat byproduct in search of a manufacturer looking for a cheap ingredient. There is enough regular food in the world to foist this stuff off on them, there is no reason to look forward to this stuff starting to show up in supposedly gluten free foods.

This is also a food and drug medication safety issue as it is my opinion that some manufacturers will continue to balk at, and come up with many devious ways to disguise the fact that they don't know where some of their ingredients come from, and that they don't really care unless there is a problem after the fact and they get caught.

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