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Rusla

Anyone Gone Raw?

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Just get good quality meat (beef) or fish and eat it raw!

You shoudn't eat raw pork unless its cured longer than trychinacia can gestate.

I also don't see why you can't cheat and have seared tuna or seared beef with just the outside cooked.

I also second the Fit for Life (though the style rubs me up)

Seriously its just cultural....

I eat raw meat and eggs all summer, its the safest bet in Paris from a gluten standpoint.

I was really really anti-raw anything .. seriously and the first time i ate sushi I gagged the whole time and the same with steak tartare (which has raw egg and beef)

Not long ago I was at a resto with friends (half anglophone and half francophone) and ordered beef carpaccio starter and steak tartare main course...

The Americans at the table next to me looked HORRIFIED as I tucked into the carpaccio.... and not knowing we spoke English started commenting and I joked about what they would say when I got my main course (In French).

As it happened they paid up early after making some very offensive comments about the French being like animals and dirty ..

Guess what... noone ever gets sick of fresh organic beef or eggs... either in France, Italy or Spain and indeed they live longer and have lower infant mortality. (As do the Japanese who eat a lot of raw fish)

I understand your UGGHGH factor .... but honestly its cultural and the fact the UK and US has a dominance of factory farms...

Organic is more common in France than non for meat and eggs (I have a choice of probably 10 types of eggs at the local minimart and probably 7 are organic free range and divided by breed of hen) and the three that are not are just "eggs"....

The same with Beef..nearly all beef is organic and has a certificate and you can trace it back to the individual cow and farm and the cows parents... Yes.. its more expensive than US beef.... but Im sure you can get decent beef in the US... I certainly had good beef just over the border in Southern Alberta where my friends father runs an organic farm.

You made me hungry with the tuna statement Oh and you are so right. We as Americans want money so we spray our foods to kill the bugs. I wonder does anyone think if it kills the bug what does it really do to us. We want the money. after all we are Americans.

Why aren't the other countriesas sick as we are?

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About four weeks ago, it was pointed out to me that I haven't eaten a single cooked food in about nine months. I'm raw by default. This is the best I have felt since diagnosis.

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You made me hungry with the tuna statement Oh and you are so right. We as Americans want money so we spray our foods to kill the bugs. I wonder does anyone think if it kills the bug what does it really do to us. We want the money. after all we are Americans.

Why aren't the other countriesas sick as we are?

They could just as easily have been British and my table happened to have two Americans on it (my girlfriend and another friend) and the UK is fast approaching the same levels and types of sickness that characterise the US ... i.e. diseases of a rich developed nation.

Its pretty scary if you look at health metrics....because many low-tech nations (not really 3rd world but not developed) have much better life expectancy and infant mortality.

I do have a theory but I think its a bit "conspiracy" but not really conspiracy.

Basically I think we are trained to eat what is easiest to produce, store and transport in bulk.

Of course marketing and advertising play a huge part but I think it goes beyond this.

Firstly economics has shut out the small producers, its cheaper to mass produce and the efficiency increases as you own the whole chain from growing through transport and distribution.

The competition is virtually non existant..and what there is is between big name brands and mostly over cost not quality. Living in France gives me a different perspective since the French like to preserve their "traditional" way of life and protect small farmers and producers though this itself is falling due to restrictions placed on protectionism.

Just stop and think at this point for a minute... sure we were all taught protectionism is BAD... and that the market can decide but its this what we really want for food! Do we want the most efficiently produced food of the lowest acceptable quality? This isn't cheap access to furniture or automobiles it is what we put in our bodies.

Even more sinister is lobbying....what makes this so bad for me in relation to food is the need to drag everything down to the lowest common denominator. So when mass produced food has health risks (like battery eggs) legislation is brought in but this legislation applies also to the free range chicks... the same for pasturisation of milk, instead of guaranteeing the herd doesn't have TB its cheaper to process ALL milk. When like in the UK cows are being fed a feed based on dead cows (amongst other stuff) and pumped with antibiotics the measures taken against this are applied against small farmers who have taken great pains to organically feed their herd of 50 and know them all by name.

I was watching a TV show the other day where the mother comes in for the "family dinner" she has demanded everyone attend and I'm thinking wow what a great kitchen, then she pulls a ready meal out of a bag.

I dunno, I posted some WHO figures the other week showing life expectancy from 1960-2000 in different countires and on the whole those that were doing best in 1960 have barely improved today whereas some of the 1960 lower figures have vastly overtaken the over-developed world. With all the advances in medicine places like the UK and US have dropped steadily in rank and increased life expectancy a tiny amount whereas countires in the carabean have overtaken and left us standing and France, Italy and Spain etc. (what I call food culture latin countires) are still way ahead...

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I went to a raw, vegan, gluten-free/dairy-free restaurant a few weeks ago and... Wow, I got SO sick. My friend, who doesn't have food allergies, got sick too. We both spent the afternoon in the bathroom.

That may not be too surprising if your system isn't used to it. It takes time for the digestive system to develop the proper enzyme balances and so forth. There are a number of other factors too, but basically I wouldn't recommend switching between raw and cooked all at once. Just like you wouldn't expect to compete in a marathon without proper training for awhile beforehand. Body builders also know that they could actually have a heart attack if they were to suddenly stop all their intense training and workouts. Either way it's a shock to the system when it's not prepared.

I understand your UGGHGH factor .... but honestly its cultural and the fact the UK and US has a dominance of factory farms...

Organic is more common in France than non for meat and eggs (I have a choice of probably 10 types of eggs at the local minimart and probably 7 are organic free range and divided by breed of hen) and the three that are not are just "eggs"....

The same with Beef..nearly all beef is organic and has a certificate and you can trace it back to the individual cow and farm and the cows parents... Yes.. its more expensive than US beef.... but Im sure you can get decent beef in the US... I certainly had good beef just over the border in Southern Alberta where my friends father runs an organic farm.

I do agree it's cultural. That same person I mentioned grew up by the sea, and was comfortable with diving for oysters, splitting them open and slurping down the contents right there on the beach!

I'd say you are fortunate to have such certified organic stuff. We don't have much of that here, and a lot of the meat at the supermarkets (at least around here) are borderline spoiling. You can often see the shiny mucus that forms from the overgrowth of bacteria. Many stores also hide older meat by repackaging it with a bit of fresher meat over it. They'll do anything to make a buck. Then when you get it home and start using it, you find old, gray, slimy meat underneath. There are stores beginning to carry more organic meats, but not many, and the price is so steep most people can't afford it. Fish is even worse. There was one place run by actual fishermen that only sold fish one day per week when they hauled in their nets and the fish was actually caught that very morning. I don't know if they are still in business, but you couldn't find a parking space near the store on Friday's. That was the only time when I actually smelled and tasted fresh fish. It doesn't stink when it's fresh, but the stuff in the supermarkets always wreaks.

I suppose the market change will be very gradual. I don't go in for the standard American diet, but meat is one of those things I'd never eat raw. Especially not the horrid stuff being sold around here. There is at least one local farm selling something that is supposed to be better than the factory-fed junk, but not eating any meat for awhile I haven't investigated it.

I just heard on the news that spinach was found to be contaminated with e coli, and they suggested not eating it at all, but return it. Sounded like a nation-wide thing too.

Anyway, here are some interesting articles on raw/cooked foods, and the human digestive system:

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=34

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=faq&dbid=16

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=faq&dbid=42

Americans are in poor health for a variety of reasons. They typically eat only what I refer to as "pleasure foods". That is; foods eaten only because they taste good, with no consideration for a healthy diet. It's amazing how we can hear about diet and lifestyle being so important for good health, yet when the typical American feels ill, they run to the doctor for a quick-fix pill, as if not taking drugs was the cause of their problems. If the doctor suggests dietary changes, they usually resist. They don't want to change. They'd rather cover up the symptoms with drugs. In the area I'm in, drunkenness is a weekly routine thing. People pack the bars just to get pickled every Friday night. They actually want to get drunk.

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That may not be too surprising if your system isn't used to it. It takes time for the digestive system to develop the proper enzyme balances and so forth. There are a number of other factors too, but basically I wouldn't recommend switching between raw and cooked all at once. Just like you wouldn't expect to compete in a marathon without proper training for awhile beforehand. Body builders also know that they could actually have a heart attack if they were to suddenly stop all their intense training and workouts. Either way it's a shock to the system when it's not prepared.

I agree on this... but I think a mix of raw and cooked (some items like rice obviously need cooking) is probably best.

I do agree it's cultural. That same person I mentioned grew up by the sea, and was comfortable with diving for oysters, splitting them open and slurping down the contents right there on the beach!

Yeah, the first raw food I ever ate was peer pressure from Scallop divers ....I thought I was going to throw...

I'd say you are fortunate to have such certified organic stuff.
Well I made a lifestyle choice. I have lived all round the world and France is actually closest to my native UK I have been in years but I have to say the fresh food is a large factor....

We don't have much of that here, and a lot of the meat at the supermarkets (at least around here) are borderline spoiling. You can often see the shiny mucus that forms from the overgrowth of bacteria. Many stores also hide older meat by repackaging it with a bit of fresher meat over it. They'll do anything to make a buck. Then when you get it home and start using it, you find old, gray, slimy meat underneath. There are stores beginning to carry more organic meats, but not many, and the price is so steep most people can't afford it. Fish is even worse. There was one place run by actual fishermen that only sold fish one day per week when they hauled in their nets and the fish was actually caught that very morning. I don't know if they are still in business, but you couldn't find a parking space near the store on Friday's. That was the only time when I actually smelled and tasted fresh fish. It doesn't stink when it's fresh, but the stuff in the supermarkets always wreaks.

Yep, I know and I make every effort to pay more and eat less meat.

I'd rather have half as much organic and certified than buy at a supermarket ... but unfortunatleymany people don't so the traditional butchers are being squeezed out.

When I lived in Oslo you could get Fresh fish right off the docks and I used to go down and find myself surrounded by 90% immigrants... and loads of Norwegains buying from supermarkets (go figure?)

I suppose the market change will be very gradual. I don't go in for the standard American diet, but meat is one of those things I'd never eat raw. Especially not the horrid stuff being sold around here. There is at least one local farm selling something that is supposed to be better than the factory-fed junk, but not eating any meat for awhile I haven't investigated it.

You sound just like me.... 5 years or so ago.

When I first came to France I was still buying meat in supermarkets...I'd never touch that raw even now!

I come from a part of England where meat is considered dead once its black inside... seriously.

Fresh fish is what you get from a newly opened tin!

In the area I'm in, drunkenness is a weekly routine thing. People pack the bars just to get pickled every Friday night. They actually want to get drunk.

Yeah... I have lived in a few places (Aberdeen, Oslo and Stavanger) particualrly where people actually say "lets go and get smashed", don't get me wrong I like a drink but I don't go out with the purpose of getting drunk!

Sometimes it happens ... I have a few but never on purpose....

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I do have a theory but I think its a bit "conspiracy" but not really conspiracy.

Basically I think we are trained to eat what is easiest to produce, store and transport in bulk.

Of course marketing and advertising play a huge part but I think it goes beyond this.

Firstly economics has shut out the small producers, its cheaper to mass produce and the efficiency increases as you own the whole chain from growing through transport and distribution.

The competition is virtually non existant..and what there is is between big name brands and mostly over cost not quality. Living in France gives me a different perspective since the French like to preserve their "traditional" way of life and protect small farmers and producers though this itself is falling due to restrictions placed on protectionism.

Just stop and think at this point for a minute... sure we were all taught protectionism is BAD... and that the market can decide but its this what we really want for food! Do we want the most efficiently produced food of the lowest acceptable quality? This isn't cheap access to furniture or automobiles it is what we put in our bodies.

I was watching a TV show the other day where the mother comes in for the "family dinner" she has demanded everyone attend and I'm thinking wow what a great kitchen, then she pulls a ready meal out of a bag.

I've always heard that in France people have a different 'mind set' about life in general. I can only speak for what I see in America is its mostly all about the earning big incomes, having a more square feet in their homes with three stall garages, and just working too much. It leaves little time to prepare decent meals much less finding farmers that they can buy eggs and meat from. Besides it costs to much. I'm the only one I know that spends alot of money at the grocery store. Junk food is cheap and fast food is quick and that fits into the American way.

I loved watching Nigella's (sp) cooking show on the food channel here, although they have cancelled it now for about 2 yrs but I heard its coming back. She taught me how preparing food is every bit worth taking the time to buy the best quality and finding those eggs from farmers taking the time to roast a good quality cut of organic meat in the oven, choosing fresh organic grown vegetable and cooking with passion. I feel its a lost art and I'm sadden by it.

I also read the why french women don't get fat book that was a best seller in the US. That book says it all. We do have major anxieties about food. We are either binging or dieting and food is our enemy. I know few people who enjoy wine with their meals, and that to me goes along with the mind set that the meal is a time of celebration, a time to relax from your busy day, a time to enjoy family and friends and good conversation. Most people I know watch t.v. while they eat.

There was a segment on t.v on how the servings of food in America has changed in the last 20 yrs. They showed a cheeseburger in the 1980's and one you order now. The size is almost twice as big. What is going on!

Oh well enough ranting.

Gail

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There was a segment on t.v on how the servings of food in America has changed in the last 20 yrs. They showed a cheeseburger in the 1980's and one you order now. The size is almost twice as big. What is going on!

Yep. Throw in more chemicals and artificial junk to make it more addicting too. Add to that the fact that servings of vegetables and fruit keep getting smaller. Americans are both overfed and malnourished.

I hope I'm not the only one who notices how the "diet food" industry has expanded at the same time as the "modern day diseases" have proliferated. It's no coincidence. I keep wondering when people are going to figure out that the food they eat is a considerable part of the problem. For instance, it has been known since the seventies that MSG causes obesity and diabetes, yet more prepackaged foods contain it today than ever before - especially "diet" foods! Americans are more aware of MSG than they used to be, so the companies who do it usually use various techniques to get it into the products in such a way that its true identity won't show on the label. Sadly, gluten-free products are also being made this way.

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I'd say you are fortunate to have such certified organic stuff. We don't have much of that here, and a lot of the meat at the supermarkets (at least around here) are borderline spoiling. You can often see the shiny mucus that forms from the overgrowth of bacteria. Many stores also hide older meat by repackaging it with a bit of fresher meat over it. They'll do anything to make a buck. Then when you get it home and start using it, you find old, gray, slimy meat underneath. There are stores beginning to carry more organic meats, but not many, and the price is so steep most people can't afford it. Fish is even worse. There was one place run by actual fishermen that only sold fish one day per week when they hauled in their nets and the fish was actually caught that very morning. I don't know if they are still in business, but you couldn't find a parking space near the store on Friday's. That was the only time when I actually smelled and tasted fresh fish. It doesn't stink when it's fresh, but the stuff in the supermarkets always wreaks.

If you found a supermarket that was truly doing this, you should turn them in, as it would be completely illegal and the store could be shut down. I think the issue here is that ground meat will turn gray on the inside as it ages, while exposure to oxygen in the air causes the outside to stay red or even get a little bit more red. You can test this by buying a small pack of meat, holding it for a week and then breaking it open to see the interior.

In any case, I've bought loads of meat in my life, and it would look structurally different if they had put a layer on top to hide what's underneath.

I also read the why french women don't get fat book that was a best seller in the US. That book says it all. We do have major anxieties about food. We are either binging or dieting and food is our enemy. I know few people who enjoy wine with their meals, and that to me goes along with the mind set that the meal is a time of celebration, a time to relax from your busy day, a time to enjoy family and friends and good conversation. Most people I know watch t.v. while they eat.

There was a segment on t.v on how the servings of food in America has changed in the last 20 yrs. They showed a cheeseburger in the 1980's and one you order now. The size is almost twice as big. What is going on!

Oh well enough ranting.

Gail

There are a lot of differences between the typcial American lifestyle/diet and the French. There are also a great many changes that have happened to the American lifestyle/diet in the past generation that could at least partially account for the ballooning of Americans.

For instance, French households do not have vast quantities of processed snack foods that family members munch on constantly. Americans formerly did not, but now they do. High fructose corn syrup has gone from zero to a substantial part of the American diet in this time. Americans now drink mostly high calorie sweetened drinks. They avoid "high fat" protein foods, while packing down "fat-free" and full fat carbohydrate foods. Wheat consumption is way up. The list goes on and on.

I think portion size may be a major factor for people who eat out a lot or all the time, but less so for people who eat at home, where the constant access to junk food and drinks is probably more of an issue.

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If you found a supermarket that was truly doing this, you should turn them in, as it would be completely illegal and the store could be shut down. I think the issue here is that ground meat will turn gray on the inside as it ages, while exposure to oxygen in the air causes the outside to stay red or even get a little bit more red. You can test this by buying a small pack of meat, holding it for a week and then breaking it open to see the interior.

In any case, I've bought loads of meat in my life, and it would look structurally different if they had put a layer on top to hide what's underneath.

Oh? I never noticed fresh meat turning like that on the inside, but then I never kept it a week either! The suggestions I've heard are that even cooked meat shouldn't be kept more than four days. Fresh is like two days or something unless it's frozen, though it has been awhile since I have purchased or eaten any. I think I recall seeing some meat get forgotten about on a few occasions, but ATM I only remember the slimy part, and of course the smell. You may be correct. But in any case when you open a package that was just purchased and it looks like that or has a definite bad odor, there's something not to be trusted.

As for the structural thing, yes I've actually seen that, which was part of the tipoff. Sometimes there'd be a "marbled" effect to it, like the old package was partly blended with some fresher stuff. At times there'd also appear to be more red liquid (blood?) purposely added, like as if to try and color it up. Heck, maybe these things are part of why I turned away from eating meats.

After going into a rant about the beef industry here I decided not to post that part, as it seemed a bit too far off-topic.

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Riceguy, I know what you mean, I grew up on game because my step-father is a hunter. I could hardly stomach the meat at the grocery for years! Now I eat it again, but I buy a lot of buffalo and ostrich or other different meats. I also buy all my meat at Wild Oats -- seems better than Kroger's. I found I needed more meat after eating mostly vegetarian for several years.

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If you found a supermarket that was truly doing this, you should turn them in, as it would be completely illegal and the store could be shut down. I think the issue here is that ground meat will turn gray on the inside as it ages, while exposure to oxygen in the air causes the outside to stay red or even get a little bit more red. You can test this by buying a small pack of meat, holding it for a week and then breaking it open to see the interior.

Exposure to oxygen causes the meat to brown, whereas exposure to carbon monoxide keeps it bright red even when it's spoiling. There was a news article not long ago about the packaged meats at Walmart & other retailers. Ground beef is prepackaged with carbon monoxide pumped into the packaging, keeping the meat looking vibrant red for a long time, thus giving customers the false impression that the meat was still fresh. Check out this article: http://www.local6.com/news/9220774/detail.html

Michelle

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Anyway, here are some interesting articles on raw/cooked foods, and the human digestive system:

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=34

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=faq&dbid=16

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=faq&dbid=42

Thanks for the sites :)

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Looks like a great site, Lee. Thanks. I'll have to study it later. And, from what I saw in the recipe list, there should be something there for everyone - and their food allergies! :)

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Well I went to my first raw uncooking class. The woman who taught it has be totally raw for 19 years and she went that way after they said she had lupus. Well she there are no signs or lupus or arthritis which she had then. She looks totally healthy and she doesn't eat beans or tofu. She uses lots of green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds and avacados.

To keep foods in the raw category they warm them or dehydrate them in a dehydrator for things like soups etc. The mean was fantastic and we had all sorts of good stuff that was not cooked.

There were others there who were not totally raw and some who were they said they had more energy, needed less sleep and for one woman who went raw a few months ago and has lost 60 lbs.

What I like about raw is that everything still has a wonderful vibrant color, it tastes good, I have no labels I need to read and it is healthy. I may never be totally raw but I am willing to give it a fair shake. After all I went cold turkey from gluten because of feeling sick and the damage it does. I am more than willing to go raw for awhile. They say the more raw food you eat the better it is for you. You don't have to be totally raw it is a personal thing

but all who were there said it is not that hard and they feel good.

The woman giving the class her mother who is in her 80's was there and went raw about ten years ago and she is as fit as a fiddle. If anyone wants some recipes I can post them in recipes or you can PM me.

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Well I went to my first raw uncooking class. The woman who taught it has be totally raw for 19 years and she went that way after they said she had lupus. Well she there are no signs or lupus or arthritis which she had then. She looks totally healthy and she doesn't eat beans or tofu. She uses lots of green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds and avacados.

To keep foods in the raw category they warm them or dehydrate them in a dehydrator for things like soups etc. The mean was fantastic and we had all sorts of good stuff that was not cooked.

There were others there who were not totally raw and some who were they said they had more energy, needed less sleep and for one woman who went raw a few months ago and has lost 60 lbs.

What I like about raw is that everything still has a wonderful vibrant color, it tastes good, I have no labels I need to read and it is healthy. I may never be totally raw but I am willing to give it a fair shake. After all I went cold turkey from gluten because of feeling sick and the damage it does. I am more than willing to go raw for awhile. They say the more raw food you eat the better it is for you. You don't have to be totally raw it is a personal thing

but all who were there said it is not that hard and they feel good.

The woman giving the class her mother who is in her 80's was there and went raw about ten years ago and she is as fit as a fiddle. If anyone wants some recipes I can post them in recipes or you can PM me.

I love the idea of raw, but I can only slowly add back in things raw at this point. I'm hoping I can train my system and develop the right enzymes eventually. Brown is not necessarily bad for meat. My Greek grandfather who ran a highly successful butcher shop in the U.S. used to "age" the meat. Indeed, in Greece an American might be horrified to go to market and see the great racks of beef, pork... hanging in the hot, hot sun, flies and insects willy-nilly doing what they do... The problem is the way we are farming cattle today. One could hardly call it "farming". "Torture" might be more apt. Read "The Omnivore's Dilemma", Michael Pollan for an unflinching look at what the U.S. has not so insidiously done to farmers and farming in this country. I haven't given up on adding more raw- have a wonderful cookbook, but slow and steady if at all.

lisa

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Exposure to oxygen causes the meat to brown, whereas exposure to carbon monoxide keeps it bright red even when it's spoiling. There was a news article not long ago about the packaged meats at Walmart & other retailers. Ground beef is prepackaged with carbon monoxide pumped into the packaging, keeping the meat looking vibrant red for a long time, thus giving customers the false impression that the meat was still fresh. Check out this article: http://www.local6.com/news/9220774/detail.html

Michelle

My husband has told me (he works with meat packers) that the meat packers sometimes use red jello for coloring ... I would think they would have to label that though, so don't know if they still do that ... he's been doing this job for 15 years, so that was probably before the new labelling laws.

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I love the idea of raw, but I can only slowly add back in things raw at this point. I'm hoping I can train my system and develop the right enzymes eventually. Brown is not necessarily bad for meat. My Greek grandfather who ran a highly successful butcher shop in the U.S. used to "age" the meat. Indeed, in Greece an American might be horrified to go to market and see the great racks of beef, pork... hanging in the hot, hot sun, flies and insects willy-nilly doing what they do... The problem is the way we are farming cattle today. One could hardly call it "farming". "Torture" might be more apt. Read "The Omnivore's Dilemma", Michael Pollan for an unflinching look at what the U.S. has not so insidiously done to farmers and farming in this country. I haven't given up on adding more raw- have a wonderful cookbook, but slow and steady if at all.

lisa

I was kind of shocked when I went to Mexico because none of the meat is refridgerated (at the mercado or market). The thing is that all the meat is fresh. It is also kind of cool in that section of the market. Another thing is that the eggs aren't in the refridgerator section. They just have them sitting on a shelf (and this is at a big grocery store).

I have heard from a butcher that dates are sometimes changed on packages of meat. I have also heard that old meat is mixed in new meat to make ground beef. After I heard that I don't really buy ground beef any more. I try to use ground turkey instead. Pretty much all raw meat grosses me out (especially chicken and pork). My husband thinks I am crazy because I always smell the meat before I cook it. For some reason chicken always smells bad to me. I wish we could buy all of our meat from Whole Foods, but we can't afford it right now. Once I graduate from school and start working, we will have a bigger budget for groceries.

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I was kind of shocked when I went to Mexico because none of the meat is refridgerated (at the mercado or market). The thing is that all the meat is fresh. It is also kind of cool in that section of the market. Another thing is that the eggs aren't in the refridgerator section. They just have them sitting on a shelf (and this is at a big grocery store).

It is actually best not to refrigerate fresh eggs (apparently it changes the taste)...if you were to collecct them fresh on the farm, you'd keep them unrefrigerated and use them up quickly. Unfortunately, given that eggs need to sit for extended periods before we purchase them from the grocery store, they need to be refrigerated for health & safety.

Michelle

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