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I Need To Lose Weight

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Could I get a couple of you to give me some meal ideas for weight loss. I spent the first part of the year eating sugared cereals (gluten free) and eating Rice Dream Ice Cream, I've put on about ten pounds. I need to loose ten-20 pounds and I have no idea how. I quit eating the sugared cereals and the rice dream ice cream. I find it very difficult to get creative in cooking, so we eat meat and potatoes, and I am so tired of potatoes, but that is what my husband wants, and he needs to loose about 50 pounds. As we get older we are working harder in our jobs, but we are not energetic enough to go beyond that in exercise. And now that it is holiday time, I get so moody cause we don't get any invitations to parties any more and I just get so depressed I don't know what to do. So that is about it, moody and depressed and I don't know what to do. I also bought a bunch of gluten free crap that cost me an arm and a leg. I'm never hungry and I don't eat enough to keep me going, so my body is probably in starvation mode most of the time, cause I am so out of it right now.

Do the fat free dressings etc really help? I eat Kraft thousand island, but I haven't been getting the fat free kind. Is the fat free kind gluten free also?

I drink that Vance's dairy free milk, and that is full of potato flour and weight gaining grains, so maybe I should quit that too. Maybe I should just quit everything that is good. I am just not in a good spirit right now, thanks for listening, and sorry I got off topic.

Bernadette


Montana

Self-diagnosed after many tests and no results to feel better

Gluten Free since 8-6-2005

Lactose free for many years

Casein Free since 02/14/06

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Bernadette, years ago pre-gluten intolerance I was about 20 pounds overweight. I tried every fad diet, but they don't work .... you take the weight off, then go back to your old habits and gain it back, only instead of gaining muscle and fat like what you lost, you just gain fat and end up worse off.

To lose I changed my eating habits. At dinnertime I would put my salad on my plate instead of in a bowl, this left less room for my food! I ate veggies and meat. I would say carbs are fine, but no more than 1 cup at a meal.

For lunch, eat the same as dinner if you can.

Breakfast, how about eggs and a piece or two of gluten-free toast?

I also exercised. It took a year, but my eating habits were changed and I NEVER gained it back! Avoid fried foods. Drink water.

Make everything you eat count ... don't eat garbage. If you're really craving something like ice cream, try to put it off till Sunday, many times by the time Sunday comes around you don't really want it. If you do, eat it before or instead of a meal so that it's not just an addition to your daily calories.

I never worried about salad dressings, etc. Now I make my own salad dressing -- olive oil, lemon juice, maple syrup, garlic, mustard. I don't measure.

Another trick is to not deny yourself so much that you go on a binge. Like I said, wait till a certain designated day of the week (it keeps you from turning every day into treat day) and eat what you want, but not freely all day long!


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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I've been having very good results with the South Beach Diet. It's much like what Carla said: lots of veggies and lean meats, good fats like olive oil, and smaller portions of fruit and whole grain carbs - which of course for me means things like brown rice, quinoa, etc. Despite the name, I don't really think of it as a "diet," in that I don't feel deprived at all. I have lost about 15 pounds since May, but I plan to keep eating this way for good, because I just feel so much healthier!

Jeanne

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I feel for you :) And I've been there!

Some tips from a successful loser! Hope they help:

Don't eat/buy fat-free anything, ever. Ever. Fat is not the problem. Fat does not make you fat (unless it is being consumed with high levels of sgar/carbs) Do not be afraid of natural fats like butter (if tolerated - if not, ghee is great), lard, tallow, and veg. oils like coconut and palm oil, and olive oil (but not for heating - salads or a very light saute as it's not heat stable). Natural fats keep you sated (feeling full) and it is extremely hard to overeat them (unless they're coming to you in the form of cake/cookies/chips!)

Carbs. Yeah yeah, a lot has been said about this esp. in the mainstream media. Do your own research. To put it simply though, all carbs are broken down into glucose, regardless. Keeping carb levels low is a good idea - instead of potatoes with your meat, try some non-starchy veggies (I like green beans cooked in white wine and garlic, or veggies like onion, fennel, tomato etc doused in olive oil and roasted in the oven)

Base meals around protein. Instead of cereal for brekkie, do eggs (if tolerated) or have leftover dinner. We're one of few cultures that has specific "breakfast" foods - break out!

Go easy on fruit. Chuck the gluten-free substitutes, or most of them. Focus on whole rather than processed foods. Meat, veggies, nuts. Since going gluten-free, I've noticed that there's a ton of junkfood out there that's legal - but it's still junk food.

Some resources for you, so you can do your own research and make up your own mind (since I am just some person on the internet, and why should you listen to me?)

www.lowcarb.ca (a forum - great people, lots of articles, lots of advice...and a wide range of experiences to read about and learn from)

www.breadandmoney.com (inspirational story - I bought his book, and it's amazing what just returning to a natural real-food diet can do)

www.proteinpower.com/drmike (his blog, really good stuff though I don't follow his eating plan)

www.paleodiet.com (great recipes here, all gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free etc)

www.second-opinions.co.uk (great info, cheap downloadable e-book if you want as well)

www.westonaprice.org (THE place to go for info on real food, based on REAL research and empirical data. Be warned - you could spend days here)

PS: a nice treat, for when you need a little something, is almond milk and cocoa. Almond milk goes foamy on top when microwaved. Add a little honey or stevia (or AS of choice, if you do those) if you want. Some vanilla is nice too, or a pinch of cayenne if you wanna make like an Aztec! You can get sweetened or unsweetened Almond Breeze (it comes in flavours too, but these are really high in sugar)

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Totally agree with Waywardsister. *wave*

Fat isn't the issue, calories from unrefined carbs and starches are the problem. Fat makes you feel full and keeps you feeling full while carbs make your blood sugar bounce up high, which releases insulin and makes it plummet. That drop in blood sugar makes you hungry again.

Eat plenty of protein at every meal. Have eggs or sausage or something like that for breakfast and you'll not find yourself hungry again for many hours. Same thing at lunch. Eat plenty of non-starchy veggies like leafy greens or broccoli, turnips, winter squash, zucchini. Avoid potatoes, they're worse than sugar for blood sugar.

For one meal a day I usually have something like a big salad with hard boiled egg crumbled into it, chicken breast, whatever veggies look appealing. Then I top it with olive oil and good vinegar, but any dressing is fine, as long as it isn't sugar laden (or contains wheat).

For snacks I'd recommend nuts, as long as you can control yourself on them. :) One or two oz at most. They're very filling and super healthy.

For diet plans, there's a zillion I could recommend. I think Dr. Eades Protein Power life plan is good. I love the guys blog! http://proteinpower.com

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Portion sizes are really important. You can much sure that everything you eat is low-fat, but if you are eating too much of it then you are always going to put on weight. Also, stay away from fad diets. You might lose weight whilst you are on them, but as soon as you go off them the weight comes straight back on and then brings its friends over.

Make sure you are getting some daily exercise as well. Invest in a pedometer and make sure you are doing at least 10,000 steps (walking steps, not stairs). It is a really easy way in to increasing your exercise. Also it is fun and you and your husband can "compete" to see who can do the most steps in one day.

Best of luck. Losing weight can be really hard and de-motivating at times, but the end result is worth it.

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Bernadette--

What, are we twins?! Since going gluten-free about a year and a half ago, I'm actually digesting my food, which has caused me to put on about 10 pounds. A back injury that kept me from exercise-walking for a few months sure didn't help. I never got back into the routine of heading out the door to do my walks.

I'm going to give myself a break over the holidays, and then after Christmas (probably before New Year's, though, because I don't want to chance breaking a resolution) my husband and I are going to try the South Beach Diet. I've heard great things about it from people who are on it, and it got a good review in the Nutrition Action Healthletter (from the Center for Science in the Public Interest).

Tell you what--how about we do this together? I'm dealing with the lousy mood issue too, right now, so maybe we'll both benefit from mutual accountability! Let's say we'll go for at least a short walk three days this coming week, we'll drink an extra glass of water a day, and we'll try Carla B's trick of having our "craved food" on Sunday. Yes, they're baby steps, but if we can do that, we can add others. And if we don't follow through, the other "partner" can give a smack upside the head. What do you say?

By the way--last week I dreamed I switched bodies with somebody for a little while, and the best part was that I could eat real pizza!!!!!!

I bet we can do this. I'll be thinking of you!!

Kathleen

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Bernadette--

What, are we twins?! Since going gluten-free about a year and a half ago, I'm actually digesting my food, which has caused me to put on about 10 pounds. A back injury that kept me from exercise-walking for a few months sure didn't help. I never got back into the routine of heading out the door to do my walks.

I'm going to give myself a break over the holidays, and then after Christmas (probably before New Year's, though, because I don't want to chance breaking a resolution) my husband and I are going to try the South Beach Diet. I've heard great things about it from people who are on it, and it got a good review in the Nutrition Action Healthletter (from the Center for Science in the Public Interest).

Tell you what--how about we do this together? I'm dealing with the lousy mood issue too, right now, so maybe we'll both benefit from mutual accountability! Let's say we'll go for at least a short walk three days this coming week, we'll drink an extra glass of water a day, and we'll try Carla B's trick of having our "craved food" on Sunday. Yes, they're baby steps, but if we can do that, we can add others. And if we don't follow through, the other "partner" can give a smack upside the head. What do you say?

By the way--last week I dreamed I switched bodies with somebody for a little while, and the best part was that I could eat real pizza!!!!!!

I bet we can do this. I'll be thinking of you!!

Kathleen

Bernadette--

What, are we twins?! Since going gluten-free about a year and a half ago, I'm actually digesting my food, which has caused me to put on about 10 pounds. A back injury that kept me from exercise-walking for a few months sure didn't help. I never got back into the routine of heading out the door to do my walks.

I'm going to give myself a break over the holidays, and then after Christmas (probably before New Year's, though, because I don't want to chance breaking a resolution) my husband and I are going to try the South Beach Diet. I've heard great things about it from people who are on it, and it got a good review in the Nutrition Action Healthletter (from the Center for Science in the Public Interest).

Tell you what--how about we do this together? I'm dealing with the lousy mood issue too, right now, so maybe we'll both benefit from mutual accountability! Let's say we'll go for at least a short walk three days this coming week, we'll drink an extra glass of water a day, and we'll try Carla B's trick of having our "craved food" on Sunday. Yes, they're baby steps, but if we can do that, we can add others. And if we don't follow through, the other "partner" can give a smack upside the head. What do you say?

By the way--last week I dreamed I switched bodies with somebody for a little while, and the best part was that I could eat real pizza!!!!!!

I bet we can do this. I'll be thinking of you!!

Kathleen

Hi - I'm in the same glutenfree-gained-15lbs-boat! I have given up rice and potatoes - and corn was never a big deal for me. I really want to get back to a body I feel comfortable in -- if you want some company, count me in.

Meg

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I'm going to give myself a break over the holidays, and then after Christmas (probably before New Year's, though, because I don't want to chance breaking a resolution) my husband and I are going to try the South Beach Diet. I've heard great things about it from people who are on it, and it got a good review in the Nutrition Action Healthletter (from the Center for Science in the Public Interest).

Kathleen

Kathleen,

Good for you!!! :) I already put in my two cents about South Beach, but I wanted to add that I've found the web site http://www.southbeach-diet-plan.com/ (particularly the message boards) to be very helpful, both for figuring out exactly what to eat and for support. Good luck!

Jeanne

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Carbs, fat, and protein are not the problems. It is how much you eat of each one and how much you exercise that are the problems. Try taking a 15 minute walk each day, or using the stairs instead of the elevator for one flight, or parking at the outer edge of the parking lot and walking to the building. When you want dressing with your salad, put the dressing of your choice in a small cup, then with each bite, dip your fork in the dressing before getting your salad on the fork. It will give you a hint of dressing without all the calories. You don't have to make big changes to lose weight. It is often the small things that we do that make us gain weight, so it is usually the small things we change that make us lose weight. Making those small changes permanent habits will help us keep the weight off.


Dessa

The Lord bless you and keep you; the Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you." Numbers 6:24-25

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Carbs, fat, and protein are not the problems. It is how much you eat of each one and how much you exercise that are the problems.

I completely agree with this. You could eat only one macronutrient all day long and as long as your calories were correct, you'd lose weight. It has nothing to do with what percentage of each macronutrient you eat, but how many calories you total at the end of the day.

Fad diets, i.e. South Beach, etc., don't work in the long run because you are depriving yourself of an essential macronutrient - carbs. It's not healthy to nearly cut that out of your diet.

It's all about calories - how many you take in and how many you expend. Here's a link to a calculator that will tell you how much you burn per day:

http://www.nutritiondata.com/calories-burned.html

Take that number and subtract 250. That's how many calories you should eat per day to lose. Do not, ever, EVER, go below 1600-1700 calories per day. You may lose weight at first by severely cutting your calories but your metabolism will be damaged long term and will slow to a crawl, making you start gaining weight on very little calories. I know - it happened to me.

Also, here's a great site for healthy recipes with the nutritional facts already figured out. Most of them can be easily made gluten-free:

CookingLight.com

The bottom line? Count your calories and exercise at least 3 or 4 times a week.


ELIZABETH

gluten-free (04.17.2006)

corn-free (03.27.2007)

xanthan gum-free

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Take that number and subtract 250. That's how many calories you should eat per day to lose. Do not, ever, EVER, go below 1600-1700 calories per day. You may lose weight at first by severely cutting your calories but your metabolism will be damaged long term and will slow to a crawl, making you start gaining weight on very little calories. I know - it happened to me.

I'm going to quibble with your 1600-1700 number. If I'm not fairly active, 1700 calories a day will have me putting on weight, albeit slowly and 1600 is only just under my maintenance. When you're small and short, you don't need a lot of calories. (Those numbers aren't severe cuts for me either. ;) )

I do agree with the concept, however. I've seen numbers of 1200 for that cutoff, but that does seem low if your basal metabolic rate is 2500, so it's probably not a static number, and will vary from person to person.

Also, at 1600 calories, it can be quite difficult to get a full quota of nutrients, even on a very healthy, varied diet, so lower isn't a good idea, and even there, a multivitamin can be useful.


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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I'm going to quibble with your 1600-1700 number. If I'm not fairly active, 1700 calories a day will have me putting on weight, albeit slowly and 1600 is only just under my maintenance. When you're small and short, you don't need a lot of calories. (Those numbers aren't severe cuts for me either. ;) )

I do agree with the concept, however. I've seen numbers of 1200 for that cutoff, but that does seem low if your basal metabolic rate is 2500, so it's probably not a static number, and will vary from person to person.

Also, at 1600 calories, it can be quite difficult to get a full quota of nutrients, even on a very healthy, varied diet, so lower isn't a good idea, and even there, a multivitamin can be useful.

You're absolutely right. If you are, say, a 5'0" person with small bones, you don't need as many calories as someone like me who is 5'7" with a medium-sized frame.

I don't think there is a static number, but I think many people make the mistake of eating too little for a long time. You get results when you eat 1200 calories a day... but you'll eventually have messed up your metabolism. Our bodies are pretty smart about survival - if it thinks you're starving it, it's going to hold on to every calorie it can get.


ELIZABETH

gluten-free (04.17.2006)

corn-free (03.27.2007)

xanthan gum-free

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Guest nini

from someone who has lost 110 pounds in 3 1/2 years... here are my tips...

drink water. not milk, not soy milk, not rice milk, not juice, not diet sodas, just water

don't buy LOW FAT ANYTHING, it's not about fat, good fats like olive oil, pure butter (in small amounts) avocados ect. are good for you. Earth Balance is a great dairy free butter substitute

don't worry so much about sugar either. don't go overboard on sugar but don't do NO SUGAR anything. The sugar substitutes are way worse for you than sugar. (except for Stevia, that's perfectly healthy for you)

PORTION CONTROL, remember that your stomach is only as big as your closed fist, if you are eating more than that for your protein and starch, you are eating too much (this limit does not apply for fruits and vegetables)

NOTHING BUT FRUIT BEFORE NOON, Grapefruit is awesome for burning calories and jump starting your metabolism for the day, sweeten it with a small amt. of organic sugar or Stevia and you've got a delicious breakfast. Other seasonal fruits are wonderful. Fruit salads are great to make in big quantities and eat off of for a few days (for maintaining weight you can add in yogurts and occassional proteins like eggs before noon)

Walking is great excercise. Stay active.

Allow small treats so that you don't feel deprived and end up binging.

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NOTHING BUT FRUIT BEFORE NOON, Grapefruit is awesome for burning calories and jump starting your metabolism for the day, sweeten it with a small amt. of organic sugar or Stevia and you've got a delicious breakfast. Other seasonal fruits are wonderful. Fruit salads are great to make in big quantities and eat off of for a few days (for maintaining weight you can add in yogurts and occassional proteins like eggs before noon)

This part I have to disagree with. If I don't have some form of protein for breakfast, my blood sugars drop to dangerous levels. This is something that each person will have to work out for themselves.


Dessa

The Lord bless you and keep you; the Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you." Numbers 6:24-25

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This part I have to disagree with. If I don't have some form of protein for breakfast, my blood sugars drop to dangerous levels. This is something that each person will have to work out for themselves.

I'm with you on that one Dessa, I'd be passed out on the floor without protein in the morning! I have to low carb and higher protein to lose weight, that's how i lost 53 pounds 9 years ago. With my blood sugar swings, I have to stay away from a lot of fruit, all sugars, starchy carbs, etc. I do great with fish, shellfish, and vegetables. That's the only diet that's kept my blood cholesterols in check too.

I think each person has to find the way of eating/living that suits their physical needs. I used to low fat and ballooned, counting calories totally screws up my blood sugar because I get too many carbs and not enough protein.


hypothyroid

hypoglycemic (diagnosed 1997 but symptomatic since grade school)

fibromyalgia

rheumatoid arthritis (diagnosed January 2005)

peanut allergy

restarting gluten-free January 20, 2013

elevated liver enzymes + symptoms indicated celiac January 31, 2013. Dr. didn't want to run further tests due to other health complications

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NOTHING BUT FRUIT BEFORE NOON, Grapefruit is awesome for burning calories and jump starting your metabolism for the day, sweeten it with a small amt. of organic sugar or Stevia and you've got a delicious breakfast. Other seasonal fruits are wonderful. Fruit salads are great to make in big quantities and eat off of for a few days (for maintaining weight you can add in yogurts and occassional proteins like eggs before noon)

I disagree with this. Protein aids in digestion of carbs like the sugars in fruit and has been shown to keep you feeling fuller for longer than either fat or carbs. Eating a lot of fruit in the morning is fine, but you shouldn't eat ONLY fruit.


ELIZABETH

gluten-free (04.17.2006)

corn-free (03.27.2007)

xanthan gum-free

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Fad diets, i.e. South Beach, etc., don't work in the long run because you are depriving yourself of an essential macronutrient - carbs. It's not healthy to nearly cut that out of your diet.

Sorry, but I have to quibble with lumping South Beach in with "fad" diets. It tends to get lumped in with Atkins and classified as "low-carb," but in fact it is very different from Atkins and is quite well-balanced. It was originally developed by a cardiologist as a means for controlling high cholesterol and/or diabetes; weight loss was never the primary purpose. There are plenty of carbs, just not so many *grains* - particularly heavily processed grains - as in the typical American diet. It includes *loads* of veggies (which do have carbs!), fruit, lean meats, and good fats - and yes, 2-3 servings of whole grains each day. I feel healthier on this diet than I ever have in my life, and I consider it a permanent change in my eating habits, not a temporary thing.

Jeanne

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Guest nini
I'm with you on that one Dessa, I'd be passed out on the floor without protein in the morning! I have to low carb and higher protein to lose weight, that's how i lost 53 pounds 9 years ago. With my blood sugar swings, I have to stay away from a lot of fruit, all sugars, starchy carbs, etc. I do great with fish, shellfish, and vegetables. That's the only diet that's kept my blood cholesterols in check too.

I think each person has to find the way of eating/living that suits their physical needs. I used to low fat and ballooned, counting calories totally screws up my blood sugar because I get too many carbs and not enough protein.

I was just stating what worked for me... everyone does need to work out what works for them, but that worked for me. Once I got past the initial kick starting of my metabolism I did add some protein in in the mornings, but when I did that my weight loss stopped and stagnated for a while. It wasn't until I went back to the nothing but fruit before noon that I started losing again. I'm maintaining my weight right now and I do eat carbs and protein for breakfast sometimes now, I was only referring to the kick start for weight loss... sorry if that wasn't clear.

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This part I have to disagree with. If I don't have some form of protein for breakfast, my blood sugars drop to dangerous levels. This is something that each person will have to work out for themselves.

I agree, I have the same problem. If I don't have protein in the morning than I will get shaky and feel sick to my stomach. However, my friend eats only fruit in the morning and is completely fine. So, figure out what works for you!

Sorry, but I have to quibble with lumping South Beach in with "fad" diets. It tends to get lumped in with Atkins and classified as "low-carb," but in fact it is very different from Atkins and is quite well-balanced. It was originally developed by a cardiologist as a means for controlling high cholesterol and/or diabetes; weight loss was never the primary purpose. There are plenty of carbs, just not so many *grains* - particularly heavily processed grains - as in the typical American diet. It includes *loads* of veggies (which do have carbs!), fruit, lean meats, and good fats - and yes, 2-3 servings of whole grains each day. I feel healthier on this diet than I ever have in my life, and I consider it a permanent change in my eating habits, not a temporary thing.

Jeanne

I totally agree! You have to read the book to really know how balanced this "diet" is. It's terrifically healthy and I strive to use this "diet" as an inspiration for my lifestyle. What can be better than fresh, healthy veggies and lean meats? Yum!!


2010- Gluten, Soy, Corn, Dairy, Eggs, Nut free. Sugar, non-gluten grains lite(Yes, still plenty to eat!)

2010-Doctor diagnosed me as Celiac then took diagnoses back, then said avoid gluten for life

2009

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I completely agree with this. You could eat only one macronutrient all day long and as long as your calories were correct, you'd lose weight. It has nothing to do with what percentage of each macronutrient you eat, but how many calories you total at the end of the day.

This didn't work for me as I got over 30. I now realise it was probably hypothyroid as well. BUT ...a banana for morning tea made me gain 2 kg in a month ! And returning to cheese instead made me lose the 2kg. If I ate a meal without protein I would fall over faint within 2 hours. I was Reactive Hypoglycemic.

To lose weight with RH and before Hypo meds .... I used 'The Insulin Resistance Diet' by Drs Hart & Grossman. Its basically pretty healthy - but instead of 3 large meals a day with RH dips in between ...they advise regular mini meals every 2 hours. That way your insulin never surges high ( and causes hunger and the dip)Without high Insulin in your body - you lose weight. Insulin is a fat grabbing hormone.

They advised 8 mini meals a day based on approx 50:50 protein and complex carbs.

I have had various diets over the years, and probably messed up by eating too little. Being Hypo made it hard to lose weight. But this diet was magic for me.

Sorry, but I have to quibble with lumping South Beach in with "fad" diets. It tends to get lumped in with Atkins and classified as "low-carb," but in fact it is very different from Atkins and is quite well-balanced.

Actually I think Atkins was a genius. His diet has veges in it too and was balanced. He did all his basic books 40 years ago when everyone else thought he was a nutter. His main critism of the Western diet was too much carb ( his diets were low carb too - not no carb) and Transfats - and I see that now ..in 2006 ...they are finally banning Transfats !! But Atkins was the one that started that publicity 40 years ago. I wish my late Dad was still alive to hear this. He was an Atkins believer all along and tried to tell everyone of Transfats 30 years ago - but no one wanted to listen. Atkins was making the point that it is healthier to eat animal fat than Transfat. The new Atkins Diet that was published later is actually quite big on veges and healthy choices.


Diagnosed May 2006 - Hashimotos Thyroid after being diagnosed in 1977 and told it didn't matter.

Diagnosed June 2006 with adrenal insufficiency.

Diagnosed June 2006 as Gluten Intolerant after I failed the Challenge Diet. Negative blood test.No biopsy.

Diagnosed June 2006 as B12 low. Needed weekly injections for a year.Still have them every 2 weeks.

Trialled Dairy Free Diet and reacted positively to that challenge in January 07.

News Flash! Coeliac Genetic Testing done April 08 . DQ2 Positive !

Diagnosed July 2010 FODMAP. Limits on Fructose, lactose, polyols, fructans. NO ONION! But I can have hard cheese, butter and cream again!!!

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Sorry, but I have to quibble with lumping South Beach in with "fad" diets. It tends to get lumped in with Atkins and classified as "low-carb," but in fact it is very different from Atkins and is quite well-balanced. It was originally developed by a cardiologist as a means for controlling high cholesterol and/or diabetes; weight loss was never the primary purpose. There are plenty of carbs, just not so many *grains* - particularly heavily processed grains - as in the typical American diet. It includes *loads* of veggies (which do have carbs!), fruit, lean meats, and good fats - and yes, 2-3 servings of whole grains each day. I feel healthier on this diet than I ever have in my life, and I consider it a permanent change in my eating habits, not a temporary thing.

Jeanne

I think the strictness of South Beach is what makes it a fad diet. If you consider that South Beach focuses on eating lean meats, lots of veggies, good fats, good carbs & fruits, it's a great healthy eating plan. But the idea of cutting carbs out for the first few weeks (I'm pretty sure SB does this) or even counting carbs at all makes it a "diet", not a lifestyle, and lifestyle change is what constitutes lifetime weight maintenance.


ELIZABETH

gluten-free (04.17.2006)

corn-free (03.27.2007)

xanthan gum-free

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I think the strictness of South Beach is what makes it a fad diet. If you consider that South Beach focuses on eating lean meats, lots of veggies, good fats, good carbs & fruits, it's a great healthy eating plan. But the idea of cutting carbs out for the first few weeks (I'm pretty sure SB does this) or even counting carbs at all makes it a "diet", not a lifestyle, and lifestyle change is what constitutes lifetime weight maintenance.

Counting carbs can be a lifestyle change. I started counting carbs in February of 1997 and continue to this day, almost 10 years later. That to me, is a lifestyle change. I think too many times people think of something as a diet to be started and then quit as soon as a "goal" is achieved when in fact, people who are successful stay on this "diet" (which is their change in eating lifestyle) for life. One of my friends was 100 pounds overweight as a child. She went on a diet in junior high, lost the 100 pounds and still eats that way today and we are in our mid 40's! That's how you have to live if you want to keep the weight off. If low carb works and you're healthy that way, there is no reason you can't live that way. Same with low fat, calorie counting, whatever your method of losing weight and gaining health.


hypothyroid

hypoglycemic (diagnosed 1997 but symptomatic since grade school)

fibromyalgia

rheumatoid arthritis (diagnosed January 2005)

peanut allergy

restarting gluten-free January 20, 2013

elevated liver enzymes + symptoms indicated celiac January 31, 2013. Dr. didn't want to run further tests due to other health complications

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I think the strictness of South Beach is what makes it a fad diet. If you consider that South Beach focuses on eating lean meats, lots of veggies, good fats, good carbs & fruits, it's a great healthy eating plan. But the idea of cutting carbs out for the first few weeks (I'm pretty sure SB does this) or even counting carbs at all makes it a "diet", not a lifestyle, and lifestyle change is what constitutes lifetime weight maintenance.

It's true that the first two weeks are pretty harsh. They *do* have a point, though, which is to sort of "reset" the body's blood-sugar regulation system, which has gotten out of whack for many people. (If I remember correctly, this part is aimed at the pre-diabetic syndrome that many of the diet's target audience suffer from.) It also helps get sugar cravings under control. But for anyone just looking for a healthier eating plan, the first two weeks can certainly be skipped. (In fact, they're SUPPOSED to be skipped for certain groups, e.g. breastfeeding moms.)

Truth be told, I only did Phase 1 for 10 days instead of the full 2 weeks, and I'm not convinced that that part of the diet needs to be *quite* so restrictive. I'll grant you that it does feel a bit faddish. But Phase 2 is really the heart of the diet, and it definitely feels like a lifestyle change. I do have a plan where I eat only 2-3 servings of grain a day, but I don't "count" carbs or anything else, really. It's just how I eat now, with a lot *less* obsessing about food than I used to do! :)

Jeanne

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You could eat only one macronutrient all day long and as long as your calories were correct, you'd lose weight.

Gotta chime in here. Currently, I eat an average of 2,000 calories/day, often more. I am 5'3. I am losing weight, slowly. My only carbs are veggies and small amounts of condiments. I am eating at least 600 calories MORE than every calorie calculator has ever told me I need, yet I am not gaining but losing. And I gained when I was eating a high carb, controlled calorie diet (between 1200-1500 cals/day). Clearly, it is not all about calories - sure they factor in, but not as we've been taught. Yes, there have been studies that prove the calorie theory is inaccurate and that different macronutrients are processed and react differently in the body...if I find them, I'll post them!

Human beings cannot live without protein, and they cannot live without fat. They can live without carbs. There is nothing in carbohydrates that cannot be obtained in either fat or protein. Ask an Inuit sometime ;) Low-carb is a very natural way of eating - meats, veggies, dairy if you tolerate it, berries, melons, nuts, seeds. It is also self-regulating - when you're eating protein and fat, for example, it's very difficult to overeat. If you try to overeat fat, you will actually feel nauseous! Mix fat with sugar and it's a whole other story...

Ultimately you have to find what you can live with. For me, low-carb is effortless (esp since I can't have gluten anyway!) and just the way I eat - getting trimmer and healthier is a side-effect and one I don't have to make a big effort to achieve.

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