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snowcoveredheart

Take Away And Wine - gluten-free Verse Reality

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so its moms birthday today and we had chinese takeaway- already i feel that balloon like and other less polite issues surfacing which means im in my room away from the social areana...

is this common with takeaway? i would have thought some were worse than others i tried to be careful with my food choices

and STUPID question; but is all wine ok? (i only drink red...)?

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so its moms birthday today and we had chinese takeaway- already i feel that balloon like and other less polite issues surfacing which means im in my room away from the social areana...

is this common with takeaway? i would have thought some were worse than others i tried to be careful with my food choices

and STUPID question; but is all wine ok? (i only drink red...)?

Yup, Zansu is correct. Most chinese takeouts or inhouse have wheat in their soy.

I would recommend that you get some Triumph Dining Cards. They are laminated cards in several languages, Chinese among them. I have not ordered Chinese as of yet. I have asked and I find that I can cook chinese better that what they could provide me safely....like steamed, blah, boarding everything.

Others may suggest certain meals that are safe and tasty. I have not been successful.

Regarding the wine...there are some here that react to the sulfites in the wine, but gluten is not an issue.

Hope you can reclaim some of your mothers celebration.

www.triumphdining.com


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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Actually, wine MAY contain wheat & other allergens. There is a proposal outstanding to require allergen labeling on it just like food gets. This is controversial, with the wine industry saying it is not a problem, though.

http://www1.pressdemocrat.com/apps/pbcs.dl...1036/BUSINESS01

That said, I'm still drinking wine. When I have reactions, I've always been able to tie them to something else. And if I reacted to the wine, it could be to the use of milk or eggs in the fining process.


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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Other than wine 'coolers' or specialty blends, most 'pure' wines do NOT contain gluten. However, winemakers often use other allergens to 'fine' or purify their wines. White wines often contain bits of dairy or egg protein, because winemakers use skim milk or egg white to 'fine' white wines. Red wines can contain bits of egg protein or gelatin from fish. There are unrefined wines available, but they are usually more expensive (about $10 per bottle or more), such as the Frey brand. 'Unrefined' or 'nonfiltre' is listed on the label of wines which don't use those allergens to process their wines. Current law does not require alcoholic products to be labeled for allergens.

BURDEE


Gluten, dairy, soy, egg, cane sugar, vanilla and nutmeg free. Enterolab diagnosed gluten/casein intolerant 7/04; soy intolerant 8/07. ELISA test diagnosed egg/cane sugar IgG allergies 8/06; vanilla/nutmeg 8/06. 2006-10 diagnosed by DNA Microbial stool tests and successfully treated: Klebsiella, Enterobacter Cloaecae, Cryptosporidia, Candida, C-diff, Achromobacter, H. Pylori and Dientamoeba Fragilis. 6/10 Heidelberg capsule test diagnosed hypochloridia. Vitamin D deficiency, hypothyroiditis, hypochloridia and low white blood cells caused vulnerability to infections. I now take Betaine HCl, probiotics, Vitamin D and T3 thyroid supplement to maintain immunity.

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Other than wine 'coolers' or specialty blends, most 'pure' wines do NOT contain gluten.

According to the article I linked to: "Wheat-based glues are sometimes used to seal wine barrels, raising the issue of whether the wine comes into contact with a wheat product ..." I don't know if any testing has been done to see if this results in the presence of gluten in the finished product or not. I guess we will learn that when and if allergen labeling for wine gets adopted as a result of the current rulemaking. If you know of the results of some actual testing, I would like to hear about them.

I think I remember reading that some other country or countries do require allergen labeling. But this would be within those countries. In the US, don't we get the US approved labels?

Thanks for the tip about the "unrefined" or "nonfiltre" label. There are also web sites that list vegan wines; these at least wouldn't contain the milk, egg, or fish. But I don't know of anyone listing what glues are used to seal the wine barrels :huh:

What I hope is that the wine industry will be able to prove that all this stuff is out of the finished product. Heck, I'm supposed to stay away from yeast as well, which is something that the fining substances are supposed to link to & then be filtered out together. From my research about that, reactions to wine by those allergic to yeast are supposed to be rare.


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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Chinese takaway and Indian traditionally do not use wheat to thicken. But, as mentioned the cheap soy sauces now may contain wheat. I have rarely had reactions and those that I had were more realted to MSG perhaps (spaced out, nausea etc). As the wheat in the soy is only a minor component and the soy only a small part of the sauce, or maybe I have been lucky, the Chinese meals we have typically I am OK with. Of course I do not eat any of the fried in batter stuff like sweet/sour or whatever - never quite sure about those.

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I just don't worry about wine. Sulfites are not a concern to me, nor is dairy. Gluten in wine is just simply not a concern. Cheers.

Chinese food is a whole different ball game, as others have said. I don't touch it (we don't have PF Chang's, or whatever it is called, here in Canada). Cheap soy sauce is usually more wheat than soy. The restaurants generally treat it as a commodity and buy the least expensive one they can find.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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i dnt know if i react to MSG and if thats different to gluten - its all very new, i had the tests and camera down my throat years ago but i ignored al the advice, so im kinda starting from scratch here - all i know is i had the food and ive been really ill.... i know i didnt have any dairy (as i wasnt being actually being very very sick) so it must have been either the chinese food or the wine - i dnt drink white and ive not noticed a reaction (course the usual hangover reaction is a jippy tummy and a headache so its hard to tell if wines a nono as well!).

today i feel like a punch bag thats been ran over by a bus so what ever it was was more than enough! and i was so careful about the stuff... :( this sucks!

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As the wheat in the soy is only a minor component and the soy only a small part of the sauce, or maybe I have been lucky

I think you've just been lucky. Soy sauces that have wheat usually have it listed as one of the first couple ingredients ... even above soy. Maybe the restaurant you go to uses one of the soy sauces that does not have wheat.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Unfortunately, most chinese food is made with soy sauce - which contains wheat.

I've said it before, but if you like asian food, and want to eat out, seek out a Vietnamese place. My wife's family is Chinese/Vietnamese, and when I'm around, they've pretty much just started avoiding Chinese places since it's nearly impossible to get gluten free.

Vietnamese places tend to use Fish Sauce, which is safe normally. They also use lots of fresh veggies and things aren't as oily. I prefer it to chinese even when the chinese is safe.

Saturday we went out, had baked fish. It's served whole, with all the fixings for spring rolls. Yum Yum!

Geoff


Celiac - Gluten Free since Late December 2006

Positive Dietary response, biopsy, Enterolab

Lactose intolerant - dietary response test only

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I've said it before, but if you like asian food, and want to eat out, seek out a Vietnamese place. My wife's family is Chinese/Vietnamese, and when I'm around, they've pretty much just started avoiding Chinese places since it's nearly impossible to get gluten free.

Vietnamese places tend to use Fish Sauce, which is safe normally. They also use lots of fresh veggies and things aren't as oily. I prefer it to chinese even when the chinese is safe.

Saturday we went out, had baked fish. It's served whole, with all the fixings for spring rolls. Yum Yum!

Geoff

Of course, it's always important to ask!!!

Geoff


Celiac - Gluten Free since Late December 2006

Positive Dietary response, biopsy, Enterolab

Lactose intolerant - dietary response test only

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