Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

JulesH

Is Ibs Common With Celiac?

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I know that the symptoms for IBS and celiac are very similar and they are often confused, but my doctor is now telling me that he thinks I have both.

I was diagnosed with celiac about a year and a half ago, by colonoscopy which found sprue and then a follow up blood test. So I think there's no question that I have celiac. But I have stomach issues that have cropped up more recently (and are not due to unintentional gluten intake, I've made absolutely sure of that) that my doctor is now saying is probably IBS. He actually said that he's thought that I have had IBS for a while, but when the celiac diagnosis came up, he just attributed everything to that.

So, am I just unlucky and beat the odds and have both, or is this something common?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, according to my gastroenterologist it's quite possible to have both. I do, and mine is caused by additional food intolerance.

It's not uncommon for a Celiac to go gluten-free, then weeks or months later get symptoms again. The best thing to do is an elimination diet to try and uncover what other foods may be causing your symptoms.

We hear a lot of "IBS is a catchall diagnosis"--and that's true if the doctor is not willing to dig deeper and attempt to find the cause. I think of IBS as more of a symptom than a diagnosis. It's not normal to have chronic D or be constipated most of the time. If you are truly gluten-free, and are sure you aren't getting gluten, I would suggest cutting out dairy, soy and corn (one at a time) and see if that makes any difference.

I also take a Caltrate 600 with vitamin D twice a day--it is quite helpful for IBS with D.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the responses. My doctor is not trying to take back the diagnosis of celiac, and he is very conscientious, and is doing further testing to make sure there is nothing else that could be causing my stomach problems. He told me that for my own well being I should look into it, and I'm inclined to trust him and take the medication to make my stomach stop hurting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you for the responses. My doctor is not trying to take back the diagnosis of celiac, and he is very conscientious, and is doing further testing to make sure there is nothing else that could be causing my stomach problems. He told me that for my own well being I should look into it, and I'm inclined to trust him and take the medication to make my stomach stop hurting.

HI

I have both and have been gluten-free and other foods for 2 1/2 years. What medicine did he put you on and was it for the IBS?

Judy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HI

I have both and have been gluten-free and other foods for 2 1/2 years. What medicine did he put you on and was it for the IBS?

Judy

None, yet. I'm having an ultrasound and CT today to confirm that there's nothing else, but if everything else is fine, he said he'd put me on an anti-spasmodic. I can't remember which specifically he mentioned, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found that continuing intestinal symptoms were due to other foods I'm sensitive to. When I follow a very basic diet of meat and veggies (and a few other things) my IBS clears up. So I'm always trying to identify what the heck it was I ate that set me off.

The "Big Eight" list of things people are allergic to (food-wise) is probably a good place to start:

Soy

Wheat

Milk -- dairy

Shellfish

Peanuts

Tree nuts

Fish

Eggs

But right now I'm suspecting chocolate, SF chewing gum, a sugar free raspberry syrup I'm using. I've eliminated all of them and I'll reintroduce them slowly and see how Mr. Gut feels. Right now, all is quite on the southern frontier so it is time to test something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jules......how did your tests go today?

Judy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But right now I'm suspecting chocolate, SF chewing gum,

Ya know what?? I always chew the same kind of gum, but the store was out of my preferred brand the other day. So, I bought something different. Without reading the ingredients (I know... BAD) I shoved a piece in my mouth and began to chew vigorously.

Within minutes, my entire face was itchy - and my throat felt tight.

I'm fairly certain that I've developed a wheat allergy - and *that* is my typical reaction to cross-contamination and wheat ingestion. So, it would not surprise me, at all, if there is wheat in your gum!!!

I wish I could remember what kind it was that I bought. It was "stick" sugar free gum. I normally buy Orbit gum and have not had any problems with that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI:

"Q: Are there some celiacs who do not respond to the gluten-free diet?

A few patients have a poor clinical and/or histologic (biopsy) response to the diet. An important step in assessing patients who are non-responders is to confirm the diagnosis of celiac disease by review of the original biopsy, preferably by an expert gastrointestinal pathologist. However, the most common cause of a poor response is continued gluten ingestion, which may be intentional or unintentional.

An intolerance to other foods, such as lactose and fructose or soy can be a reason for lack of improvement. Some non-responders may have reversible pancreatic insufficiency or bacterial overgrowth, requiring treatment. Colonoscopy might indicate other causes of the failure to respond, such as microscopic colitis or inflammatory bowel disease. Though rare, other causes of failure to respond to a gluten-free diet include lymphoma, ulcerative jejunitis, collagenous sprue, autoimmune enteropathy or refractory sprue."

http://www.celiacdiseasecenter.columbia.ed...nts/A02-FAQ.htm

You may want to speak to your doctor about some of the above Celiac-associated conditions (along with others).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jules......how did your tests go today?

Judy

My doctor's initial reaction was that there's nothing there "that needs to be dealt with right now" (whatever that means ;) ) but should have a full report next week, when we'll discuss what to do next. Thanks for your concern!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My doctor's initial reaction was that there's nothing there "that needs to be dealt with right now" (whatever that means ;) ) but should have a full report next week, when we'll discuss what to do next. Thanks for your concern!

KEY IS 'DEAL WITH RIGHT NOW' :ph34r: ............HANG AROUND FOLKS FOR THE DETAILS.....OMG THESE DRS............

WELL KEEP US POSTED OK ......................WE'LL WAIT WITH YA!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KEY IS 'DEAL WITH RIGHT NOW' :ph34r: ............HANG AROUND FOLKS FOR THE DETAILS.....OMG THESE DRS............

WELL KEEP US POSTED OK ......................WE'LL WAIT WITH YA!

Well, when I saw him, he laughed when I asked why he had said "right now." I had him go through all the reports with me and there was nothing. He just likes to torture me apparently. :rolleyes:

But I really do love this guy. He doesn't want to drop it until we know for sure what's wrong (which is how I got the diagnosis for celiac in the first place -- any other doctor would've just said "Oh, you're female, so you're anemic. The end."), so he's sending me for more testing, since he's now localized my pain to possibly my stomach, rather than my large intestines. As soon as I work out whether the insurance requires me to see a GI before I do a barium swallow, I'll be able to make the appointment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FYI:

"Q: Are there some celiacs who do not respond to the gluten-free diet?

A few patients have a poor clinical and/or histologic (biopsy) response to the diet. An important step in assessing patients who are non-responders is to confirm the diagnosis of celiac disease by review of the original biopsy, preferably by an expert gastrointestinal pathologist. However, the most common cause of a poor response is continued gluten ingestion, which may be intentional or unintentional.

An intolerance to other foods, such as lactose and fructose or soy can be a reason for lack of improvement. Some non-responders may have reversible pancreatic insufficiency or bacterial overgrowth, requiring treatment. Colonoscopy might indicate other causes of the failure to respond, such as microscopic colitis or inflammatory bowel disease. Though rare, other causes of failure to respond to a gluten-free diet include lymphoma, ulcerative jejunitis, collagenous sprue, autoimmune enteropathy or refractory sprue."

http://www.celiacdiseasecenter.columbia.ed...nts/A02-FAQ.htm

You may want to speak to your doctor about some of the above Celiac-associated conditions (along with others).

Really great answer: celiac's is often not as easy as eliminating gluten... it certainly has not been for me. It is getting to the point that I just about cannot eat anything any more! But I am not losing weight b/c I basically can't move enough to maintain a metabolism! Still trying to figure it out...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My "IBS" turned out to be sphincter of oddi dysfunction and chronic pancreatitis. Thank goodness for informed doctors at major medical centers! My aunt's "IBS" was ovarian cancer, and she died. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IBS is the number one misdiagnosis for Celiac. It is a garbage can diagnosis for when the doc does not know why you are having stomach issues.

I have yet to see a decent definition of IBS. It seems to shift with the seasons and moon cycles as far as I can tell.

I think its just an acronym doctors use for I'm Bamboozled Sorry ...

I think most cases it just means they don't have a clue and won't admit it. Calling it something makes it sound like they know what it is I guess.

I'm with the others that a primary reason for non improvement after an initial stage is often due to other intolerances than gluten.

I would also hazard a guess that many cases of IBS wil turn out to be other food intolerances noone has come up with a test for yet.

one related aspect to consider is the gluten-free diet can make us change what we eat quite significantly. Certain 'food's' such as Soya should probably never be eaten as a source of actual food but we get classed with the 'healthfood' freaks who will eat anytihng unconventional so long as it sounds exotic and we end up eating more of it just because its easier to buy gluten-free that way in a sort of catch-22.

I'm not fanatical about not eating Soya but I do try and limit it to an absolute minimum, likewise I TRY and limit my diary intake

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Top Posters +

  • Upcoming Events

    • March 24, 2019 Until March 27, 2019
      0  
      NEW ORLEANS GOURMET GLUTEN-FREE mini GETAWAY    March 24 ~ 27, 2019   We have arranged a fun and Gluten-free food filled mini in the city known for it's food and fun.  We have arranged to eat many of the famous dishes that aren't usually Gluten-free at a few of the World Renown restaurants.   Staying at the Royal Sonesta Hotel on Bourbon Street in the center of the French Quarter, you'll be able to enjoy the ambiance of the city at all hours.   Our itinerary will include a Luxury Coach tour of the city and surrounding area - Admission to The National World War II Museum, including the Tom Hanks" 4D film "Beyond All Boundaries" - an exciting Airboat ride and tour through the Bayou.      This it the 3rd time we have visited New Orleans and it has always been well attended, so join us even if you've been there before.  Check out our website for the complete itinerary and cost.    Due to contractual obligations we must have 20 participants by October 31, 2018 to make this a go.      If you have any questions just give us a call at 410-939-3218.  Bob & Ruth info@bobandruths.com (410) 939-3218
    • March 27, 2019 04:00 PM Until 08:00 AM
      0  
       
       
       
      Celiac Emotional Healing Support Group
       
       
       
      Again you are invited to join Johnny Patout, LCSW for Baton Rouge's first emotional healing support group meeting to assist those living with celiac disease manage the emotional challenges so many of us face. Most often the emotional disturbances include depression, disinterest in normal activities, insomnia, grief, mood changes, anxiety, inability to concentrate, extreme concern about managing a gluten-free lifestyle and other emotional and behavioral challenges.
       
      The professionals at Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center created the emotional healing support group to give us a safe place to begin to process our emotions and support each other as we heal emotionally while managing celiac disease and the resulting autoimmune disorders.
       
      The emotional healing support group meets every Thursday, 6:00-7:00pm, at the Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center of Baton Rouge. Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center is located at 4637 Jamestown Avenue, Baton Rouge, Suite B-1. Suite B-1 is upstairs.
       
      The support group is free and open everyone managing celiac disease. For more information: emotionalhealingforceliacs@hotmail.com
    • March 30, 2019 Until March 31, 2019
      0  
      Nourished Festival is a family-friendly event with 10 locations across the US. Attendees will be able to sample food, health and beauty products, meet with companies, learn about the most current food lifestyles, receive coupons and attend educational sessions with industry experts. 
      Nourished Festival, managed by The Nourished Group and presented by Enjoy Life Foods, is the largest gluten-free, allergy-friendly and specialty diet event in the US, with 10 locations including.
      ABOUT THE NOURISHED FESTIVALS
      Managed by The Nourished Group, formerly The Gluten Free Media Group, The Nourished Festivals are the largest and fastest growing special diet consumer events in the United States. Started in 2007, the events have expanded from one to ten cities throughout the country. The festivals cater to anyone looking to lead a healthier lifestyle or those who follow a specialty diet due to autoimmune conditions, food sensitivities, allergies or intolerances. Offerings including Paleo, Keto, Plant-Based, Gluten-Free, Allergen-Friendly and Nut-Free products. The events provide the opportunity for attendees to sample and purchase new products, receive coupons, meet with brand ambassadors and attend educational classes with industry experts. For more information, visit http://www.nourishedfestival.com 
       
I enjoy listening to Ted Talks.  I found this one on dementia.  The take?  No success in developing drugs to stop dementia, so they are looking for ways to prevent it through diet!  Food can heal!   https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=f0WCb23KPEw Interesting!  
  • Blog Entries

  • ×
    ×
    • Create New...