Jump to content
  • Sign Up

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Okay, I know it's not exactly the same, but... I can't have eggs. The recipes I've seen and the frozen ones I've found all have eggs. Someone at another forum gave me a recipe for ones that didn't have eggs, but I failed to save it to my computer. The forum closed. Said it was going to Miss Roben's but never did and... Now they are closed.

I have seen recipes for faux stuff that sound good but I've never made them. Then I thought of stuffed shells!

I can get gluten-free shells here. Do you think it would work if I cooked and stuffed them with some mashed potatoes and onion? I am also allergic to dairy so would have to use a little rice milk in there. I thought I could then cover them with a mess of onions sauteed in Nucoa and olive oil and then put them in the oven to heat through.

Do you think this would work? Would it be enough like Pierogies? If not, maybe I'll just try one of the recipes with lasagna noodles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

between your issues and your daughter's, you have all of my issues pretty much covered! Add rice to the two of you and you have me. It does make things very hard! I wish I knew how to help you get perogies....I'd LOVE to have some too! I am still trying to learn to cook A LITTLE for me. I think I would use my Ancient Harvest Quinoa pasta and then mix it with a mashed potato/onion mixture and forget about making nice little raviolis. You would have the flavor and that's what's important. Best wishes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like a pretty good mock pierogi to me. I always liked my pierogies sauteed and browned a little, but on the whole I think the filling and onions in the rice pasta would pretty much add up to the pierogi experience. Do you even need the pasta? Let us know how it comes out!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sounds like a pretty good mock pierogi to me. I always liked my pierogies sauteed and browned a little, but on the whole I think the filling and onions in the rice pasta would pretty much add up to the pierogi experience. Do you even need the pasta? Let us know how it comes out!

My husband likes his Pierogies fried as well. I prefer them not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes! These are just like I remembered them. Only they're a little more like busted open Pierogies. Hehehe. But sooo good! These will for sure be a new favorite!

I started with 6 large russet potatoes. Peeled and boiled. Then drained and mashed. Into the mash I put one Walla Walla Sweet Onion (the smallest I could find which is still rather large for an onion) that had been finely chopped and sauteed in some Nucoa margarine. Also plenty of salt and pepper and about 3 more Tablespoons of Nucoa. Did it to taste. I used my huge, shallow pasta bowl to mash them in so it allowed them to cool down for easier handling.

Meanwhile, I brought some heavily salted water to a boil and cooked up 2 boxes of Tinkyada rice large shells for stuffing. This was probably 1/2 to 3/4 of a box too much. I always worry that they will break though and in this house extra pasta is not likely to go to waste.

I also sauteed 3 more really huge Walla Walla Sweet onions in about 1 1/2 sticks of melted Nucoa until they were slightly caramelized. I put not quite half of these in a 9" x 13" baking dish.

I cooked the shells for about 16 minutes (or to taste) then ran cold water over them and drained repeatedly until they were cool enough to touch.

The shells were then drained one at a time and stuffed with the mashed potatoes, placing the open side up. Had one full layer and a partial layer on top. Then topped with the rest of the onions and drizzled the remaining Nucoa on.

Covered with foil and attempted to bake for about 20 minutes or until heated through. But... They smelled soo good that the natives got restless. I took them out and microwaved us each a serving.

I'd say this makes about 8 servings. For normal people. We are pigs in this house.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those sound so good.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Those sound so good.....

YEAH THEY DO!!!!

I'm going to have to try those. I haven't had a pierogie in years!!! It's about time to try. Thanks for posting! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Conte's from Vineland NJ sells ready made pierogi's that are onion & potato , casein free . They are very good....just in case anyone doesn't have time to make homemade.

mamaw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Conte's from Vineland NJ sells ready made pierogi's that are onion & potato , casein free . They are very good....just in case anyone doesn't have time to make homemade.

mamaw

Can you order them online?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Conte's from Vineland NJ sells ready made pierogi's that are onion & potato , casein free . They are very good....just in case anyone doesn't have time to make homemade.

mamaw

I 2nd that. The Conte's ones are fabulous!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll third the Conte's.

Your recipes sounds really good and I'll be giving it a go.

Thanks for sharing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aren't pierogies the same thing as Russian "Pelmeni"? Pelmeni are like little raviolis and can be stuffed with meat or potatoes. I make them gluten-free fairly often. My son, adopted from Russia, loves them.

Dough for Pelmeni or Ravioli

1-1/4 C Brown Rice Flour

1/2 C Potato Starch

1/4 C Tapioca Flour

generous 2-1/2 tsp Xanthan Gum

1 Tbs. oil

1/2 tsp. salt

1/2+ C Water

Sift dry ingredients 3 times. Add oil and water. You will probably need to add a little more water, but do it slowly. Stir until dough forms a ball. Make sure it is not dry! It should be smooth and almost creamy. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. Roll out on board dusted with potato starch.

Good luck!

Liz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Aren't pierogies the same thing as Russian "Pelmeni"? Pelmeni are like little raviolis and can be stuffed with meat or potatoes. I make them gluten-free fairly often. My son, adopted from Russia, loves them.

Dough for Pelmeni or Ravioli

1-1/4 C Brown Rice Flour

1/2 C Potato Starch

1/4 C Tapioca Flour

generous 2-1/2 tsp Xanthan Gum

1 Tbs. oil

1/2 tsp. salt

1/2+ C Water

Sift dry ingredients 3 times. Add oil and water. You will probably need to add a little more water, but do it slowly. Stir until dough forms a ball. Make sure it is not dry! It should be smooth and almost creamy. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. Roll out on board dusted with potato starch.

Good luck!

Liz

Thanks! Now maybe I can make Ravioli!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks! Now maybe I can make Ravioli!

I am gluten-free, Egg-free, Dairy-free, etc. Traditionally we put egg in the dough so I wondered how this dough stands up to cooking--i.e. does it tend to stay together or is there anything to add in place of an egg such as egg replacer or flaxseed mixture?

Thanks and I can't wait to try this recipe!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Okay, I know it's not exactly the same, but... I can't have eggs. The recipes I've seen and the frozen ones I've found all have eggs. Someone at another forum gave me a recipe for ones that didn't have eggs, but I failed to save it to my computer. The forum closed. Said it was going to Miss Roben's but never did and... Now they are closed.

I have seen recipes for faux stuff that sound good but I've never made them. Then I thought of stuffed shells!

I can get gluten-free shells here. Do you think it would work if I cooked and stuffed them with some mashed potatoes and onion? I am also allergic to dairy so would have to use a little rice milk in there. I thought I could then cover them with a mess of onions sauteed in Nucoa and olive oil and then put them in the oven to heat through.

Do you think this would work? Would it be enough like Pierogies? If not, maybe I'll just try one of the recipes with lasagna noodles.

Oh man I miss pierogis!!!

I will have to try these alternatives too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am gluten-free, Egg-free, Dairy-free, etc. Traditionally we put egg in the dough so I wondered how this dough stands up to cooking--i.e. does it tend to stay together or is there anything to add in place of an egg such as egg replacer or flaxseed mixture?

Thanks and I can't wait to try this recipe!!!

I've made it dozens of times and it holds together really well. Just don't try to roll it too thin. Also, make sure that there is enough xanthan gum in the dough. If it doesn't hold together before rolling out, there isn't enough x-gum in there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No eggs in this recipe and the dough is easy to work with. No one could tell that these were gluten free.

Perogie dough

1-1/4 C Rice Flour

1/2 C Potato Starch

1/4 C Tapioca Flour

generous 2-1/2 tsp Xanthan Gum

1 Tbs. oil

1/2 tsp. salt

1/2+ C Water

Sift dry ingredients 3 times. Add oil and water. You might need to add a little more water, but do it slowly. Stir until dough forms a ball. Make sure it is not dry! It should be smooth and almost creamy. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. Roll out on board dusted with white rice flour.

Filling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks! We can't have the dairy but I could probably do them like I do the faux ones. And I will for sure try this with a beef filling for Ravioli.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately I can't comment on American Peirogi but I expect these have a passing similarity to slavic peirogi in the same way American Pizza looks similar to Italian Pizza.

Anyway: In Poland Peirogi are huge .. not in size but cultural cuisine.

The relationship with Italian Ravioli is best described as Ravioli are stuffed pasta and Peirogi are stuffed dumplings.

In Poland at least there are many types, indeed Krakow (about 60 miles from where I am posting from) have a annual festival.

The Peirogi being described here are known as Russian peirogi, these are smilar to Russian and Ukranian varenki.

The cheese should be curd, not hard cheese like cheddar and the onions are usually pre-fried.

Jewish pirogen are similar but usually closer to tortellini or ravioli than the dumpling texture of peirogi.

Why does any of this matter?

Well, if you want what you call peirogi then you need a different base pasta than what the polish call peirogi ...

Just like pasta creating the lighter (less doughy) Jewish ones (which I guess are closer to the American Peirogi) will need a lighter flour ....

The Polish ones can be made quite easily from 50/50 buckwheat and rice flour ... this is the same base I use for polish noodles for soup.

The result is somewhat chewier than the Jewish version or Italian ravioli.

You can get away without egg if you are egg free but salt and the 50/50 flour mixed to a dough works.

For Christmas two types are served in Poland:

Sauerkraut and dried mushrooms filling for a general one

A special one filled with dried wild mushrooms (and a little onion, breadcrumbs and butter) is served in Poland (incl. the historical three polands), The Ukraine and Russia. This is served with a clear borscht soup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Unfortunately I can't comment on American Peirogi but I expect these have a passing similarity to slavic peirogi in the same way American Pizza looks similar to Italian Pizza.

Anyway: In Poland Peirogi are huge .. not in size but cultural cuisine.

The relationship with Italian Ravioli is best described as Ravioli are stuffed pasta and Peirogi are stuffed dumplings.

In Poland at least there are many types, indeed Krakow (about 60 miles from where I am posting from) have a annual festival.

The Peirogi being described here are known as Russian peirogi, these are smilar to Russian and Ukranian varenki.

The cheese should be curd, not hard cheese like cheddar and the onions are usually pre-fried.

Jewish pirogen are similar but usually closer to tortellini or ravioli than the dumpling texture of peirogi.

Why does any of this matter?

Well, if you want what you call peirogi then you need a different base pasta than what the polish call peirogi ...

Just like pasta creating the lighter (less doughy) Jewish ones (which I guess are closer to the American Peirogi) will need a lighter flour ....

The Polish ones can be made quite easily from 50/50 buckwheat and rice flour ... this is the same base I use for polish noodles for soup.

The result is somewhat chewier than the Jewish version or Italian ravioli.

You can get away without egg if you are egg free but salt and the 50/50 flour mixed to a dough works.

For Christmas two types are served in Poland:

Sauerkraut and dried mushrooms filling for a general one

A special one filled with dried wild mushrooms (and a little onion, breadcrumbs and butter) is served in Poland (incl. the historical three polands), The Ukraine and Russia. This is served with a clear borscht soup.

The pierogi we get here are filled pasta. Usually potato and onion or potato and cheese.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

×