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Glamour

What Things Have Gluten In Them That You Would Not Expect

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I think I have been glutened by Garden Fresh Gourmet and Margaritaville Tortilla chips as well as Cheetos.

Trying to be pure about gluten-free is not easy.

What about tricky teas and coffees, cooking oils, tomato sauces,, etc.

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I don't have a problems with Cheetos, gluten wise.

I order a hot dog at a resturant today and they said it was Gwaltney - ok. Then they put them in the fryer to cook them....Darn, how to ruin a good thing.

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I don't have a problems with Cheetos, gluten wise.

I order a hot dog at a resturant today and they said it was Gwaltney - ok. Then they put them in the fryer to cook them....Darn, how to ruin a good thing.

Cheetos has MSG in them...I stay CLEAR of MSG.

Basically I've gathered that msg is a neurotransmitter that makes you think what you're eating tastes good, lol.

Also, reading up on some of this garbage I read about poor lab rats. Some freakazoid-animal-testing-nutso was injecting dosages of MSG that was 4x the weight of the newborn rat, inducing brain lesions and a variety of other physiological effects.

However, the dosages of MSG used in the experiments (which they call "studies") were extremely high and the methods of injection, as well as force-feeding, do not accurately represent the way humans consume MSG."

:angry: So basically the baby rats were being subjected to all that JUST to see what will happen. Ugh. Makes me so mad.

Anyways, one other item is the food lion brand bratwurst. I eat them...but was reassured by a food lion meat-man that the "natural seasonings" were nothing to worry about. Can't seem to get a definite on it.

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Be particularly wary of ketchup, all sauces, salad dressings, seasonings, especially blends. I have even found gluten in marmalade and preserves, ham and lunch meats, here in NZ even bacon, sausages of course (though soy has become more of a problem in these :rolleyes: ). That's my particular gluten lists (although I have others for soy and corn and lactose and.... :P ) :lol:

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I think I have been glutened by Garden Fresh Gourmet and Margaritaville Tortilla chips as well as Cheetos.

Trying to be pure about gluten-free is not easy.

What about tricky teas and coffees, cooking oils, tomato sauces,, etc.

Margaritaville Tortilla Chips

Ingredients:

WHOLE WHITE CORN, VEGETABLE OIL, CANOLA OIL AND/OR SOYBEAN OIL AND/OR SUNFLOWER OIL, SALT, MALTODEXTRIN, LIME JUICE, LIME OIL, SUGAR, DEXTROSE, CITRIC ACID, SODIUM DIACETATE, PARTIALLY HYDROGENATED SOYBEAN OIL, CORN STARCH, GUM ARABIC AND GLYCEROL

Perhaps it's the soybean oil...or corn...

I don't buy flavored coffees, only whole bean. Teas I buy loose leaf. I use olive oil and canola oil for cooking. Tomato sauces? Hunts or Del Monte is safe.

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Perhaps it's the soybean oil...or corn...

Corn? I thought corn was safe. :huh:

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Corn? I thought corn was safe. :huh:

Corn is safe from a purely celiac perspective. The protein in corn does not cause the autoimmune reaction of celiac disease (neither does soy). However, it is common for celiacs to have other sensitivities. Corn is not as common as casein (milk) or soy, but it does affect a number of celiac.

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Be particularly wary of ketchup, all sauces, salad dressings, seasonings, especially blends. I have even found gluten in marmalade and preserves, ham and lunch meats, here in NZ even bacon, sausages of course (though soy has become more of a problem in these :rolleyes: ). That's my particular gluten lists (although I have others for soy and corn and lactose and.... :P ) :lol:

Perhaps this so in New Zealand but in the U.S. everything you name is almost without exception gluten-free. There are a few salad dressings with gluten, but the gluten is pretty much always listed. Seasoning blends can have gluten, but it's rare and it's listed. There's exactly one bacon that I know of that has gluten (it's clearly listed) and the fake bacon at McDonald's has gluten. Ham, lunch meats and sausages are almost all safe and the gluten is listed if not.

richard

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Perhaps this so in New Zealand but in the U.S. everything you name is almost without exception gluten-free. There are a few salad dressings with gluten, but the gluten is pretty much always listed. Seasoning blends can have gluten, but it's rare and it's listed. There's exactly one bacon that I know of that has gluten (it's clearly listed) and the fake bacon at McDonald's has gluten. Ham, lunch meats and sausages are almost all safe and the gluten is listed if not.

richard

If this is so, Richard, why do all the recipes from the U.S. specify gluten free ham, gluten free salad dressing, gluten free ketchup? Why does everyone say to only use McCormicks seasonings because they are the only ones that are safe. Why do people take their own salad dressings to restaurants? It must be because these products often have gluten in them. I was merely suggesting to Glamour things she should be sure to check the labels on, or ask about in restaurants, since that is what she seemed to be asking for, not telling her to NOT eat them!

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I have found ... nothing I can think of, actually, that had gluten in it but it wasn't listed in the ingredients. Of course, it depends on how thoroughly you read ingredients, what any given countries regulations are, and if you have any other sensitivities.

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Perhaps this so in New Zealand but in the U.S. everything you name is almost without exception gluten-free. There are a few salad dressings with gluten, but the gluten is pretty much always listed. Seasoning blends can have gluten, but it's rare and it's listed. There's exactly one bacon that I know of that has gluten (it's clearly listed) and the fake bacon at McDonald's has gluten. Ham, lunch meats and sausages are almost all safe and the gluten is listed if not.

richard

I kinda took that the same way and was going to say to just read labels and look up any questionable ingredients. But I didn't want to heat any pots up, ya know?

I thought only real deli meats like Deitz & Watson and Willshire Farms, Applegate Farms, Hormel were the safe ones. There are a few others, can't remember them all.

If this is so, Richard, why do all the recipes from the U.S. specify gluten free ham, gluten free salad dressing, gluten free ketchup? Why does everyone say to only use McCormicks seasonings because they are the only ones that are safe. Why do people take their own salad dressings to restaurants? It must be because these products often have gluten in them. I was merely suggesting to Glamour things she should be sure to check the labels on, or ask about in restaurants, since that is what she seemed to be asking for, not telling her to NOT eat them!

mushroom, I don't think he was trying to correct you or contradict, just sometimes some of the newbies to the celiac thing might need it broken down barney the purple dinosaur-style. If I was reading it for the first time, I would be like, "oh crap...are you serious?"

But usually people will look for the label that says gluten free OR recognize wheat in the ingredient lists, so I'm just assuming that some might not. And if at a restaurant I would hope someone would either ask what brand condiment it is OR just not use it at all. But that's just me.

You are correct in your statement though. So is richard.

:)

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mushroom, I don't think he was trying to correct you or contradict, just sometimes some of the newbies to the celiac thing might need it broken down barney the purple dinosaur-style. If I was reading it for the first time, I would be like, "oh crap...are you serious?"

The first time I ate ham that I found had gluten in it, I was like, "oh crap..are you serious?" :lol: Same for the marmalade!! :rolleyes:

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I think that is the typical reaction for most of us here when we find we've been glutened! :lol:

"Oh crap! Are you SERIOUS?"

I think I'm going to add that to my signature :)

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you can find me in the supermarket aisles with a magnifying glass (it's an age thing) reading label after label, that's why i tend to stick to fresh non-processed foods. FRESH is best :P

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I think I have been glutened by Garden Fresh Gourmet and Margaritaville Tortilla chips as well as Cheetos.

Trying to be pure about gluten-free is not easy.

What about tricky teas and coffees, cooking oils, tomato sauces,, etc.

I have also been glutened by cheetos but not every time. I think it is a CC issue with those so I consider any Lay's products to be like playing roulettee.

The most surprising glutening I had to date was with a juice product that turned out to have barley in the 'natural flavors'. I started checking anything with those words after that.

There are some teas also that are processed using barley so I stick with Celestial Seasonings teas, they label all the ones that are gluten free.

I have not found a cooking oil that wasn't safe gluten wise but many have soy oil in them so I use either olive oil or Canola or Sunflower Oil.

I stick with Delmonte tomato sauces, they do have a couple of them that are not gluten free, the ones with meat flavoring added, those are clearly labeled as having wheat in the allergen line.

I have learned that gluten can hide in most anything and when in doubt I always call a company before I use it.

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What I am puzzled about and it makes me very wary, is the verbal speech I got from Oscar Mayer/Kraft foods today. If they are so confident of the products, why don't they say Gluten Free?

They say they will break down an ingredient in parenthesis or say wheat.

Same with chip manufacturers. If the chip has corn, sea salt and oil, where is the gluten contamination possibility coming from? They won't commit to saying gluten-free. Green Mountain Gringo commits to gluten-free on package.

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you can find me in the supermarket aisles with a magnifying glass (it's an age thing) reading label after label, that's why i tend to stick to fresh non-processed foods. FRESH is best :P

Haha! You can find me in the supermarket aisles with my cell phone, calling the 1-800 numbers on the back of each label before I put it in my cart...people must think I'm crazy! ;)

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What I am puzzled about and it makes me very wary, is the verbal speech I got from Oscar Mayer/Kraft foods today. If they are so confident of the products, why don't they say Gluten Free?

They say they will break down an ingredient in parenthesis or say wheat.

Same with chip manufacturers. If the chip has corn, sea salt and oil, where is the gluten contamination possibility coming from? They won't commit to saying gluten-free. Green Mountain Gringo commits to gluten-free on package.

Different companies have different policies as far as labeling goes. Some companies will tell you if gluten containing items are made in the same plant, you usually read that on a label as "manufactured in the same plant as wheat, soy" or you will see "May contain traces of wheat, soy etc". This form of labeling is not required. If one of the major allergens is an ingredient that must be listed but not the CC warning. Also barley is not considered one of the major allergens but is used in many products hidden under natural flavors. Kraft and Oscar Myer are pretty good at labeling and won't hide gluten ingredients.

Those corn chips may have been made on the same line with a gluten product and picked up small amounts at the plant. Different celiacs will react differently to CC in products. For some they become just as sick as if the ate a slice of bread. Others will be able to tolerate with no problem.

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Also, we live in a law-suit happy society. Even though there are no gluten ingredients, companies don't list a product as gluten free unless they test.

Learning to read labels, can give you the confidence to make informed choices.

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Even though there are no gluten ingredients, companies don't list a product as gluten free unless they test.

Just to be clear, just because a product says "Gluten Free" on the label it does not mean they have tested it for gluten. Some test and label as such, but others can claim Gluten Free without testing. There are no laws regulating that yet.

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Just to be clear, just because a product says "Gluten Free" on the label it does not mean they have tested it for gluten. Some test and label as such, but others can claim Gluten Free without testing. There are no laws regulating that yet.

We also have to keep in mind that the gluten free label doesn't mean that there is no gluten at all even if they do test. Most companies go by 20ppm or less if they do test. Some of us will react even to that small amount. Rice Dream is an example of an item that says gluten free but still has small amounts of barley that don't legally need to be disclosed. Labeling laws here in the US have a long way to go when it comes to the gluten issue.

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