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The Most Delicious Home-made Gluten Free Bread I've Ever Tasted...


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Has anyone tried it without the flax meal? I can't tolerate flax.

I haven't, but I have wondered if using Quinoa flakes would work as well.

Valda

Enterolab results: ...two genes for gluten intolerance ...casein intolerance

other sensitivities: corn, eggs, soy, potato, tapioca

Hypoglycemic

Sensitivity to high EMFs [electromagnetic frequency] (limits my time in front of the computer)

Living a healthier, happier life.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me.Psalm 139: 9,10

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This is the first time that I made it with water instead of milk and the first time that I am having the high rise/flop problem. Anyone else notice this difference between milk vs. water or do you think it is a coincidence?

I have only used water, and all three times it fell. Hummm!

Valda

Enterolab results: ...two genes for gluten intolerance ...casein intolerance

other sensitivities: corn, eggs, soy, potato, tapioca

Hypoglycemic

Sensitivity to high EMFs [electromagnetic frequency] (limits my time in front of the computer)

Living a healthier, happier life.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me.Psalm 139: 9,10

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I've only used water. The first time I used Annalise Roberts bread flour mix along with her muffin mix (for the extra 1/4 cup, instead of garfava). I wonder if that weighed it down enough to keep it from rising and falling so much. I don't think I let it rise the whole 80 minutes either. I may have used all bread flour mix.

The last two times I've used the bread flour mix with amaranth and it fell both times. I did let these last two batches rise the 80 minutes and it rose to the top of the pan.

Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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Breadmaker newbie here. The only other recipe I've tried, just had me mix the wet and dry ingredients separately, then throw them together into the breadmaker, which then mixed it all up. Do I need to mix this recipe outside, or do I do the same thing I've done before?

Also, how do I know when to reach down through the batter to remove the kneading paddle? My first loaf I forgot all about it, and lost a couple slices to it...

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This topic has generated an amazing response, over 100 postings and still going strong. At first there was a lot of discussion as to what ingredients to use and now it's a rising/falling issue. Now that I have just about every ingredient there is (I'm sure there are more I'll need), I would like to try this recipe. What's preventing me from attempting it however, is the ambiguity of the first ingredient. What exactly is "1 1/4 cups gluten-free flour"? I don't want to just guess or make up something. Obviously, it can't contain any of the next three ingredients, or they wouldn't be listed seperately.

1 1/4 cups gluten-free flour

1/4 cup garfava flour

1/2 cup potato starch

1/4 cup cornstarch

Don't want to be a pain in the tookas. I apologize if I somehow missed one of the posts that specifies this. But I would be most appreciative if we could get the actual creater of this recipe to let us know what the original recipe calls for. Thank you so much.

best regards, lm

gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

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I used water the first time and warm milk the second time and it still gets huge until I take it out of the oven, then it falls.

I'm still hoping to find out how to avoid that problem. I will try less liquid.

Juanita

I've had this happen before (not with this bread but with other gluten-free breads) and found I wasn't cooking it long enough. This particular recipe is very moist. I'd try cooking it longer (I think I cook it 10 minutes longer myself come to think of it). You don't have to worry about drying it out. Oh, and have you checked your oven temperature to see if it's accurate? Lots of ovens aren't. You can buy an oven thermometer to verify.

Also if you're using scoop-type measuring cups (intended for dry ingredients) for your liquids you might be putting too much liquid in. Liquid can come up over the edge of the scoop-type cups and hold a lot more than you might think. Try comparing to a liquid measuring cup and see. Also make sure you're using large eggs (not extra-large).

Just some ideas.

Happy baking!

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larry,

in the original version, i used (for the gluten free flour) amaranth or bob's red mill all purpose gluten-free. i've also used rice when making it for other people in a bind, and sometimes i add teff if i am changing the taste.

although now that all these others have made my bread, i am sure that there are tonnes of combos floating around.

laurie

Gluten-free, Vegan

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larry, in the original version, i used (for the gluten free flour) amaranth or bob's red mill all purpose gluten-free. i've also used rice when making it for other people in a bind, and sometimes i add teff if i am changing the taste. although now that all these others have made my bread, i am sure that there are tonnes of combos floating around.laurie

Thanks Laurie, I don't have any excuse now, do I? I'm really going to try it.

yours truly, lm

gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

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What exactly is "1 1/4 cups gluten-free flour"? I don't want to just guess or make up something. Obviously, it can't contain any of the next three ingredients, or they wouldn't be listed seperately.

The gluten-free flour in the recipe would be any G.F. blend than you either purchased or mixed up yourself. So, yes, you would then use the other starches irregardless of what's in your flour blend.

Here's some gluten-free flour blends from Carol Fenster:

Carol Fenster's Flours

Valda

Enterolab results: ...two genes for gluten intolerance ...casein intolerance

other sensitivities: corn, eggs, soy, potato, tapioca

Hypoglycemic

Sensitivity to high EMFs [electromagnetic frequency] (limits my time in front of the computer)

Living a healthier, happier life.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me.Psalm 139: 9,10

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The gluten-free flour in the recipe would be any G.F. blend than you either purchased or mixed up yourself. So, yes, you would then use the other starches irregardless of what's in your flour blend.

Here's some gluten-free flour blends from Carol Fenster:

Carol Fenster's Flours

If one takes that approach, and uses one of these ingredients for part of the 1 1/4 C gluten-free flour,

1/4 cup garfava flour

1/2 cup potato starch

1/4 cup cornstarch

then the recipe just doesn't make sense to me. Think about it, what meaning does 1/4 C of this, or 1/2 C of that have, if one is williy nilly also using these same ingredients to "make up" the first 1 1/4 C flour blend. I'm not saying one couldn't do that and still have a great product. All I'm proposing is a basic question, can one say here's a recipe, make up whatever you want for part of it. Have 100 people make up different things, and then make valid, repeatable evaluations of that recipe.

I may bring a different perspective to this. I've worked in laboratories almost my whole life. We use recipes, that's what they're really called. And believe me when I say there is no varying from the measurements. You follow them exactly as specified, or you will not get results from your tests that are repeatable, verifiable, or valid. It's all chemistry. Nobody following the recipe need know anything about chemistry (or baking), just how to follow directions. Only the recipe writer has to know what they're doing. They have to know the chemistry, or to have tested the recipes and created the best bread, or whatever.

So, to sum up this discussion, I, as a cookbook reader, don't "make up" the recipes. I follow the recipes that are in the cookbook. Then, if I like the bread, muffins, or pancakes, great. Boy, that's a wonderful cookbook. If not, hey, that cookbook sucks. Maybe I should just keep my mouth shut and not be a troublemaker. I regret giving you a hard time Artgirl, as you were the first to welcome me here, and I thank you. It's just a coincidence you brought this up now, as this make up the gluten-free flour blend has been going on the whole post.

best regards, lm

gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

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larry,

i've never used those flour blends, and i created the recipe. not trying to be snarky (it might sound that way), but i wouldn't use those, personally, and expect it to be the same. as we all know, as gluten-free bakers, each flour works differently. that being said, i really would recommend one of the ones i suggested. good luck with the bread!

Gluten-free, Vegan

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Ok, sorry. I got sidetracked. Need to do more baking and less posting. Going in the kitchen now, I really am! lm

gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

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I figured out why my last two batches of bread fell.

I use Annalise Roberts flour blend which has the starches in it. The first time I made the bread I made it right......the last two batches I added the starches as listed so I actually had more starches than necessary.

I did it right this time (again). Bread didn't fall.

I also didn't use flax. I used amaranth for garfava and rice for flax. Haven't tried it yet though, so I don't know the flavor difference.

Once I run out of the millet flour I bought for Annalise's blend I'll try just the one flour.

Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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larry, i really would recommend one of the ones (flours) i suggested. good luck with the bread!

I made it and it turned out good. We all know how much we like warm, fresh made bread, so I'll have to make some comments tomorrow. But right now it has the best texture of any bread I've made so far. A very fine, yet soft, moist texture. Not a "quick bread" feel to it. Taste good. I like it.

Some differences with this bread recipe to my regular recipe. More flour and less starch. More different flours, I used six (x 1/4 C) + flax meal. Used milk instead of water. Oil vs butter, and honey vs sugar. So, there are many new things for me. It also has a wheat bread look to it (brown instead of yellow), probably from the teff, sorghum, garbanza, and flax meal. Very nutritious too, I feel good about that!

I let it rise just a tad over the top of the pan, and it fell the usual amount during baking, to about just below the top of the pan. Not excessive I would say. A success, always a good thing. I'm making this my new standard bread, and will stick with the main parts of the recipe, and maybe change up the 1-1/4 C flour mix, as per Laurie, Artgirl, and others suggestions.

thank you very much, lm

gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

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larry,

i've never used those flour blends, and i created the recipe. not trying to be snarky (it might sound that way), but i wouldn't use those, personally, and expect it to be the same. as we all know, as gluten-free bakers, each flour works differently. that being said, i really would recommend one of the ones i suggested. good luck with the bread!

Okay, Lorka, can you be specific about the 1-1/4 cups gluten-free flour.

If it's not a flour blend, what is it??? Is it just one flour, say, like rice flour? I did a quick search through this long thread and didn't find where you may have mentioned the actual flour you used. I looked at your bread page on the site and it doesn't say either. I'm really puzzled.

EDIT... oh, here's your post on the flour

in the original version, i used (for the gluten free flour) amaranth or bob's red mill all purpose gluten-free. i've also used rice when making it for other people in a bind, and sometimes i add teff if i am changing the taste.

I did make a loaf using the Bob's Red Mill all purpose G.F. baking flour. And I used all the other flours/starches listed in your recipe. This does double up on some of the ingredients, because the flour blend contains: garbanzo bean flour, potato starch, tapioca flour, white sorghum flour, fava bean flour.

So, to answer my own question, you sometimes use a blend, sometimes use only amaranth flour, and sometimes use only rice flour. And they all turn out fine.

Valda

Enterolab results: ...two genes for gluten intolerance ...casein intolerance

other sensitivities: corn, eggs, soy, potato, tapioca

Hypoglycemic

Sensitivity to high EMFs [electromagnetic frequency] (limits my time in front of the computer)

Living a healthier, happier life.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me.Psalm 139: 9,10

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So, to answer my own question, you sometimes use a blend, sometimes use only amaranth flour, and sometimes use only rice flour. And they all turn out fine.

hehe, yes. after i read this i thought my post hadn't gotten posted. those are the only three combinations i have used, but i think i did the rice flour only once, as i'm allergic to it, so i dont eat it then. i also do see that they double up, but amaranth flour is quite expensive, so sometimes, i have to make due because of my other allergies.

Gluten-free, Vegan

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Breadmaker newbie here. The only other recipe I've tried, just had me mix the wet and dry ingredients separately, then throw them together into the breadmaker, which then mixed it all up. Do I need to mix this recipe outside, or do I do the same thing I've done before?

Also, how do I know when to reach down through the batter to remove the kneading paddle? My first loaf I forgot all about it, and lost a couple slices to it...

You did it right. You don't remove the paddle until after the bread is baked. The bread will fall if you try to manipulate it before it's baked. You have to remove it carefully after the bread cools. All bread machine breads have a hole in them from the paddle.

HLA-DQ 3,1 (Subtype 8,6)

Antigliadin IgA 72

Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 49

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You did it right. You don't remove the paddle until after the bread is baked. The bread will fall if you try to manipulate it before it's baked. You have to remove it carefully after the bread cools. All bread machine breads have a hole in them from the paddle.

actually - before the second knead, wet your hand and you can stick it in and grab it, then wet a spatula to smooth the bread. i did this a few times, then attended a baking session with heather butt and donna washburn (authors from a few cookbooks), who said the same thing that i do. that way, you dont have the hole it it, and if you keep your hand wet, it won't stick and get messy.

Gluten-free, Vegan

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Re: the question of flours, for my bread (2 so far, first one pictured in my avatar) I used:

1 1/4 cups gluten-free flour which consisted of: 1/2 cup brown rice flour, 1/2 cup sorghum flour and 1/4 cup tapioca starch. Then the rest as indicated in the recipe. (1/4 cup garfava flour, 1/2 cup potato starch, 1/4 cup cornstarch, 1/4 cup flaxmeal)

So I used this:

1/4 cup garfava flour

1/2 cup potato starch

1/4 cup cornstarch

1/4 cup flaxmeal

1/2 cup brown rice flour

1/2 cup sorghum flour

1/4 cup tapioca starch

That is the recipe I will continue to use.

Linda, Mom to Ty (11 years old)

Ty was diagnosed by blood test June 7/05

biopsy Aug 11/05, diagnosis confirmed Aug 18/05

Mom, Dad and big brother Celiac-free.

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I looked more closely at my rice flour - it's sweet rice flour, not brown rice. So, do you think this would make a difference?

Valda

Enterolab results: ...two genes for gluten intolerance ...casein intolerance

other sensitivities: corn, eggs, soy, potato, tapioca

Hypoglycemic

Sensitivity to high EMFs [electromagnetic frequency] (limits my time in front of the computer)

Living a healthier, happier life.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me.Psalm 139: 9,10

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actually - before the second knead, wet your hand and you can stick it in and grab it, then wet a spatula to smooth the bread. i did this a few times, then attended a baking session with heather butt and donna washburn (authors from a few cookbooks), who said the same thing that i do. that way, you dont have the hole it it, and if you keep your hand wet, it won't stick and get messy.

Ok. That sounds fine, in theory, but how does the bread get kneaded the second time if you've pulled out the paddle.....that does the kneading? I can see trying to pull it out right before it goes to bake cycle but not while it's kneading...unless it doesn't matter with un-glutened bread? I might be still thinking in gluten terms.

HLA-DQ 3,1 (Subtype 8,6)

Antigliadin IgA 72

Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 49

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