Jump to content
  • Sign Up
0
nauseatingnancy

Wax On Fruit And Veggies

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

but I just found out that the wax they put on fruits and veggies MAY contain gluten, they cannot guarantee that it doesn't. I always wash fruits and veggies, as I am sure many do, but I don't know for those who are super sensitive, like my mom, may want to go organic. My mom only eats organic fruits/veggies now, and I just found out about this. Sorry if this has been posted before

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would you kindly post documentation about fruits and vegetable being coated with potential gluten?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I, too, would be interested in where you heard this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen this claim elsewhere and also that the wax may not be vegan as it may have insects in it. I have not however, seen any proof of this claim.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found it on the FDA's website

http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/...n/ucm111487.htm

It says: #

Are there examples of food products that are naturally "gluten-free"?

Yes. The following are examples of, but are not limited to, foods that are naturally gluten-free:

* milk; nonfat dry milk)

* 100 percent fruit or vegetable juices

* Fresh fruits and vegetables that are not coated with a wax or resin that contains gluten

* A variety of single ingredient foods: butter; eggs; lentils; peanuts; seeds like flax; tree nuts like almonds; non-gluten containing grains like corn; fresh fish like cod; fresh shellfish like clams; honey; and water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I posted a letter from the CA citrus growers association awhile back, which also suggested this is possible.

However, they did say that the gluten-containing waxes were more expensive and therefore not used very much.

Wash your fruit and veggies before you eat them! This is a good practice anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I found it on the FDA's website

http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/...n/ucm111487.htm

It says: #

Are there examples of food products that are naturally "gluten-free"?

Yes. The following are examples of, but are not limited to, foods that are naturally gluten-free:

* milk; nonfat dry milk)

* 100 percent fruit or vegetable juices

* Fresh fruits and vegetables that are not coated with a wax or resin that contains gluten

* A variety of single ingredient foods: butter; eggs; lentils; peanuts; seeds like flax; tree nuts like almonds; non-gluten containing grains like corn; fresh fish like cod; fresh shellfish like clams; honey; and water.

http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/...ucm106108.htm#i

I. Overview

A. Purpose

Accurate and informative labeling is critical for allergic consumers, individuals with celiac disease, and their families because they need to rely on strict avoidance of specific foods and ingredients to prevent potentially serious reactions. The Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004 (P.L. 108-282) (FALCPA) amends the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA) and requires that the label of a food product that is or contains an ingredient that bears or contains a "major food allergen " declare the presence of the allergen as specified by FALCPA. FALCPA defines a "major food allergen " as one of eight foods or food groups (milk, egg, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts, and soybeans) or a food ingredient that contains protein derived from one of those foods.

An important scientific issue associated with the implementation of FALCPA is the existence of threshold levels below which it is unlikely that a food allergic individual would experience an adverse effect. FALCPA provides two processes by which an ingredient may be exempted from the FALCPA labeling requirements, a petition process [21 U.S.C. 343(w)(6)] and a notification process [21 U.S.C. 343(w)(7)]. Under the petition process, an ingredient may be exempt if the petitioner demonstrates that the ingredient "does not cause an allergic reaction that poses a risk to human health." Under the notification process, an ingredient may be exempt if the notification contains scientific evidence that demonstrates that the ingredient "does not contain allergenic protein," or if FDA previously has determined, under section 409 of the FFDCA, that the food ingredient does not cause an allergic response that poses a risk to human health. Thus, understanding food allergen thresholds and developing a sound scientific framework for such thresholds are likely to be centrally important to FDA's analysis of, and response to, FALCPA petitions and notifications

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Conventionally grown fruits and vegetables are often waxed to prevent moisture loss, protect them from bruising during shipping, and increase their shelf life. When purchasing non-organic fruits and vegetables, you should ask your grocer about the kind of wax used on their surface even if you are going to peel it; CARNAUBA wax (from the carnauba palm tree), BEESWAX, and SHELLAC (from the lac beetle) are preferable to petroleum-based waxes, which contain solvent residues or wood rosins. Yet, it is not just the wax itself that may be of concern but the other compounds often added to it - ETHYL ALCOHOL or ETHANOL for consistency, MILK CASEIN (a protein linked to milk allergy) as "film formers" and soaps as flowing agents. "

Carnauba: gluten free, is also used for shoe polish, car polish, dental floss and cosmetics, but I did find out it is safe.

Beeswax: gluten free

Shellac: gluten free Shellac is edible and it is used as a glazing agent on pills, This coating may not be considered as vegetarian as it may, and probably does, contain crushed insects

However, as it states above, Ethyl alcohol or ethanol could be a compound added to some waxes, and that's where gluten can become a factor. Ethanol can be made from wheat. It is also made from corn and sugar, but can be made from wheat straw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not so concerned about the gluten, but that other stuff sounds nasty.

Wash your fruits and veggies...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"

However, as it states above, Ethyl alcohol or ethanol could be a compound added to some waxes, and that's where gluten can become a factor. Ethanol can be made from wheat. It is also made from corn and sugar, but can be made from wheat straw.

Ethanol is distilled and considered to be gluten free, regardless of the source.

Learning what's safe and what isn't, is not always easy. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well just wanted to bring this out there, my mom has a problem with fruits and veggies that are not organic so I thought some other people might, but I guess it's not a big concern to anyone else. Although it is gross.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well Nancy, thank you, it does bother me too. I read about strawberries being packed in straw and such, I don't agree with that either. I will not buy them now, unless I know where they came from, and such. We all have to think about these things, like it or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
but I just found out that the wax they put on fruits and veggies MAY contain gluten, they cannot guarantee that it doesn't. I always wash fruits and veggies, as I am sure many do, but I don't know for those who are super sensitive, like my mom, may want to go organic. My mom only eats organic fruits/veggies now, and I just found out about this. Sorry if this has been posted before

This has been a major problem for me too. It's been mysterious because their suppose to be safe, but I react so strongly. I've followed members advice and gone through the checklist of other potential problems with contamination, but it always comes back to the produce.

I checked the origin of some of these and found out that they are imported from New Zealand to Peru and I'm not sure how all that can be regulated by the FDA. I wash and peel, but still have a reaction even in post celiac utensils, pots and pans. I can nuke a veggie and still have a problem.

I'm 2 hours from available organic produce, but when I've used these, I do not have a problem.

I have nothing to document and still a newby to all of this so I can't advise anyone on anything. I can only say that your mom is not alone and if she reacts to whatever the culprit is, it can't be good for her.

I would love to hear input on this subject as well. Do we know what is put on imported produce? Is it regulated? Why doesn't produce have to list ingredients that sits on it's surface? Many countries, all 17 in Europe, require the genetically modified foods, label them as such. I wonder if all these chemicals and genetically modified versions have something to do with celiac and other 'new' diseases? Just wondering too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Testimony/ucm174793.htm

http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceCompliance...s/ucm064574.htm

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/98fr/05d-0490-gdl0001.pdf

Fresh fruit and vegtables in their natural state are not subject to Federal Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protections Act.

And lastly, a Canadian Article:

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/fssa/f...allergene.shtml

The CFIA reminds the industry to be aware of most common priority allergens such as peanuts; tree nuts; sesame seeds; milk; eggs; soy; fish and shellfish, crustaceans; wheat; gluten; and sulphite. These priority allergens and any proteins derived from them should not be used as components of fruit and vegetable coatings because there are no labelling requirements to declare coating or wax components on the fresh produce. Therefore there would be no warning for an allergic consumer about the presence of these priority allergens on the fresh produce.

OKay, I'll go away now. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Testimony/ucm174793.htm

http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceCompliance...s/ucm064574.htm

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/98fr/05d-0490-gdl0001.pdf

Fresh fruit and vegtables in their natural state are not subject to Federal Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protections Act.

And lastly, a Canadian Article:

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/fssa/f...allergene.shtml

The CFIA reminds the industry to be aware of most common priority allergens such as peanuts; tree nuts; sesame seeds; milk; eggs; soy; fish and shellfish, crustaceans; wheat; gluten; and sulphite. These priority allergens and any proteins derived from them should not be used as components of fruit and vegetable coatings because there are no labelling requirements to declare coating or wax components on the fresh produce. Therefore there would be no warning for an allergic consumer about the presence of these priority allergens on the fresh produce.

OKay, I'll go away now. :rolleyes:

Thank you so much for this information. I have driven myself crazy using myself as a test subject. Do you know if organic produce has wax on it too? And, do you know of any way to remove it ? Even when I'm cooking it the steam makes me dizzy and my heart starts pounding. I have to leave the kitchen entirely.

So, I'm glad you came and please don't go away:)

Ann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well just wanted to bring this out there, my mom has a problem with fruits and veggies that are not organic so I thought some other people might, but I guess it's not a big concern to anyone else. Although it is gross.

Actually, any potentially correct information about gluten is a concern to those of us with celiac disease....no one is blowing you off! However, I was end stage Celiac and extremely ill at time of diagnosis so any trace amounts of gluten would really screw me up, to put it bluntly. I eat enough fruits and veggies every day to choke a horse...it's the mainstay of my diet. I wash everything really well, as everyone should, and am very healthy and asymptomatic these days. It isn't possible for any gluten to be in the wax, otherwise I'd be in the hospital by now. That's just common sense.

People often assume if they are having issues again it must be from gluten. Your mom could be allergic or intolerant to another ingredient in the wax and that could cause similar symptoms. Although buying organic would be great for everyone, it isn't possible for many because of cost. I mix organics with non-organic, depending upon what the fruit or veggie is. Otherwise, my grocery bill would be even higher than it already is! :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Actually, any potentially correct information about gluten is a concern to those of us with celiac disease....no one is blowing you off! However, I was end stage Celiac and extremely ill at time of diagnosis so any trace amounts of gluten would really screw me up, to put it bluntly. I eat enough fruits and veggies every day to choke a horse...it's the mainstay of my diet. I wash everything really well, as everyone should, and am very healthy and asymptomatic these days. It isn't possible for any gluten to be in the wax, otherwise I'd be in the hospital by now. That's just common sense.

People often assume if they are having issues again it must be from gluten. Your mom could be allergic or intolerant to another ingredient in the wax and that could cause similar symptoms. Although buying organic would be great for everyone, it isn't possible for many because of cost. I mix organics with non-organic, depending upon what the fruit or veggie is. Otherwise, my grocery bill would be even higher than it already is! :(

And, as someone just asked, how do you know your organic produce isn't also coated with something?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm learning a lot, in my travels through this thread.... :P

http://www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/ucm114299

Q & As about Fresh Produce

Q What is "organic produce"?

A Organic produce is grown without using most conventional pesticides; fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge; bioengineering; or ionizing radiation.

Before a product can be labeled "organic," a government-approved certifier inspects the farm where the food is grown to make sure the farmer meets the U.S. Department of Agriculture's organic standards. Companies that handle or process organic food before it reaches the supermarket or restaurant must be certified, too.

Q What is ethylene gas - and how does it affect produce?

A Some fruits and vegetables - like bananas - naturally produce ethylene gas when they ripen. Oftentimes, such fruits and vegetables are harvested in the unripened state to preserve firmness and for long shelf life; they are later exposed to ethylene gas to induce ripening.

Q What does the "use-by" date mean on a package of fresh produce?

A "Best-If-Used-By- (or Before)" date is the last date recommended for peak quality as determined by the manufacturer of the product.

Q Why are wax coatings used on fruits and vegetables?

A Many vegetables and fruits make their own natural waxy coating. After harvest, fresh produce may be washed to clean off dirt and soil - but such washing also removes the natural wax. Therefore, waxes are applied to some produce to replace the natural waxes that are lost.

Wax coatings help retain moisture to maintain quality from farm to table including:

when produce is shipped from farm to market

while it is in the stores and restaurants

once it is in the home

Waxes also help inhibit mold growth, protect produce from bruising, prevent other physical damage and disease, and enhance appearance.

Q How are waxes applied?

A Waxes are used only in tiny amounts to provide a microscopic coating surrounding the entire product. Each piece of waxed produce has only a drop or two of wax.

Coatings used on fruits and vegetables must meet FDA food additive regulations for safety. Produce shippers and supermarkets in the United States are required by federal law to label fresh fruits and vegetables that have been waxed so you will know whether the produce you buy is coated. Watch for signs that say: "Coated with food-grade vegetable-, petroleum-, beeswax-, or shellac- based wax or resin, to maintain freshness."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm learning a lot, in my travels through this thread.... :P

http://www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/ucm114299

Q & As about Fresh Produce

Q What is "organic produce"?

A Organic produce is grown without using most conventional pesticides; fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge; bioengineering; or ionizing radiation.

Before a product can be labeled "organic," a government-approved certifier inspects the farm where the food is grown to make sure the farmer meets the U.S. Department of Agriculture's organic standards. Companies that handle or process organic food before it reaches the supermarket or restaurant must be certified, too.

Q What is ethylene gas - and how does it affect produce?

A Some fruits and vegetables - like bananas - naturally produce ethylene gas when they ripen. Oftentimes, such fruits and vegetables are harvested in the unripened state to preserve firmness and for long shelf life; they are later exposed to ethylene gas to induce ripening.

Q What does the "use-by" date mean on a package of fresh produce?

A "Best-If-Used-By- (or Before)" date is the last date recommended for peak quality as determined by the manufacturer of the product.

Q Why are wax coatings used on fruits and vegetables?

A Many vegetables and fruits make their own natural waxy coating. After harvest, fresh produce may be washed to clean off dirt and soil - but such washing also removes the natural wax. Therefore, waxes are applied to some produce to replace the natural waxes that are lost.

Wax coatings help retain moisture to maintain quality from farm to table including:

when produce is shipped from farm to market

while it is in the stores and restaurants

once it is in the home

Waxes also help inhibit mold growth, protect produce from bruising, prevent other physical damage and disease, and enhance appearance.

Q How are waxes applied?

A Waxes are used only in tiny amounts to provide a microscopic coating surrounding the entire product. Each piece of waxed produce has only a drop or two of wax.

Coatings used on fruits and vegetables must meet FDA food additive regulations for safety. Produce shippers and supermarkets in the United States are required by federal law to label fresh fruits and vegetables that have been waxed so you will know whether the produce you buy is coated. Watch for signs that say: "Coated with food-grade vegetable-, petroleum-, beeswax-, or shellac- based wax or resin, to maintain freshness."

I look forward to the day when I'm well enough and smart enough to help others the way you and others have helped me. Thank you so much.

Ann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I look forward to the day when I'm well enough and smart enough to help others the way you and others have helped me. Thank you so much.

Ann

;) You will, and then it will be your turn to "pay it forward".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oranges and some apples have it but I cannot substantiate that in any way. Someone on this board informed me of that a few years ago so I try to avoid those fruits. Grapefruit may also have it but I am not sure. Raw cherries go down the best for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
However, I was end stage Celiac and extremely ill at time of diagnosis so any trace amounts of gluten would really screw me up, to put it bluntly

There is no such thing as "end stage celiac", you either are celiac, or you are gluten intolerant. Celiac is not the end stage of gluten intolerance, that has never been proven. There are different levels of sensitivity, which many of us are much more sensitive than others. Gemini is much more sensitive, as is Patty, me, and many others. Some say I am not celiac, yet, I can't have any gluten. I can't eat any of the labeled "gluten free" foods, like crackers, cookies, cakes...they all contain a certain minimal amount of gluten, which I just can not tolerate. I can't eat any grains for the same reason.

I do eat apples, oranges, grapefruits...all peeled of course. I never eat the peeling on an apple, not because I am afraid of gluten, but because I have never liked the peel. I have been glutened by chips, crackers, cookies, macaroni, rice, OTC meds labeled gluten free, etc, yet never by any fresh fruit. Maybe I have been lucky, and never gotten any with the wax containing gluten, and I hope I never do. My diet is very limited, and I certainly do not want to give up my apples.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oranges and some apples have it but I cannot substantiate that in any way. Someone on this board informed me of that a few years ago so I try to avoid those fruits. Grapefruit may also have it but I am not sure. Raw cherries go down the best for me.

My daughter ate some black cherries we got from Cost.. and she ended up in the ER. I was told by Cost.. that they import some of their produce and this batch was from ?? Sorry, I don't remember. Anywho, her face and throat swelled so much that her eyes were only a slit and she couldn't breathe. The cherries were rinsed but not throughly washed as I recall. They had DDT on them. I got that straight from Cost.. In many, many countries, it is legal to use this pesticide and it doesn't matter if you have celiac or not; it's toxic.

If you will look through this thread, you will see differing opinions, publications and experiences. I believe they are all valid whether or not it is gluten; it's harmful. Some of us can and some can't eat fresh, whole, mainstreamed produce. Since produce isn't required to reveal it's full content, I suppose we won't know until the law is changed. I have looked at what others have to say that live in Europe, Japan and Canada and their laws are stricter. Makes you wonder why??? GMO's for one.

I'm not a researcher by nature, but there are some very intelligent, educated and experienced people here who like/love doing research. I hope one of those will see this and make it a mission......please??

I feel badly for you because I know you have to go through a lot of misery and trial-and-error to find culprits, as we all do. Be well. Have a wonderful evening.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There is no such thing as "end stage celiac", you either are celiac, or you are gluten intolerant.

Not everyone would agree with that statement. If you are celiac, then there are varying degrees of damage to the villi. The Marsh scale measures villi damage. Four (4) is the most severe, and is sometimes called "end stage." At Marsh 4 the villi have been destroyed. Malabsorption is severe, and extreme nutrient deficiencies are evident. Symptoms are severe. A celiac at Marsh 1 may be asymptomatic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not everyone would agree with that statement. If you are celiac, then there are varying degrees of damage to the villi. The Marsh scale measures villi damage. Four (4) is the most severe, and is sometimes called "end stage." At Marsh 4 the villi have been destroyed. Malabsorption is severe, and extreme nutrient deficiencies are evident. Symptoms are severe. A celiac at Marsh 1 may be asymptomatic.

Sorry, but I have never seen this to be proven either. Gluten intolerant people suffer malabsorption, and extreme nutrient deficiencies just the same. Symptoms are severe for them too. I do realize there are varing degrees of villi damage, just as there are varing degrees of damage to non-celiac gluten intolerants. As I have said, my sister is a diagnosed celiac, she had severe iron deficiency. I am dealing with iron deficiency, and I also deal with B12 deficiency. Gluten is the enemy, for all of us.

In many, many countries, it is legal to use this pesticide and it doesn't matter if you have celiac or not; it's toxic.

That's quite scary. I love gala apples from Chili, maybe not anymore. :(

Since produce isn't required to reveal it's full content, I suppose we won't know until the law is changed.

This is scary too, and very true. The FDA laws are very sketchy, to say the least.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

×