ch88

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About ch88

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  1. I take a complete multivitamin, fish oil (for extra omega-3 fatty acids), and extra niacin. It is common for people with celiac disease to be deficient in vitamins and minerals. It can also take a while for the body to absorb different vitamins and distribute them to proper cells. The body can convert neurotransmitter precursors into niacin if deficient. Other food in tolerances are linked to emotional problems. You can google "h pylori natural remedies" Citric acid is in lots of fruits and vegetables and I wouldn't think it would be a problem. Maybe it is a problem with other ingredients? I don't do well with processed food or natural flavors or carmel color, I don't think. I am guessing it is a corn sensitivity issue for me. I avoid dairy, grain, legumes, and processed food. I just eat fruit, vegetables and meat. That seems to work best so far. Otherwise I get confused and irritable.
  2. I just use regular (banana boat) sunscreen. I don't think that any sunscreen contains gluten but I could be wrong. Someone else here might know more about that. Touching gluten is safe so long as it doesn't end up in the mouth.
  3. A lot of foods such as fruit contain citric acid. It is unlikely that citric acid should be a problem for anyone with a corn allergy as it contains no protein. I can't eat corn very well, but haven't noticed any problems with critic acid.
  4. It probably depends on the person. I think there is some tolerance. You may be able to get away with eating one crumb per day, or something, without it destroying your gut. That is not recommended though. It takes up to 2 weeks to heal the gut if you are healthy and a lot longer in some cases. https://tinyurl.com/y9774l9q
  5. I have done research on the topic. I agree that the idea of cross reactivity is a myth. The vast majority of people with Celiac disease are able to heal their gut by by eliminating gluten from there diet. If they don't recover on a gluten free diet it is called refractory Celiac disease. My understanding though is that refractory Celiac disease is very rare. If other foods caused cross reaction it would be very common. Other foods sensitivities can be serious though in some cases. There are autoimmune disorders that are linked to other food sensitivities besides gluten. How the body and the immune system work is complex. Many things can cause digestive trouble. If food moves through the digestive system to quickly there is not enough time to absorb vitamin b12. I can see why other foods, besides gluten, might be a problem for some people for this reason and for other reasons.
  6. ch88

    Psychosis Episode

    A few other things that may be helpful include: Stress reduction techniques. There are some websites that offer helpful advice on the topic. Eating more fish as it is high in omega-3 fatty acids. Glutamine powder (food for the gut) Eating lots of fruit and vegetables. Grapefruit, for example, has lots of inositol which may improve cognitive function. Fruit and veggies are high in flavinoids which are beneficial.
  7. ch88

    Psychosis Episode

    Are you sure that gluten caused the psychosis episode? A sudden psychotic episode can be caused by other medical problems so you should talk to a doctor about it. There is also the psychforums.com forum which is a good resource. It is possible for someone to develop schizophrenia at any time. Gluten can cause panic attacks in some people and some people are more likely to have food sensitivities than other people. There is a link between digestive problems and anxiety or panic attacks. Autistic people are more likely to have digestive problems than normal. Some people think that autistic people would do better on a wheat free diet. This has been tested though and they didn't find any improvement in general. Also a study that I read found no statistically significant correlation between celiac disease and autism. There are definitely exceptions though to this rule. However, people with schizophrenia are much much more likely to be celiac than people without it. Other food sensitivities or allergies are strongly linked to schizophrenia. The ones that I have read about are corn, dairy, soy, sugar, caffeine and gluten. Another diet that removes all questionable ingredients is the AIP diet. There is medication that is available to treat different types of anxiety disorders. I recommend talking to a doctor about your episode. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3044191/
  8. I have lots of other food intolerance. I feel best if I avoid corn, soy, rice dairy and alcohol and other foods. I do not think my food in tolerances will go away. It would be nice to eat whatever I wanted. I try to look on the positive side though which is that there are still lots of things I can eat and I feel really good and healthy.
  9. I can get confusion or foggy brain on occasion. I think that avoiding grain, dairy, coffee/caffine, alcohol as well as stress engagement helps with that. If someone has seasonal allergies they may feel foggy or depressed. I think it is the same way for some other people. The particular foods that people react to may be different for different people though. A way to figure it out is to rotate what foods you eat for a week or two and see if you notice any changes. It is fairly common for someone with celiac disease to have other food sensitivities.
  10. I have had them and I didn't react. I think they are fine. Some sausages contain wheat though (beer flavoring) so check the label.
  11. Here is some more information on the topic from my research and things I have found online. Anything under 20 ppm gluten is generally considered safe for someone with celiac disease. I have never heard of any milk containing gluten contamination above 20 ppm. I don't know what the limit is for a wheat allergy but it may be much lower. Wheat is a common food allergy. Unless there is cross contamination that happens diary farm, there isn't any risk. Meat and blood is always gluten free even if the animal has been fed wheat. Very very very trace amounts of gluten can get into milk but they are below the threshold for celiac disease. https://www.glutenfreedietitian.com/gluten-peptides-in-human-breast-milk-implications-for-cows-milk/ Also if someone has the genes for for celiac disease they may or may not develop celiac disease at some point in their life. Screening for celiac disease is a good idea. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4720595/ https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/75/5/914/4689407
  12. I have heard some people can get disassociation after traumatic life experiences. Other people say that there disassociation was not caused by any event. There is a strong genetic component to mental illness, in some cases at least. Probably everyone with a mental disorder should be screened for celiac disease. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/diagnosis-diet/201706/ketogenic-diets-psychiatric-disorders-new-2017-review https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4083629/
  13. I never had ataxia but I did have confusion before I went gluten free. I feel very anxious within about 2 minutes of eating gluten. Before I went gluten free I was extremely paranoid about certain things but not other things. I could barely understand social interactions before I went gluten free. The anxiety comes back within a couple minutes. Other symptoms (like extreme hyperfocus) take a day or two before they come back. They last for about a week and then all of them go away. My symptoms cleared up about 90 to 95 percent. The differences that I still have are very minor in comparison but some are still there. Fortunately I don't have the emotional problems that I had before. I have been recovering in steps. Going gluten free helped and there were extreme changes the (things looked and sounded way different to me after I went gluten free) that happened suddenly. Others slowly went away over about a year. Eliminating cross contamination, and avoiding oats helped tons. Also I think if I avoid corn, milk, alchohol take L-glutamine powder, and a complete multivitamin/multi mineral tablet every day I feel best. I don't know if I have celiac disease, NCGS, and/or a wheat allergy. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3641836/
  14. L-glutamine is the primary food source for the cells that line the gut. The cells in the gut act differently when they have lots of food. Leaky gut is linked to inflammation and stress in the gut. In the link below, there is a diagram which shows how glutamine supplementation can lead to improved control over tight junctions within the gut. The idea is that L-glutamine supplementation increases the production of other proteins that help protect against leaky gut syndrome. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4369670/
  15. Did the Popsicle contain wheat? Celiac disease should not cause anaphylaxis. I am not a doctor though so this isn't medical advice. Food or chemical allergies can be dangerous. Celiac disease is a lot different from a food allergy although some symptoms can overlap. During an allergic reaction IGE antibodies are created along with histamine. Celiac disease can cause digestive problems in the stomach and intestine as well as a lot of other types of health problems. Shampoo and soap (unless they happen to have wheat in them and unless they get into your mouth somehow) should not cause problems for people with celiac disease.