Gail W

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About Gail W

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  1. The other alternative is just eliminating it from your diet and seeing if you do end up feeling better. There’s a chance your not celiacs and could be intolerant which is just as bad for reactions but can’t be proven with the celiac testing. It depends on how bad you would feel eating it every day for the next two months, especially moving into a new semester.
  2. I am the only one in my immediate family (out of my 3 siblings and both parents) to have celiacs even thought I inherited the autoimmune thyroid issues from my parents, but have a second cousin who was diagnosed 8 years ago and that’s it.
  3. One other thought to consider is other food allergies/intolerances you may have that you didn’t know of before that could be causing this change. Is there any food that you may have added in or increased the frequency of eating since removing gluten from your diet? I know this has happened with me where I took our gluten, started eating more rice and still getting sick till I figured out I have a rice allergy as well!
  4. Hey I’m new here too- but totally get what your talking about! I have some friends that claim to be ‘gluten free’ but if they are hungry will eat a piece of bread and it can be frustrating to have them later complain to you about how hard it is to eat a gluten-free diet!
  5. Gail W

    How to cope

    I get how you feel, I was diagnosed almost 5 years ago and still find challenges to overcome especially when traveling with my friends. I get the feeling that sometimes it can seem to overshadow your life, but for me it has really shown me who some of my closest friends are as well. My friends always find it funny and joke that I eat my way thru school classes, because I ALWAYS have ‘me proof’ snacks on me to eat so I’m never hungry when I’m away from home for longer than I thought, or can’t get food while we’re on the go!!