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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

What Is Glutamine And Acidophilus?
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Thank God for this messageboard. What is Glutamine and acidophilus. This is the first time I am hearing about these? Loretta

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Irish I am with you.. I have never heard of them either.. Hope someone can helps us with this.. need all the help we can to make our lives better.. B)

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irish and Kathy,

Glutamine is a specific amino acid. I don't know exactly what it is used for in the body, but I believe it can help regulate mood, control cravings, and heal gut damage--all useful things for us celiacs! Acidophilus (Lactobacillus acidophilus) is a friendly bacterium that is best known as the culturing agent in yogurt. It is desirable to have a flourishing colony of acidophilus and related beneficial microbes in the large intestine, because they assist in digestion and crowd out any bacterial bullies that try to cause trouble.

I hope this information is helpful!

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Ok.. that helps alot, but one more question... Where do you get these products, I eat quite a bit of yogurt, but is this something you can take in a vitamin type form? I have had a liver transplant that is contributed alot to my gluten problems and do suffer alot of bloating at times... Is this a product that would help with that I would be so happy.. So I guess where do I get these products .. are they something I am doing wrong on my diet or is this another vitamin or supplement that I can add to the numerous pills I take every day?

Thanks for any further information anyone can supply.. Hugs to all.. Kathy :huh:

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Glutamine is the most abundant amino acid in our bodies. It's good for immunity, recovery from workouts & muscle mass, but especially usefull for assisting the gut in healing itself.

Acidopholous is just one of many "good bacteria" in your colon. Your colon has both good and bad bacteria in it and for people with digestive problems, they often have more bad bacteria then good. Taking acidopholus and boosting the good bacteria in your colon will help overall bowel health. Many yogurts brands you buy at the grocery store do not have enough (or any) active bacteria in them.

Both supplements can be found in the health food store. Acidopholous is usually in the fridge. Often times you will find it mixed with Bifidus (another good bacteria) and FOS, which is basically food for good bacteria and helps the good bacteria multiply.

A quick search on he internet will provide lots of info.

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http://www.healthandage.com/html/res/com/C...dophiluscs.html

Article from above link:

Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) is the most commonly used probiotic, or "friendly" bacteria. Such healthy bacteria inhabit the intestines and vagina and protect against the entrance and proliferation of "bad" organisms that can cause disease. This is accomplished through a variety of mechanisms. For example, the breakdown of food by L. acidophilus leads to production of lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and other byproducts that make the environment hostile for undesired organisms. L. acidophilus also produces lactase, the enzyme that breaks down milk sugar (lactose) into simple sugars. People who are lactose intolerant do not produce this enzyme. For this reason, L. acidophilus supplements may be beneficial for these individuals.

Other potential probiotics include a variety of Lactobacillus species (spp.), such as the caseiGG, rhamnosus, NCFM, DDS-1, and johnsonii strains, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Streptococcus thermophilus, Enterococcus faecium, Saccharaomyces boulardii, Bacillus spp., and Escherichia coli.

Prebiotics refers to the soluble fiber component found in certain foods or supplements that stimulate the growth of probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract.

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Uses

Probiotics offer a variety of potential therapeutic uses. These include the following:

Replacing the "friendly" intestinal bacteria destroyed by antibiotics.

Aiding digestion and suppressing disease-causing bacteria.

Preventing and treating diarrhea, including infectious diarrhea, particularly from rotavirus (a virus that commonly causes diarrhea in children).

Treating overgrowth of "bad" organisms in the gastrointestinal tract (a condition that tends to cause diarrhea and may occur from use of antibiotics).

Alleviating symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome and, possibly, inflammatory bowel disease (such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis).

Preventing and/or reducing the recurrence of vaginal yeast infections, urinary tract infections, and cystitis (bladder inflammation). The best scientific evidence exists for vaginal infections.

Improving lactose absorption digestion in people who are lactose intolerant

Enhancing the immune response. Studies have suggested that consumption of yogurt or milk that contains specific strains of Lactobacillus or supplements with Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium may improve the natural immune response. Further research is needed to confirm these early findings and to best understand how the improved immune function may or may not help in warding off infections.

Aiding the treatment of respiratory infections such as sinusitis, bronchitis, and pneumonia. More research is needed in this area.

Lowering risk of allergies. Examples include asthma, hay fever, food allergies to milk, and skin reactions such as eczema.

Helping to treat high cholesterol. More research is needed.

Reducing the risk of recurring bladder tumors once this cancer has been treated. Much more research is needed in this area.

Other conditions under investigation for use of probiotics include colon cancer, HIV related diarrhea, and Helicobacter pylori, an organism that can lead to development of ulcers.

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Dietary Sources

The primary dietary sources of L. acidophilus include milk enriched with acidophilus, yogurt containing live L. acidophilus cultures, miso, and tempeh.

Prebiotics are found in breast milk, onions, tomatoes, bananas, honey, barley, garlic and wheat.

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Available Forms

L. acidophilus preparations consist of dried or liquid cultures of living bacteria. These cultures are usually grown in milk but can sometimes be grown in milk-free cultures. L. acidophilus is available in the following forms:

Freeze-dried granules

Freeze-dried powders

Freeze-dried capsules

Liquid L. acidophilus preparations (which must be kept refrigerated)

Prebiotics occur naturally in foods, but supplements provide a more concentrated source of this substance. Prebiotics are oligosacchrides, chains of sugar units linked together. Inulin is a long-chain oligosacchride (from 2-60 sugars) and fructooligosaccharides (FOS) are short-chain oligosaccharides (from 2-7 sugars). It is not clear at this time which type of prebiotic is most effective.

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How to Take It

Pediatric

Newborns and Infants (0 to 1 year)

Liquid preparations may be used as a lotion and applied topically to diaper area for yeast infections and diaper rashes.

If the child is on antibiotic therapy,

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Link/info for glutamine (I take 10 grams/day):

http://www.wellfx.com/InfoBase/vitamin_glutamine_.htm

Glutamine is an amino acid, one of the building blocks of protein that are linked together by peptide bonds in specific chemical arrangements to form proteins. It is found in both plant and animal proteins and is available in a variety of supplemental forms.

Glutamine helps the body maintain the correct acid

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;) Thank you Thank you so much for all of the infomation.. You went well above anything I expected.. I will copy this information and take to my doctor since I had the liver transplant, I don't take anything without checking with the transplant team first.. This is all very interesting to me.. I have scleroderma along with the celiac disorder so along with all the meds I take (about 24 per day) my immune system is screwed up alot.. But following the diet we need to follow helps alot.. Maybe some of these additions will help make it alittle easier.. Thanks again for all of the info.. I am so glad that I finally got into this site.. Been using the Gluten Free Mall for a long time, but didn't know about this site..

See you around the site later.. Thanks again.. Kathy :)

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