Celiac.com 04/25/2012 - In my experience growing up with undiagnosed celiac disease, I had to deal with several symptoms that my doctors had no answers for. One of the most frustrating of these was my skin troubles—dermatitis herpetiformis. After my experiences with misdiagnoses, and finally more recently, learning how to effectively get rid of dermatitis herpetiformis, I encourage parents to be particularly watchful for signs of dermatitis herpetiformis in their children, and I have some useful advice for those—children and adults—who have already been diagnosed with this annoying and sometimes quite troublesome rash. Since dermatitis herpetiformis occurs in 15 to 20% of celiacs, it’s worth any celiac’s time to learn more about this condition.

Photo: CC - AnosmiaBy definition, dermatitis herpetiformis is a blistering and extremely itchy skin rash. It’s usually symmetrical in shape and is most commonly located on the elbows, knees, buttocks, and upper back. It’s common for people with dermatitis herpetiformis to have rashes appear in the same spot, and they can either be consistent or come and go. People can experience the rash on other parts of the body, and severity of symptoms can vary. Dermatitis herpetiformis is sometimes called the “gluten rash” or “celiac disease rash” because it occurs in people with a gluten intolerance or celiac disease. It is commonly misdiagnosed as eczema.

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. In people who have celiac disease, gluten causes an autoimmune response which results in the immune system attacking the lining of the small intestine—specifically the