No popular authors found.

Categories

No categories found.


Join Celiac.com's forum / message board and get your questions answered! Our forum has nearly 1 MILLION POSTS, and over 62,000 MEMBERS just waiting to help you with any questions about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet. We'll see you there!






Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

5 Things People With Celiac Disease Need You to Understand

Celiac.com 06/12/2014 - Here are five things people with celiac disease need regular folks to know about celiac disease:

  1. Photo: Wikimedia Commons--enoch lauWe are NOT on a Fad Diet—Celiac disease is not some vague, make-believe condition. Celiac disease is a potentially serious immune disorder that, if left untreated, can lead to a very deadly types of stomach, intestinal, and other cancers. Just because a bunch of people seem to think that gluten is the new high fructose corn syrup, doesn’t mean that I’m one of them. Remember, for people with celiac disease, gluten is no joke, and avoiding gluten is the only way to stay healthy.
  2. We Won’t Be Getting Over It—Currently, there is no cure for celiac disease, and the only treatment is a gluten-free diet. That’s the only way to avoid the gut damage, lower risks for other types of auto-immune conditions, and minimize the risk of various types of cancer associated with celiac disease.
  3. Celiac Disease is a Serious Condition—Since the effects of untreated celiac disease unfold slowly over time, it’s tempting for some people to look at celiac disease as a minor inconvenience. However, it’s important to understand that celiac disease is a potentially serious autoimmune disorder that, if left untreated, can leave people susceptible to other autoimmune conditions, and to deadly types of stomach, intestinal, and other cancers. 
  4. A ‘Little Gluten’ Might Hurt Me—There’s no such thing as ‘a little gluten’ to people with celiac disease. Gut damage happens with as little as 20 parts of gluten per million. That is a microscopic amount. A 'gluten-free' diet means no gluten. Period.
  5. When in Doubt, Ask—If you’re not sure if I can safely eat a certain ingredient, or a certain food, just ask. Figuring out what is or is not gluten-free can be tricky, even for me. So, it's best to ask if you're not positive.

Can you think of others?

 

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).



Related Articles




Spread The Word





31 Responses:

 
Dottie
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
12 Jun 2014 3:38:16 AM PST
I would like to add the DH aspect of celiac--it is rarely mentioned and it is also real and dangerous. I've seen comments to the contrary..." tissues and TP will not hurt you unless unless you eat it"...WRONG!!!

 
Jared M.
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
16 Jun 2014 12:08:12 PM PST
Perhaps you could tell us what the acronyms DH and TP are? I have no idea what you are trying to say.

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
16 Jun 2014 8:14:32 PM PST
DH is dermatitis herpetaformis and TP is toilet paper.

 
Jane
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
12 Jun 2014 11:21:53 AM PST
I am so glad to learn more. By choice I am gluten free due to the wheat today being GMO .

 
Mary
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
16 Jun 2014 7:24:49 AM PST
What is GMO?

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
16 Jun 2014 8:15:44 PM PST
GMO is "Genetically Modified Organism."

 
dee
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
16 Jun 2014 8:36:19 PM PST
But ... wheat isn't genetically modified ... it has been hybridized beyond recognition, but is it not genetically modified like corn and soy and sugar beets.

 
Jefferson
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
19 Jun 2014 11:44:50 AM PST
dee is correct. Wheat is hybridized beyond recognition, but not GMO.

 
Christy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
17 Jun 2014 7:25:24 AM PST
Wheat is not GMO. It has been bred to have more gluten, but it is not genetically modified to be resistant to pesticides. There is quite a difference between natural breeding of plants and spicing in bacterial DNA.

 
Lynn_M
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
17 Jun 2014 7:47:02 PM PST
Commercial wheat is not GMO. GMO wheat has not been approved for sale in the US. There is some GMO wheat being tested experimentally, but it is not legal to sell it. GMO means protein from a foreign organism has been inserted into the genetics of the plant.

However, wheat has been hydridized, and now has something like 42 chromosomes in it as compared to the the smaller number (16?) found in ancient wheat. Today's wheat is dramatically different than ancient wheat, but it is not GMO, yet. Also, glyphosate (Roundup) is sprayed on many plant crops, including wheat, about a week or so before harvest, to kill off the vegetation and make it easier to harvest the crop. This leaves residues of glyphosate on grain and legume crops when they're harvested.

 
robert
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
13 Jun 2014 12:07:51 PM PST
I'm 41 and just diagnosed with celiac disease. My intestinal and overall health has declined over the past 6 months. Blood tests have revealed the allergy and I'm to undergo an upper endoscopy shortly. I thought gluten free was a fad until I realized that the disease has seriously has affected my quality of life.

 
Sandy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
16 Jun 2014 3:31:42 PM PST
To Robert:

Celiac disease is not an allergy, altho there is a condition called "Wheat Allergy". That is definitely classified as an allergy. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease. My advice to you is to join a support group in your area for guidance and support as you learn to live with this disease.

 
Toni
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
16 Jun 2014 7:53:49 PM PST
Robert, I have been where you are and it's hard, but it will get better as you come to better understand the diet and it's limitations. Your health should improve, but that will take some time. Do you need the endoscope if celiac is confirmed? Now a days the scope is no longer the gold standard if symptoms, blood work, etc are at certain levels.

 
jess
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
15 Jun 2014 12:23:46 PM PST
remember it is not an allergy!!!! I finally know why soaps, lotions, makeup and all things that go on skin made my body react not like an allergy but very angrily. the laundry soap and dish soaps even have to be free of wheat barley and rye byproduct.

 
Jo
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
24 Jun 2014 10:35:32 AM PST
This is something I get conflicting info about. I have read that celiac patients need to avoid gluten in soaps, lotions etc., but my doctor insists that the gluten has to be ingested to do damage so I only need to worry about lipsticks and that kind of thing.

 
Linda
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
08 Jul 2014 6:52:02 PM PST
I just was recently diagnosed. I have not been able to wear make up for a long time now, my eye lids crack and bleed. I just recently purchased certified gluten free make up, I had a job interview (I'm not big on make up), and I have worn it 2 different days, all day long and have not had any cracking, bleeding or burning, so, I am thinking there has to be something to not using products on your skin with gluten. I thought it was worth the try to use the gluten free, and it sure did work.

 
CS Prid
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
19 Aug 2014 4:25:10 AM PST
Jo, your doctor is wrong about this. Your skin is your largest organ, and it absorbs what you but on it and it goes into your body's system. Being just as mindful about what goes on the skin as in the body will keep one from having a negative reaction.

 
Kelle
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
16 Jun 2014 9:02:24 AM PST
I would add that having "no symptoms" is not an indicator of "no damage". We tend to think that if one doesn't react in a measurable way, you are ok. However, in the case of Celiac disease 60% of patients are "latent" in that their immune system is reacting but the patient doesn't have recognizable symptoms. Hence, the feeling that this isn't a serious condition . . .

 
Martina
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
17 Jun 2014 1:07:55 PM PST
I agree - this is a very important one to add!

 
Jefferson
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
19 Jun 2014 11:46:15 AM PST
Excellent point!

 
Diane
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
16 Jun 2014 9:22:53 AM PST
Celiac disease is not an allergy. I do not carry an epi-pen. I do not break out in hives or start sneezing. I do not get ill immediately if I accidentally ingest a minute amount of gluten (from cross-contamination). Celiac disease is more insidious than all that.

 
Hilary
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
16 Jun 2014 2:53:24 PM PST
Another outstanding piece of writing, Thanks Jefferson... I shared it on FB... my husband and I make sick "jokes" about me"getting over" being celiac .... but it is true, people do not understand it at all, and having people not gluten intolerant on a GF diet, makes it hard. Thank you so much!

 
Margaret
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
16 Jun 2014 9:28:54 PM PST
Hilary, you are SO right about "people not understanding it" but what's worse, in my opinion is the disservice brought on by "trend setters" that think they will lose weight on a GF "diet"..yes, they think it's just the newest diet craze!, and because of that, people do not take celiac DISEASE seriously. This affects how we are treated in restaurants (as the waiters/waitresses and chefs even,may not take as many precautions), how we are treated with friends and relatives who just can't get it through their head that this is an autoimmune DISEASE!! Not a diet! I like that the word is finally getting out about GF items and the products they sell are much better than they were even 5 years ago, but...the above mentioned gripe I think just sets us back a bit. It's bad enough that people don't understand celiac, or the popular phrase "I've never heard of celiac..what is that?" but to now be lumped in with the "GF is a fad diet" crowd is a step back.

 
Jefferson
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
19 Jun 2014 11:47:56 AM PST
We share similar feelings about the "fad" gluten-free dieters, and how they influence perceptions of celiac disease.

 
Katrina
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
16 Jun 2014 5:18:32 PM PST
Many GF products can still contain gluten make sure it's certified and eat whole real foods to heal. Also if someone has a intolerance to gluten same rules apply!

 
Gayle Wagler
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
17 Jun 2014 7:24:56 AM PST
I am excited! I am excited to have found this web site, that is full of information that will help me understand my disease better and that informs me of the latest products and research in the celiac world. I am very excited about the explosion of over due diagnoses and products available to us. I was diagnosed twenty years ago and only someone in the same boat can understand and appreciate how truly far we have come.

 
Bonnie
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
18 Jun 2014 12:33:28 PM PST
I was 71 when I got diagnosed--went gluten free too late. I already had Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Sjogren's syndrome--both autoimmune diseases which might not be there if I had gone GF years ago. So if you have some gut symptoms and your doc just passes it off as IBS or something else, ask him/her to specifically test you for celiac with a specific serology and maybe even get a biopsy or two.

 
Jefferson
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
19 Jun 2014 11:50:12 AM PST
An excellent point, Bonnie! The sooner people are diagnosed, the healthier they will be. I'm sorry to hear about your other conditions. I wish you well.

 
Jo
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
24 Jun 2014 10:49:45 AM PST
Some doctors will brush off concerns about celiac disease if you don't have dramatic symptoms. I was just diagnosed 4 years ago at the age of 47 and realized that vague symptoms I attributed to menopause or aging -- migraines, digestive problems, what I thought was IBS, bloating and water retention -- were caused by the celiac disease. And it seemed my teenage daughter had similar symptoms. So because of the genetic factor I brought it up to her pediatrician for the last several years and she kept saying "if and when she shows symptoms we can test." Finally this year I told her my daughter is going to college next year and I need to know before she goes if there is a problem, so she did the test. My daughter's antibody count was well over 300 and there was no doubt she had the disease even without the endoscopy. So if it is suspected, in my mind there is no reason not to do a simple blood test and we should all be persistent with doctors who don't want to do it.

 
Catherine
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
18 Jun 2014 2:59:53 PM PST
Thank you for the article. I have no symptoms so it is hard even for me to explain why I don't eat gluten other than I think I might get stomach cancer or worse one day. I am one of the lucky ones who found out because of genetics. Otherwise, I would merrily eat loaf after loaf of bread. It's not such a hard diet if one simply eats well and avoids processed food altogether.

 
john j acres
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
18 Jun 2014 3:14:02 PM PST
Now we are getting somewhere. I recently answered a survey and one part I answered to a question, gluten free products carry a lot of additives and derivatives and that is why you will never see these words on the gluten free packets "suitable for coeliacs."




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *: