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Nut Free, Gluten- Free Flour
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Hi,

I am new to this site and tried to find this topic in one of the other threads and couldn't seem to. Hope this is not repetitive.

I am looking for a good all purpose gluten free flour that is also nut free. I have been wheat free since 2008, after a diagnosis of a wheat allergy. However, with the continuation of many symptoms I have recently (6 months ago) eliminated all gluten. I was diagnosed with a tree nut allergy a few weeks ago. I have not been doing any baking, and am now looking to do some Christmas baking. I know that people often use a variety of flours mixed, but I am not sure what the ratio for that mix would be. I had used the Bob's Red Mill all purpose flour previously, but see that it is possibly CC. Any suggestions? I am in Halifax, Nova Scotia and so am somewhat limited in my retail options.

Thanks

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Hi HaliGirl,

I have celiac and my daughter is allergic to tree nuts and peanuts. I use Kinnikinnick flour for baking. This is a Canadian company and their facility is tree nut and peanut free. Their website is www.kinnikinnick.com. They sell brown rice, white rice flours, tapioca starch, potato starch, xanthum gum etc. etc. Everything you need to begin your baking adventure. The products are readily available in my local health food store.

I use the basic flour mix as follows:

2 parts rice flour (white or brown)

2/3 parts potato starch

1/3 part tapioca flour.

Hope this helps.

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Hi again,

I forgot to mention that Kinnikinnick does mail order and I also remembered another company called Duinkerken who are based in PEI. They are also peanut/tree nut free facility. I found this flour in my local Sobeys (I live in Calgary, Alberta), and they also do mail order.

Hope this helps.

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Oh, what a bummer about the tree nut allergy. :(

You can successfully bake with almost any sort of gluten free flour mixture, if you tweak the recipe enough.

3 way mixtures, one third of each, work well, such as:

rice flour /corn starch/ tapioca

rice/ potato starch / tapioca

rice / corn starch / potato

rice / corn or potato starch / arrowroot starch instead of tapioca

These are for things such as you would be using white regular flour for, such as cakes, cookies, and typically are available at regular groceries.

The simplest thing to do is to just take the equal weight of each, and mix them together in a big zip lock bag, to store in the refrigerator.

You would then add 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of zanthan gum per cup of gluten-free flour mixture used in the recipe.

If you get more adventurous, you can try adding other types of gluten free flour substitutes, such as sorghum, buckwheat, teff, quinoa, amaranth, millet, to your recipes, say anywhere from a 1/3 to a 1/4 of the total amount used. I will take two of these heartier grain types and mix them together, to store them, to save time when adding them to a recipe.

In a pinch, even a 2 - way mixture of corn starch flour and rice flour works, or tapioca and potato.... Any allergy can be adapted to.

If you have trouble shopping locally, there is always mail order. :)

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You can order this flour online.

JULES GLUTEN-FREE FLOUR INGREDIENTS:

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Thanks for the information everyone.

I have eaten Kinnikinnick breads and other products before, but I was not sure how the flours should be combined. I think I can find most of the flours at local stores.

Has anyone tried Namaste all purpose flour? It is available here and it is tree nut free.

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