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  • Jefferson Adams

    What's the Best Way to Treat Immune-mediated Cerebellar Ataxias?

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Can researchers improve treatment for immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias? Photo: CC--Marco Bellucci
    Caption: Can researchers improve treatment for immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias? Photo: CC--Marco Bellucci

    Celiac.com 12/28/2015 - Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include gluten ataxia, paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, GAD antibody associated cerebellar ataxia, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    Photo: CC--Marco BellucciDespite the identification of an increasing number of immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias, there is no proposed standardized therapy.



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    Recently, a research team set out to develop guidelines for treatment of immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias.

    The research team included H. Mitoma, M. Hadjivassiliou, and J. Honnorat. They are variously associated with the Department of Medical Education at Tokyo Medical University in Tokyo, Japan; the Academic Department of Neurosciences at Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK; the University Lyon 1; INSERM, UMR-S1028, CNRS, UMR-5292, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Neuro-Oncology and Neuro-Inflammation Team, 7; and the National Reference Centre for Paraneoplastic Neurological Diseases, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital neurologique in Bron, France.

    For their study, the team evaluated the efficacies of immunotherapies in reported cases using a common scale of daily activity.

    Their resulting analysis focuses on the importance of removing autoimmune triggers (e.g., gluten or cancer), evaluating immunotherapy (e.g., corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, immunosuppressants), and adjusting according to each sub-type.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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