No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Gluten-Detecting Dogs


Celiac.com 02/07/2011 - Maintaining a diet completely free of gluten can be a challenge for celiac disease patients, especially when it comes to avoiding cross-contamination. Currently there is only one treatment for celiac disease, an autoimmune reaction caused by exposure to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye—and this treatment is the elimination of gluten from the diet. Despite our best efforts, gluten can sneak its way into our food, making us quite ill. While home testing kits are available to test food for gluten, these can be an inconvenience when dining out and can only detect 10 ppm of gluten or more. A recent article published by USA Today has made waves in the gluten-free world, making us aware of another method of testing for gluten—using gluten-detecting dogs.

The article featured Hollie Scott and her dog, two-year-old Elias, a Beaceron who is also an AKG Grand Champion. Hollie Scott is a celiac whose reaction to gluten is particularly serious; even just the tiniest amount of the substance in her food can give her the symptoms of a severe stomach flu for several weeks. Scott attends the University of Missouri, where her dog attends classes and social functions with her and keeps her company at restaurants and on buses, trains, and airplanes.

Ads by Google:

Elias was trained in Slovenia over the course of many weeks for his gluten detection training. Now he has the capability of detecting gluten in all sorts of hot and cold foods.  According to USA Today, “Teaching a dog to be alert to the scent of gluten is much more complicated than most scent-detection training, because gluten comes in so many forms.” Gluten can appear in bread and cereal products and can be processed in many different ways. It can also appear in less obvious products as binders or thickeners, in foods such as salad dressing and even in products such as Play-doh and lipstick.

How does Elias do his job? Scott places a cover punctured with holes over the item while Elias sniffs it. Scott also practices with him on a daily basis, giving him gluten-containing items to test for her. When Elias detects gluten, he pulls the item away, and if there’s nothing to worry about, he looks away. Getting a gluten-detection dog may not be an option for many of us celiacs, but vigilantly reading labels, contacting companies, and clearly communicating with servers, chefs, and hosts can greatly reduce the risk of cross-contamination. Another option is a testing kit such as EZ Gluten® by ELISA Technologies, which is sensitive enough to detect 10 ppm in your food. Unfortunately, as USA Today says, “even hyper-vigilance isn't a 100% guarantee.” If you are particularly sensitive to gluten, as is Scott, getting a gluten-detection dog may be a smart idea. Perhaps in the future, gluten-detection dogs may be more widely used.

With an increase in research and awareness, we have not only witnessed an increase in celiac disease diagnosis, but also several advancements, for instance the availability of products such as home gluten testing kits, home celiac testing kits, and gluten-digesting enzyme formulas, which have all contributed toward making gluten-free living less of a challenge. Gluten-detecting dog training is yet another advancement, which I hope will have a positive impact on the lives of severe celiac cases such as Hollie Scott.  

Resources:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



2 Responses:

 
kathy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
18 Feb 2014 9:11:09 AM PDT
There is also a German Shorthair that is trained on finding gluten in foods, make up, and trace amounts. Look her up at noseydogdetectionpartners.com

 
Shaun
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
22 Mar 2017 1:05:55 PM PDT
No pictures? !!




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

BOBS RED mill makes an all purpose flour with no rice try Quinoa flour buckwheat flour tapioca chic pea flour coconut flour almond meal ground into a flour flax meal all these things make great " toast" and healthy alternatives to too much rice flour yummy

Oh yeah. I'm 6 months in and still have bad days, even though I know I'm not eating gluten. It takes a long time to heal. I have been on here a lot in the past 6 months venting because I didn't feel good. I just posted today about how tired I still am. Everyone has basically said the same thing - give it time. Be patient. It can take a long time. Some people said it can take a year. Hang in there.

Ok, so I have another question for all of you professional Celiacs. I read an article recently that talked about a study that was done on people with Celiac's disease, which said that some of them (a small number) had high levels of arsenic in their systems because of all of the rice products that they eat. Now, I don't eat a ton of rice, but we do have gluten-free pasta a couple times a week, my son and I like rice Chex, and I know there's brown rice flour in the pizza crusts I use and in the gluten-free bread that I eat. How worried about arsenic poisoning do we need to be? I'm not downing rice at every meal but I do eat it daily, I'm sure. I rarely eat rice, rice. Usually it's the rice flour that's in things. Is this one more thing to keep me up at night? Because now I'm like, "Oh this is great. I'm trading gluten for arsenic." I need to eat carbs. If I just eat fruits and veggies and meat I'll lose weight which stresses me out. I want to be able to eat toast with peanut butter and eggs but I worry my toast is killing me. Am I being a little dramatic.

So I've been gluten free for 6 months. I gave it up the day of my endoscopy and never looked back. I was a fairly silent Celiac. My blood work was always normal (never anemic, malnourished), I didn't have all the horrible symptoms that others do. I think I caught it early and that those things were definitely coming. Since going gluten-free I notice that my belly is better. I still have days where it's not great, but in the last month I've noticed that it's consistently pretty good. I don't hardly ever get stomach aches. I've lost 16 lbs and I'm never bloated. Those things are good. But, aside from that, I don't feel much different than I did before. I'm still tired a lot. But I have two kids under 4 and I run a non-profit. I have horrible anxiety and that's only increased since finding out about my Celiac (it's health anxiety and it freaked me out big time that I have an AI disorder). I feel like my complexion looks the same (never had an issue with that). I just read stories on here that talk about how the brain fog lifted quickly, or how people don't feel tired anymore, etc. I'm still a zombie sometimes. Has anyone else has this experience? Maybe my body was doing such a good job compensating for my Celiac that I wasn't really very symptomatic to begin with - and that the tiredness I feel isn't due to gluten. Oh, FYI, I had a full thyroid panel done in December and it was all normal.

Your daughter could have non celiac gluten sensitivity. That would correspond to negative celiac tests coupled with positive reaction to the gluten free diet. Whilst there are similarities to celiac presentation it appears that neuro symptoms are more common in ncgs patients. That seems to be the case for me anyway! The condition is as yet poorly understood but there is progress being made, check out a topic I just started on the pre diagnosis thread with some info and links. The remarks by umberto Volta in particular are just about the best summation I've yet seen on where the research is at. I will post a link later.