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Conjugated Linoleic Acid Protects Against Gliadin-induced Depletion of Intestinal Defenses

Celiac.com 10/26/2011 - In vitro and in clinical studies have shown that oxidative stress plays a role in gluten-induced toxicity,  but no studies have observed this activity in living tissue.

A research team set out to examine the role of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor2 in gliadin-mediated toxicity in human Caco-2 intestinal cells and in gliadin-sensitive human leukocyte antigen-DQ8 transgenic mice (DQ8), along with assessing the protective activity of CLA.

The research team included Paolo Bergamo, Marta Gogliettino, Gianna Palmieri, Ennio Cocca, Francesco Maurano, Rosita Stefanile, Marco Balestrieri, Giuseppe Mazzarella, Chella David, and Mauro Rossi.

The team had previously observed the protective role played by conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), which works by the activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor2 (Nrf2), which serves as a crucial transcription factor for the synthesis of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes (phase 2).

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To assess gliadin effects in differentiated Caco-2 cells and in DQ8 mice, they fed the mice a gliadin-containing diet with or without CLA supplementation, and then combined enzymatic, immunochemical, immunohistochemical, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) data.

In both laboratory tests, and in living tissue tests, they found gliadin toxicity accompanied by downregulation of phase 2 and elevated proteasome-acylpeptide hydrolase activity.

Interestingly, in DQ8 mice intestine, gliadin did not generate severe oxidative stress extent or pathological reactions like those found in celiac patients. Moreover, the reactions that did result were mitigated by CLA.

From these results, the researchers conclude that CLA offers beneficial effects against the reduction of key intestinal cytoprotective defenses. This indicates a new nutritional approach for the treatment of intestinal disease associated with altered redox homeostasis.

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2 Responses:

 
ted
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said this on
31 Oct 2011 8:50:03 PM PDT
Too technical.

 
JOANMARIE JOHNSON
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said this on
31 Oct 2011 9:14:24 PM PDT
A little long on medical jargon but with a dictionary or a medical knowledge understandable. I have lived with a mostly controlled celiac sprue condition for 6 years. Still learning. It is good to know that I am not alone. My spouse of course has absolutely no food issues except quantity. He can't keep his weight up.




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Thank you for your reply, though it's not necessarily what I wanted to hear, it is what I was thinking.

you're lucky you dont catch colds. im the opposite i catch everything very easily and get alot sicker than whoever i caught it from and take much longer to get better.

Even one positive can be diagnostic. This is one: Gliadin deamidated peptide IgG 33.9. If unsure, a biopsy of the small intestine will provide definite confirmation. There is a control test to validate the other ones, but I don't see it there. What is does is validate the others by checking on the overall antibody levels. But it is to detect possible false negatives. A positive is a positive. I think your daughter has joined our club.

My daughter, almost 7 years old, recently had a lot of blood work done, her Dr is out of the office, but another Dr in the practice said everything looked normal. I'm waiting for her Dr to come back and see what she thinks. I'm concerned because there is one abnormal result and I can't find info to tell me if just that one test being abnormal means anything. The reason for the blood work is mainly because of her poor growth, though she does have some other symptoms. IgA 133 mg/dl Reference range 33-200 CRP <2.9 same as reference range Gliadin Deamidated Peptide IgA .4 Reference range <=14.9 Gliadin deamidated peptide IgG 33.9 Reference range <=14.9 TTG IgA .5 Reference range <=14.9 TTG IgG <.8 Reference range <=14.9

Just watch out. I just went to the expo in Schaumburg, IL, and ended up getting glutened. I realized afterward that I ate all these samples thinking they were gluten free, and they weren't. One company was advertising some sugar, and had made some cake, but then I realized.... How do I know if this contains any other ingredients that might have gluten? Did they make it with a blender or utensils that had gluten contamination? Makes me realize the only safe things would be packaged giveaways with gluten free labeling. My fault for not thinking things through. It was just too exciting thinking i could try it all and enjoy without worry.