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becky_01

Kraft Products ... I'm Shocked!

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This forum is here to help newbies. "According to my opinion" we DO need to discuss things, and when those of us with years of experience can ease the minds of newbies about the safety of certain products, we have done our job well.

 

When other newbies come here and try to scare people away from perfectly safe products, they are being counterproductive.

 

The bottom line is, no matter what YOU think, Kraft is a great company that is extremely celiac friendly for those who are willing to read labels, and their products are available at reasonable prices.

 

And I must say, I notice you were "diagnosed" by Enterolab. If you had applied the same stringent demands of your "diagnostician" as you do to food companies, you would have learned that Enterolab is a scam. I'm not saying you don't have celiac, but the "test" you had is not recognized by the medical community nor celiac specialists. There are tests available in which the science is solid and has been peer reviewed. I suggest you do better research in the future because when it comes to one's health, shaky science can be dangerous.

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Ok--case in point--I looked up the ingredients for Kraft Shredded cheese:

 

KRAFT NATURAL CHEESE - SHREDDED CHEESE W/TOUCH OF PHILADELPHIA - TRIPLE CHEDDAR W/TOUCH OF PHILADELPHIA
02932CF.GIF
Ingredients: VERMONT WHITE CHEDDAR CHEESE (PASTEURIZED MILK, CHEESE CULTURE, SALT, ENZYMES), SHARP CHEDDAR CHEESE (PASTEURIZED MILK, CHEESE CULTURE, SALT, ENZYMES, ANNATTO ), MILD CHEDDAR CHEESE (PASTEURIZED MILK, CHEESE CULTURE, SALT, ENZYMES, ANNATTO ), CREAM CHEESE POWDER (MILKFAT, NONFAT MILK, MILK, SODIUM PHOSPHATE, SALT, CAROB BEAN GUM, CHEESE CULTURE); CELLULOSE POWDER ADDED TO PREVENT CAKING; NATAMYCIN (A NATURAL MOLD INHIBITOR). CONTAINS: MILK.
Size: 8 OZ
Upc: 2100002932
 
 

Then I went to the "safe" food list. Natamycine is not on that list, nor is it on the bad list....so, is it, or is it not gluten-free??  I don't know.  Kraft won't say one way or another.  It's not on the list associated with this site.  You say its ok--how do I know you are right?  See the problem we have with this?   According to the new FDA labeling laws, if they use the gluten-free labels it has to be under 20 PPM.  The gluten-free label is optional, like Kraft is doing, but if it is used, the product has to be gluten-free.

 

From the Dandy Blend site: since that post is referenced here....they do test....

 

This is the most frequently asked of all questions about Dandy Blend.

 
 
Dandy Blend is made of the water-soluble extracts of five ingredients; three roots and two grains (barley and rye), not from the ingredients themselves. The ingredients are roasted separately and then combined in prescribed proportions, placed into a vat, covered with hot water, and allowed to steep for a prescribed period of time. The water, with the soluble portions of all the components, is separated from the grounds and spray dried. The remaining fine brown powder left after the water is driven off is what becomes Dandy Blend. All the gluten and other water-insoluble substances are left behind in the grounds to be composted.

 
 
Hence, there is no gluten in Dandy Blend. Goosefoot Acres periodically submits samples of Dandy Blend to Elisa Technologies Laboratory in Florida, one of the most respected gluten testing labs in the United States for analysis, and so far, every test has come back gluten-free. Click to see test results letter.

 
 
Therefore, from the standpoint of containing gluten, Dandy Blend is safe for celiac sufferers and other gluten-intolerant individuals.

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Ok--case in point--I looked up the ingredients for Kraft Shredded cheese:

 

KRAFT NATURAL CHEESE - SHREDDED CHEESE W/TOUCH OF PHILADELPHIA - TRIPLE CHEDDAR W/TOUCH OF PHILADELPHIA
02932CF.GIF
Ingredients: VERMONT WHITE CHEDDAR CHEESE (PASTEURIZED MILK, CHEESE CULTURE, SALT, ENZYMES), SHARP CHEDDAR CHEESE (PASTEURIZED MILK, CHEESE CULTURE, SALT, ENZYMES, ANNATTO ), MILD CHEDDAR CHEESE (PASTEURIZED MILK, CHEESE CULTURE, SALT, ENZYMES, ANNATTO ), CREAM CHEESE POWDER (MILKFAT, NONFAT MILK, MILK, SODIUM PHOSPHATE, SALT, CAROB BEAN GUM, CHEESE CULTURE); CELLULOSE POWDER ADDED TO PREVENT CAKING; NATAMYCIN (A NATURAL MOLD INHIBITOR). CONTAINS: MILK.

Size: 8 OZ

Upc: 2100002932

 
 

Then I went to the "safe" food list. Natamycine is not on that list, nor is it on the bad list....so, is it, or is it not gluten-free??  I don't know.  Kraft won't say one way or another.  It's not on the list associated with this site.  You say its ok--how do I know you are right?  See the problem we have with this?   According to the new FDA labeling laws, if they use the gluten-free labels it has to be under 20 PPM.  The gluten-free label is optional, like Kraft is doing, but if it is used, the product has to be gluten-free.

 

From the Dandy Blend site: since that post is referenced here....they do test....

 

This is the most frequently asked of all questions about Dandy Blend.

 

 

Dandy Blend is made of the water-soluble extracts of five ingredients; three roots and two grains (barley and rye), not from the ingredients themselves. The ingredients are roasted separately and then combined in prescribed proportions, placed into a vat, covered with hot water, and allowed to steep for a prescribed period of time. The water, with the soluble portions of all the components, is separated from the grounds and spray dried. The remaining fine brown powder left after the water is driven off is what becomes Dandy Blend. All the gluten and other water-insoluble substances are left behind in the grounds to be composted.

 

 

Hence, there is no gluten in Dandy Blend. Goosefoot Acres periodically submits samples of Dandy Blend to Elisa Technologies Laboratory in Florida, one of the most respected gluten testing labs in the United States for analysis, and so far, every test has come back gluten-free. Click to see test results letter.

 

 

Therefore, from the standpoint of containing gluten, Dandy Blend is safe for celiac sufferers and other gluten-intolerant individuals.

 

 

 

Might want to check the response on the "Dandy" thread.

 

Natamycin - Sounds like it would be gluten-free.   A bit of a yucky thought, but gluten-free.  

http://www.natamycin.com/natamycin

 

 

It is hard to make a list of every possible food that is gluten-free, IMO.

Edited by kareng

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I don't want to pay anymore for Kraft products than I do now. I am more than happy to read labels every time I buy something. Why should I, as a celiac which is less than 1% of the population, expect a company to change their testing practices just for me which is then going to raise the product's costs for the whole population. Gluten eaters see "gluten free" as a fad and think most of it is bulls$#& even with a diagnosis, how are they going to react when the price of their food goes up because we need the gluten-free on the label. I am guessing not well. Just my opinion.

I sometimes think people get paranoid about where gluten is hiding and worry way too much. That might make me sound like I don't care, but I go to the store, read EVERY label even if I buy the product all the time. I even read the label of the foods I get out of the gluten free section. If I see something with an ingredient I am not sure about or a product I have never bought but am interested in, I write it down and do my research. Then I buy the product. I don't search and search looking for gluten where it's not and the only thing to gluten me in the last few months is a remodeling project on my house. Never thought to look for gluten in my walls and ceiling.

Edited by beth01

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I don't want to pay anymore for Kraft products than I do now. I am more than happy to read labels every time I buy something. Why should I, as a celiac which is less than 1% of the population, expect a company to change their testing practices just for me which is then going to raise the product's costs for the whole population. Gluten eaters see "gluten free" as a fad and think most of it is bulls$#& even with a diagnosis, how are they going to react when the price of their food goes up because we need the gluten-free on the label. I am guessing not well. Just my opinion.

I sometimes think people get paranoid about where gluten is hiding and worry way too much. That might make me sound like I don't care, but I go to the store, read EVERY label even if I buy the product all the time. I even read the label of the foods I get out of the gluten free section. If I see something with an ingredient I am not sure about or a product I have never bought but am interested in, I write it down and do my research. Then I buy the product. I don't search and search looking for gluten where it's not and the only thing to gluten me in the last few months is a remodeling project on my house. Never thought to look for gluten in my walls and ceiling.

 

I do read every label--but when something comes up and I don't know what it is, I put it back on the shelf...paranoid, maybe, but like this example, what is it???  So, us newbies coming here, asking for help, getting blasted because we choose a product that says gluten-free vs one that does not because we are new...that's not ok????  Then, if you do research, 5 sites say gluten-free, 5 say it's not--so who is right???  Point being, if Kraft (or any company) knows a product is gluten-free, label it as such...

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I do read every label--but when something comes up and I don't know what it is, I put it back on the shelf...paranoid, maybe, but like this example, what is it???  So, us newbies coming here, asking for help, getting blasted because we choose a product that says gluten-free vs one that does not because we are new...that's not ok????  Then, if you do research, 5 sites say gluten-free, 5 say it's not--so who is right???  Point being, if Kraft (or any company) knows a product is gluten-free, label it as such...

No one is 'blasting' you because you want to choose a product labeled gluten free over one that doesn't. I was just as paranoid as you about it when I was first diagnosed because I was so severely ill pre-diagnosis and even a trace amount of gluten has me in pain, unable to think for about 3 weeks and also gives me a nasty GI bleed that can last up to 3 days. I shop at Wegmans because they label all their gluten free items and for a while would only go with their brand. However in the 12 years now that I have had to be very strictly gluten free I have learned about companies like Kraft and Unilever. Both will clearly disclose any gluten ingredients on the label. People have tried to explain that they will not hide gluten with chemical names. If something is derived from a gluten ingredient they will say so on the label. They will not say that the gluten has been 'processed out' like the coffee and beer that were mentioned. (By the way I would not touch either for all the money in the world). The best place to go for info on whether something is gluten free or not is the maker. If you really don't want processed food that does not carry the gluten-free label that is your choice. It is best early on to not consume any processed food anyway. 

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SMRI, what you need to remember is that if it has wheat, the law is that it has to say so. So for an ingredient you never heard of, if it is made with or from wheat it'll say something like, "ambirentinutios D (from wheat)" (Pretty cool name I made up, Huh? :lol: )

 

Now rye is something I don't think any of us has ever seen outside of bread or crackers so that one is no worry.

 

Barley is the only one you have to worry about. Mostly you will find it in the ingredient malt. And the thing is, barley is expensive compared to things like corn so if a product DOES contain barley, a company will most likely let you know. It's kind of like they are bragging about what costly ingredients they use.

 

So wheat will always be labeled, rye is a non-issue. If you want to learn about ingredients that may contain barley you could look it up and make a list. Then if you see an ingredient that is on that list, you could either not buy it, or contact the company.

 

I myself am intolerant to corn and they don't have to label for corn. For a while I kept a list of all the things that potentially are made with corn, and I limited my diet so much! After a while I started contacting companies to find out for sure. (For example, xanthan gum is USUALLY grown on corn, but not always. And that shredded cheese we were talking about in the other thread? SOME shredded cheeses have corn starch. Most though are celulose starch.)

 

Anyway, it really isn't as hard as you're making it. I understand the paranoia. I've got that! :lol: But you're limiting yourself in ways you don't have to. Honestly, we've all been through it and we came here for help from the old timers. Some of us have stuck around to pass it forward. There is not a one of us old timers who would give you false information. If we're not sure of a product we'll say so. But if I or Karen or Irish, or any of the members who have been here for a long time tell you something is safe it is because we have done the research. We would NEVER calim something is safe if we were't sure. We don't want YOU to get sick any more than we would want ourselves to. Honestly.

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The cheese I was talking about had wheat on the label--yes, that is easy--again, still new and if one cheese says gluten-free and one doesn't, I'll buy the gluten-free. If Kraft knows something is gluten-free, they could put it on the label just as easily as another company, yet they choose not to...THAT is the point I am trying to make.  I skipped the Jell-O pudding by Kraft for another brand that was labeled gluten-free, same with the Co-Jack and Vermont Cheddar cheese I just bought. 

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If that makes you more comfortable, by all means, stick to foods that say gluten-free. BUT, as has been stated here before, the new law does NOT require that foods be tested before claiming to be gluten-free. That means you HAVE to read the INGREDIENTS LABELS on everything you buy, even if there is a big gluten-free on the front of the package. Here are a few examples of foods that say gluten-free, but have made many people with celiac sick:

 

 
 
 
So read each label every time you buy something, PLEASE, because relying on a company's gluten-free claim could well get you into trouble.

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I was buzzing the internet today looking to see if the Green Giant frozen veggies are gluten free, when I stumbled upon the Gluten Free statement from Kraft.  I'm SHOCKED and had to share this with everyone.  To me, it says ... check the label on their products but beware that even though they do not add gluten to a product, thus not declared on the label, that some of the ingredients in that product MAY contain gluten because they do not verify from their ingredient vendors of the gluten free status, and thus cannot guarantee the end product!!!!  Well, no WONDER I still feel like I've been glutened sometimes!  Thought it was just all in my head!!!  No more Kraft products purchase for me!!!!!!!  :o

 

So, here's the sneaky statement they have on their web site:

 

----------------------------------------

 

For labeling purposes, Kraft includes wheat, barley, rye and oats as sources of gluten. Our packages identify gluten by listing these common sources. Other grains that contain gluten are triticale, spelt, kamut, mir and farina, and if these grains are included in our products, they will also be labeled.  However you should know that we do not guarantee that our products are gluten-free because we sometimes purchase flavoring, color or spice ingredients from suppliers who do not list every possible source of gluten beyond what is required by law.

 

If you have a concern about possible trace amounts of gluten from sources other than wheat, which may be contained in flavoring, color or spice, you should avoid purchasing the product.  A small number of Kraft Foods products are labeled as "gluten-free" according to the proposed definition by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). These are: Crystal Light, Kool-Aid and Tang powdered soft drinks. We take this claim seriously and for such products, we are assured there is no unintentional contact with gluten during every step of the agricultural growing, transportation and manufacturing process. You might notice that many additional Kraft Foods products may have ingredient statements that do not list a source of gluten, but without the extremely specialized procedures in place to diligently validate gluten purity, we do not label the finished product as gluten-free. In this way, we are very serious and thorough when labeling products as gluten-free.

I have gotten sick from eating some of Kraft's products too.  The most recent being sugar free jello.  I know everyone says it's gluten free and it doesn't make them sick but it does make some of us sick.  

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Mynxr, I see that you have been gluten-free for less than a year because you were taking medication on a daily basis that contained gluten. I'm sure that's why things like vinegar bother you, even though most vinegar has no gluten at all. You are still healing. A lot of us have had trouble with non-gluten things until we heal, and that healing can take years. I lost all corn products at first. After a year or so I got corn starch back. And now, over three years in, I have gotten corn oil back.

 

I still can't eat blueberries, not even organic ones. But I know that someday I will get them back too.

 

Lots of us eat jello, sugar free or regular. No problems. There is some ingredient in jello that has set you off just as unexplicably as blueberries set me off. Give it time. Over the long haul I hope to get to the point where gluten is the ONLY thing that makes me sick. And I bet it will happen for you too eventually.

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So read each label every time you buy something, PLEASE, because relying on a company's gluten-free claim could well get you into trouble.

 

 

 

Yes. 

 

There are some chips at Aldi's labelled "naturally gluten free food." My friends bought them and offered them to me, but I passed. The reason? They had oat fiber in them and I'm pretty sure that an Aldi's brand wouldn't have certified gluten free oats.

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If that makes you more comfortable, by all means, stick to foods that say gluten-free. BUT, as has been stated here before, the new law does NOT require that foods be tested before claiming to be gluten-free. That means you HAVE to read the INGREDIENTS LABELS on everything you buy, even if there is a big gluten-free on the front of the package. Here are a few examples of foods that say gluten-free, but have made many people with celiac sick:

 

 
 
 
So read each label every time you buy something, PLEASE, because relying on a company's gluten-free claim could well get you into trouble.

 

 

 

I DO read labels.  I've said that many, many times.  Just because some people got sick from those items, doesn't mean they got sick from gluten.  The Amy's pizza blog, from 3 years ago...Amy's tests their products  "Amy’s has always had strict Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) to avoid cross-contact of our non-gluten products with gluten and we continue to strengthen these practices. The GMPs include strict raw material control, sanitation practices and employee training. We are constantly improving our practices to include more separation, a higher degree of testing and more in process checks. In the last year, we have increased our screening of critical ingredients to verify they are “gluten free” when they arrive at our plant. We continue to make efforts to minimize gluten in areas where gluten free items are processed. We have instituted a screening program to verify that equipment has been thoroughly cleaned between manufacturing runs. In addition, we have an in-house lab so that we are able to quickly screen ingredients and finished products to verify they meet the FDA “gluten free” standard of less than 20 ppm gluten. We are now routinely testing all Amy’s products that are labeled “Gluten Free” to verify they meet the FDA requirement. - See more at: http://www.amys.com/health/special-diets/celiac#sthash.lTlMD3qZ.dpuf"

 

And one more time--new labeling laws require products with the gluten-free label to be less than 20 PPM....  and again--there are things on labels that contain gluten that do not say "wheat" or whatever on them.  Then there is this list :

 

 

The following items may or may not contain gluten depending on where and how they are made, and it is sometimes necessary to check with the manufacturer to find out:

Amp-Isostearoyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein4

Artificial Color4

Baking Powder4

Clarifying Agents4

Coloring4

Dry Roasted Nuts4

Emulsifiers4

Enzymes4

Fat Replacer4

Gravy Cubes4 

Ground Spices4 

Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten4

Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein4

Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Pg-Propyl Silanetriol4

Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch4

Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysate4

Hydroxypropylated Starch4

Miso4 

Natural Juices4

Non-dairy Creamer4

Pregelatinized Starch4

Protein Hydrolysates4

Seafood Analogs4

Seasonings4

Sirimi4

Soba Noodles4 

Soy Sauce4

Soy Sauce Solids4

Sphingolipids4

Stabilizers4

Starch1, 4

Stock Cubes4 

Suet4

Tocopherols4

Vegetable Broth4

Vegetable Gum4

Vegetable Protein4

Vegetable Starch4

Vitamins4 

Wheat Starch5

 

so, this is often where the uncertainty arises....

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SMRI, several of the items you listed have the word "wheat" in them, so there is no "uncertainty" in those cases. In the US, there are two distinct rules that are relevant. There is the new FDA regulation about "gluten-free," but there is the much older federal Food Allergen Labeling And Consumer Protection Act of 2004 (FALCPA) which requires wheat to be disclosed in every case. If any ingredient is derived from wheat, the word "wheat" must appear on the label.

Read more about FALCPA here on the FDA's web site.

In Canada, the rules are more inclusive, and all gluten sources, including oats, are on the top allergen list and must be clearly disclosed.

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SMRI, several of the items you listed have the word "wheat" in them, so there is no "uncertainty" in those cases. In the US, there are two distinct rules that are relevant. There is the new FDA regulation about "gluten-free," but there is the much older federal Food Allergen Labeling And Consumer Protection Act of 2004 (FALCPA) which requires wheat to be disclosed in every case. If any ingredient is derived from wheat, the word "wheat" must appear on the label.

Read more about FALCPA here on the FDA's web site.

In Canada, the rules are more inclusive, and all gluten sources, including oats, are on the top allergen list and must be clearly disclosed.

 

Well, I figured that out on my own that the ones that said wheat had wheat---but what about the wheat proteins and such on the list as "may or may not contain gluten"....why are they on that list and not the unsafe list? Then, as I asked before because it is STILL unclear--some of the natural and artificial flavorings show up on this list----and I was directed to some blog that did NOT answer my question after a hour of looking at information there.  I think what is happening is that those of you that have been doing this for so long buy the same things over and over and also live in other parts of the country so your brands are not available everywhere.  So, when those of us that are new come here and you talk about how easy it is, you forget what it was like to start.  Then you get conflicting information from this site and other sites and you are expected to just trust someone who has a blog.  Heck, I can start a blog today, put all kinds of crap on it and hey, it's on the internet so it must be true.  Then you toss out information about someone that had a reaction to a product that was gluten-free, must be lack of testing--even though they do test.  Now someone just came here and said they had a reaction to a Kraft product, but that can't be because Kraft is so good.....we can go round and round about this but if you look at what you are saying from an outsider's perspective, you contradict yourselves all the time....

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I think what it comes down to is that if you have any doubts that it is gluten-free, after reading all the ingredients, then don't buy it or eat it.... That's where the "easy" comes into it.  We don't have to eat something if in doubt, and there have been many many times that I have gone hungry or eaten a couple of Lara Bars because I could not be sure my food was safe.  

 

Now I live in Canada so instances of confusion have become more infrequent because if a product has wheat or gluten (or eggs, or mustard, or nuts, etc) it mus be listed on the ingredients - it's our law.  That being said, I was on vacation out of my province and passing bakeries or farmer's markets that sold some gluten-free products. I skipped them because I don't trust other people to prepare food for me safely when most do not understand cc.  They might have made it without gluten containing ingredients but it may have picked up gluten from cooking implements or from a contaminated surface or sugar bag.  Is it Boston Pizza that sells a so-called gluten-free pizza, which is made right next to the normal pizzas, by a bunch of teens who probably don't care much?  Educated celiacs won't eat that either.

 

If you are not sure that a product is safe you can check here but it is best to check with the manufacturers. If you are satisfied with their food safety then you can buy it; if not, skip it.  It's just food.  You may be inconvenienced but we have to be responsible for our own health.

 

GlutenDude's blog is pretty good about sniffing out foods that could hurt us.  I think that is why the blog link was posted.  Amy's pizza claims to be gluten-free but it may not be since the facility it is made at is not. It is not certified gluten-free, they just say gluten-free on the label... That's why we have to read every label.

 

In the foods listed above, a few items obviously have gluten due to wheat content. Some are known to usually have gluten because we have read those labels and know the ingredients - for instance, I would avoid boullion cubes and soy sauce unless I saw the brand and/ or it's label.  If it says wheat, don't eat it. If it says that a food "May or May Not Contain Gluten", don't eat it.

 

I think the only safe ingredient that I have found with wheat in it is wheat glucose, and I can't bring myself to eat it because of the word wheat.  LOL

 

If Kraft makes you sick, then skip it.  I think the others are just saying that based on their years of research and experiences, they doubt it was a gluten reaction.... It might have been, but it is much more likely to have had a reaction caused by something else or just as a result of being early into the recovery process (ei. the first couple of years).

 

The first few month gluten-free are tough.  There is a lot to relearn about cooking. As long as one gets in the habit of reading each label, you will probably be okay.  :)  Best wishes.

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I think what it comes down to is that if you have any doubts that it is gluten-free, after reading all the ingredients, then don't buy it or eat it.... That's where the "easy" comes into it.  We don't have to eat something if in doubt, and there have been many many times that I have gone hungry or eaten a couple of Lara Bars because I could not be sure my food was safe.  

 

Now I live in Canada so instances of confusion have become more infrequent because if a product has wheat or gluten (or eggs, or mustard, or nuts, etc) it mus be listed on the ingredients - it's our law.  That being said, I was on vacation out of my province and passing bakeries or farmer's markets that sold some gluten-free products. I skipped them because I don't trust other people to prepare food for me safely when most do not understand cc.  They might have made it without gluten containing ingredients but it may have picked up gluten from cooking implements or from a contaminated surface or sugar bag.  Is it Boston Pizza that sells a so-called gluten-free pizza, which is made right next to the normal pizzas, by a bunch of teens who probably don't care much?  Educated celiacs won't eat that either.

 

If you are not sure that a product is safe you can check here but it is best to check with the manufacturers. If you are satisfied with their food safety then you can buy it; if not, skip it.  It's just food.  You may be inconvenienced but we have to be responsible for our own health.

 

GlutenDude's blog is pretty good about sniffing out foods that could hurt us.  I think that is why the blog link was posted.  Amy's pizza claims to be gluten-free but it may not be since the facility it is made at is not. It is not certified gluten-free, they just say gluten-free on the label... That's why we have to read every label.

 

In the foods listed above, a few items obviously have gluten due to wheat content. Some are known to usually have gluten because we have read those labels and know the ingredients - for instance, I would avoid boullion cubes and soy sauce unless I saw the brand and/ or it's label.  If it says wheat, don't eat it. If it says that a food "May or May Not Contain Gluten", don't eat it.

 

I think the only safe ingredient that I have found with wheat in it is wheat glucose, and I can't bring myself to eat it because of the word wheat.  LOL

 

If Kraft makes you sick, then skip it.  I think the others are just saying that based on their years of research and experiences, they doubt it was a gluten reaction.... It might have been, but it is much more likely to have had a reaction caused by something else or just as a result of being early into the recovery process (ei. the first couple of years).

 

The first few month gluten-free are tough.  There is a lot to relearn about cooking. As long as one gets in the habit of reading each label, you will probably be okay.   :)  Best wishes.

 

So, now you are saying that even companies that test their products (Amy's) is not gluten-free????

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OK, it's obvious that you refuse to believe us. The fact is that if it contains wheat, it MUST say so on the label. That is a totally different law than the new FDA rule, and it has been in effect for years. Companies comply with that law because it is cut and dried. Wheat is one of the top 8 allergens and as an allergen, it can kill people just the way peanuts can kill an allergic person.

 

The new FDA rule is NOT so specific, nor is it so stringent. You keep insisting that if it is labeled gluten-free it HAS to be gluten-free. But here are a few snippets I got from the FDA website:

 

Are manufacturers required to test for gluten to make a gluten-free claim on their food labels?
No. The final rule does not specifically require manufacturers to test for the presence of gluten in their starting ingredients or finished foods labeled gluten-free.
 
 
Are there specific recordkeeping requirements for manufacturers who label foods gluten-free?
No. The final rule does not impose any specific new recordkeeping requirements for manufacturers who make a gluten-free claim on their food labels.
 
 
 
 
What gluten test methods should a manufacturer use if it elects to analyze its foods labeled gluten-free to ensure compliance with the final rule?
Manufacturers who elect to analyze their foods for gluten can select the test methods most appropriate for them, considering the type of foods they manufacture. Manufacturers are not obligated to use any one specific method to check for gluten in their foods. FDA recommends the use of scientifically valid methods in order for the gluten test results obtained to be reliable and consistent.
 
However, as discussed in the final rule, FDA is aware that sandwich ELISA methods do not adequately detect gluten in fermented and hydrolyzed foods. Because scientifically valid methods currently are lacking that can do so, we intend to issue a proposed rule on this issue.
 
 
 
OK, so you see that companies are NOT required to test, and that if they ELECT to test they can use any test they choose. The FDA RECOMMENDS they use a scientifically valid testing method, but does not REQUIRE it. Companies are not required to keep records. And the really important one which was mentioned to you before - the Elisa tests do NOT work on certain foods.
 
You remind me of some of my guitar students. They come to me for lessons and then refuse to practice what I teach them. I even had one guy who would come back week after week and say he didn't practice the lesson I gave him but he found a cool song on the internet and practiced that. And like a lot of things on the internet, there are many songs posted in tablature that are completely wrong. He couldn't figure out why he wasn't getting anywhere. He was wasting his money and both his time and mine. Eventually he quit taking lessons.
 
You came here seeking advice and no matter what you CLAIM, you have NOT gotten conflicting advice from us. We've been at this for years and know what we're talking about, so much so that SEVERAL members were told by their DOCTORS to come here to learn about the diet. And yet you refuse to believe a word any of us tells you! Why???

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SMRI- BREATHE. I am not trying to be a b%$@# in any of what I say next so please don't take any of it that way.

Yes, some products that claim to be gluten free from a shared facility are at one time or another not going to be gluten-free. New employees aren't properly trained, the cleaning process isn't done right, mistakes happen. People need to make their own choices about shared facilities, and no one is going to care either way what personal choices others make.

When I said earlier that people look for gluten in places it really isn't, I meant it. I didn't mean you personally. Four months ago I was where you are right now. I was worried that I was missing gluten, why did I feel like crap all the time, what am I doing wrong? Am I not being diligent enough? What am I doing wrong? What I was doing wrong was over thinking everything. It made me very paranoid about food in general. I was thinking how can I really know what is safe? The answer is, you can't 100% of the time know what you are eating is safe unless you prepare it yourself and it's whole foods. I frankly don't want to have to live my life like that, constantly looking over my shoulder to see if gluten is chasing me down. I have learned that I have to have a little faith in the food industry to do their jobs and know how to do them, for the sake of people's health. I can't live my life wondering where gluten is hiding. If I did that, I would have to question every item I bought at the store that is processed in any way, meat included. I would have to move to a deserted island and be totally self sufficient to know I am 100% gluten free all the time. While if I had the money to do that, I probably would, but I don't. I just pray every day that I can continue to trust the products I do buy, and keep forgoing the ones that I can't no matter how much I might want them.

I think every new celiac has this initial paranoia about food, it's natural. But it goes away with time. I am still a little gun shy when it comes to food, I have eaten in a restaurant once in six months. I only eat food at a few places other than home. I have broadened my horizons from a few months ago and am even thinking of going to Red Robin in a few weeks. Baby steps.

Like you said, people also are caught looking in the wrong direction when food makes them ill. It isn't always gluten and I have seen some on here that seem to always think it is.

And just a side note, I am remodeling and painting my newly acquired house and the color of my ceiling is ripe wheat and the color of my walls in the kitchen and the living room is cracked wheat. Had to do it.

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SMRI- BREATHE. I am not trying to be a b%$@# in any of what I say next so please don't take any of it that way.Yes, some products that claim to be gluten free from a shared facility are at one time or another not going to be gluten-free. New employees aren't properly trained, the cleaning process isn't done right, mistakes happen. People need to make their own choices about shared facilities, and no one is going to care either way what personal choices others make.When I said earlier that people look for gluten in places it really isn't, I meant it. I didn't mean you personally. Four months ago I was where you are right now. I was worried that I was missing gluten, why did I feel like crap all the time, what am I doing wrong? Am I not being diligent enough? What am I doing wrong? What I was doing wrong was over thinking everything. It made me very paranoid about food in general. I was thinking how can I really know what is safe? The answer is, you can't 100% of the time know what you are eating is safe unless you prepare it yourself and it's whole foods. I frankly don't want to have to live my life like that, constantly looking over my shoulder to see if gluten is chasing me down. I have learned that I have to have a little faith in the food industry to do their jobs and know how to do them, for the sake of people's health. I can't live my life wondering where gluten is hiding. If I did that, I would have to question every item I bought at the store that is processed in any way, meat included. I would have to move to a deserted island and be totally self sufficient to know I am 100% gluten free all the time. While if I had the money to do that, I probably would, but I don't. I just pray every day that I can continue to trust the products I do buy, and keep forgoing the ones that I can't no matter how much I might want them.I think every new celiac has this initial paranoia about food, it's natural. But it goes away with time. I am still a little gun shy when it comes to food, I have eaten in a restaurant once in six months. I only eat food at a few places other than home. I have broadened my horizons from a few months ago and am even thinking of going to Red Robin in a few weeks. Baby steps.Like you said, people also are caught looking in the wrong direction when food makes them ill. It isn't always gluten and I have seen some on here that seem to always think it is.And just a side note, I am remodeling and painting my newly acquired house and the color of my ceiling is ripe wheat and the color of my walls in the kitchen and the living room is cracked wheat. Had to do it.

I am sure those a very lovely colors, with very unfortunate names!

When I was new, I looked for products made by Con- Agra & Kraft. I knew they would clearly label the gluten incase I missed it in the ingredients. Please, no one argue with that.... That is just a fact of what I did years ago. It made things easier and worked for me.

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OK, it's obvious that you refuse to believe us. The fact is that if it contains wheat, it MUST say so on the label. That is a totally different law than the new FDA rule, and it has been in effect for years. Companies comply with that law because it is cut and dried. Wheat is one of the top 8 allergens and as an allergen, it can kill people just the way peanuts can kill an allergic person.

 

The new FDA rule is NOT so specific, nor is it so stringent. You keep insisting that if it is labeled gluten-free it HAS to be gluten-free. But here are a few snippets I got from the FDA website:

 

Are manufacturers required to test for gluten to make a gluten-free claim on their food labels?

No. The final rule does not specifically require manufacturers to test for the presence of gluten in their starting ingredients or finished foods labeled gluten-free.

 
 
Are there specific recordkeeping requirements for manufacturers who label foods gluten-free?

No. The final rule does not impose any specific new recordkeeping requirements for manufacturers who make a gluten-free claim on their food labels.

 
 
 
 
What gluten test methods should a manufacturer use if it elects to analyze its foods labeled gluten-free to ensure compliance with the final rule?

Manufacturers who elect to analyze their foods for gluten can select the test methods most appropriate for them, considering the type of foods they manufacture. Manufacturers are not obligated to use any one specific method to check for gluten in their foods. FDA recommends the use of scientifically valid methods in order for the gluten test results obtained to be reliable and consistent.

 
However, as discussed in the final rule, FDA is aware that sandwich ELISA methods do not adequately detect gluten in fermented and hydrolyzed foods. Because scientifically valid methods currently are lacking that can do so, we intend to issue a proposed rule on this issue.
 
 
 
OK, so you see that companies are NOT required to test, and that if they ELECT to test they can use any test they choose. The FDA RECOMMENDS they use a scientifically valid testing method, but does not REQUIRE it. Companies are not required to keep records. And the really important one which was mentioned to you before - the Elisa tests do NOT work on certain foods.
 
You remind me of some of my guitar students. They come to me for lessons and then refuse to practice what I teach them. I even had one guy who would come back week after week and say he didn't practice the lesson I gave him but he found a cool song on the internet and practiced that. And like a lot of things on the internet, there are many songs posted in tablature that are completely wrong. He couldn't figure out why he wasn't getting anywhere. He was wasting his money and both his time and mine. Eventually he quit taking lessons.
 
You came here seeking advice and no matter what you CLAIM, you have NOT gotten conflicting advice from us. We've been at this for years and know what we're talking about, so much so that SEVERAL members were told by their DOCTORS to come here to learn about the diet. And yet you refuse to believe a word any of us tells you! Why???

 

 

The new FDA rule says that if they are using the gluten-free label it must be less than 20 PPM...I posted that a long time ago along with a link to the FDA site--you seem to keep skipping over that part....I never said they were required to test.  I said if they were using the gluten-free label it had to meet FDA guidelines of 20 PPM or less....and yes, if you read posts, there is conflicting advice given constantly....you remind me of my former students that would not READ...cripes!!!

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The new FDA rule says that if they are using the gluten-free label it must be less than 20 PPM...I posted that a long time ago along with a link to the FDA site--you seem to keep skipping over that part....I never said they were required to test.  I said if they were using the gluten-free label it had to meet FDA guidelines of 20 PPM or less....and yes, if you read posts, there is conflicting advice given constantly....you remind me of my former students that would not READ...cripes!!!

I thought you had the concept before.... But I guess not. The point we are trying to make is - if they don't test but say it's less than 20 ppm then who really knows? Yes, it's supposed to be less than 20 ppm. Probably is. But unless the goverment has a reason to think its not in compliance, then they will not test the product.

For example, just because the goverment says the speed limit is 25 mph, doesn't mean every driver is going less than 25 mph. And sometimes, drivers going above the goverment limit get caught, but most of the time, they don't. Most of the time, drivers will understand the need for the limit, or just like to follow rules, or be afraid of the punishment - and will stay under the 25 mph goverment limit. Insert food companies for drivers and 20 ppm for the speed limit.

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OK, I'm done. We are trying to help you but you don't want to be helped. Do what you want. Eat what you want. You are a drowning person who keeps batting away the life preserver people are throwing your way. I wish you well but I'm done beating my head against your brick wall.

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