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micaldrew

Any Suggestions On Cookbooks?

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I am sort of new on this whole gluten free stuff. I tried this gluten-free diet over 3 years ago and it did not go well for me. I just didn't know what I was doing. I am going to really do it this time. I need to get a cookbook for meals. Does anyone have any favorites they could share with me? I bought one a while ago but was not impressed. Please help!! Thank you!!

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I bought The Best Gluten Free Family Cookbook and 125 Best Gluten Free Recipes by Donna Washburn. I haven't used them much so don't know if they'd appeal to you or not. I also have Annalise Roberts cookbook Gluten Free Baking Classics, which has breads, muffins, cakes, cookies type stuff.


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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Betty Hagmans books are great and there is quite a few of them.


Rusla

Asthma-1969

wheat/ dairy allergies, lactose/casein intolerance-1980

Multiple food, environmental allergies

allergic to all antibiotics except sulpha

Rheumitoid arthritis,Migraine headaches,TMJ- 1975

fibromyalgia-1995

egg allergy-1997

msg allergy,gall bladder surgery-1972

Skin Biopsy positive DH-Dec.1 2005, confirmed celiac disease

gluten-free totally since Nov. 28, 2005

Hashimoto's Hypothyroidism- 2005

Pernicious Anemia 1999 (still anemic on and off.)

Osteoporosis Aug. 2006

Creative people need maids.

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I am sort of new on this whole gluten free stuff. I tried this gluten-free diet over 3 years ago and it did not go well for me. I just didn't know what I was doing. I am going to really do it this time. I need to get a cookbook for meals. Does anyone have any favorites they could share with me? I bought one a while ago but was not impressed. Please help!! Thank you!!

My favorite is Carol Fensters "Special Diet Solutions" AND, The recipes on Bob's Red Mill internet site. http://www.bobsredmill.com/recipe/search.p...A+search+%3A%3A

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Anything by Bette Hagman is worth having. You can search by author on amazon .com. The Gluten Free Kitchen by Robin Ryberg is excellent. Also, The Incredible Edible Gluten Free Food for Kids cookbook by Shari L. Sanderson. Those are all good. You may also want to check out Living Gluten Free for Dummies. It's one of the yellow and black dummies books. There aren't a ton of recipes, but there's great information about the diet.


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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I have to say that while I love gluten-free cookbooks for baking, I've not been impressed with gluten-free cookbooks for meals.

I've had the best luck by looking for regular recipes and substituting gluten-free ingredients. CookingLight.com has a fantastic recipe collection.


ELIZABETH

gluten-free (04.17.2006)

corn-free (03.27.2007)

xanthan gum-free

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oh yeah... for online recipes, both allrecipes.com and epicurious.com have a gluten free recipe section. most recipes can easily be adapted to be gluten free or are already naturally gluten free.


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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The Real Food Daily cookbook by Anne Gentry is good for recipes that are gluten- and dairy-free. Some of the recipes do actuallyc all for flours, but they are easy to substitute.


Enterolab:

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 20 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 9 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 1223 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 18 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 8,7)

Gastritis dx 10/24

Eosinophilia of large bowel dx 10/29

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Check out "Saving Dinner" by Leanne Ely . . . it's not a gluten free cookbook, but many of her recipes are naturally gluten free or very easily modified. And they are all really good. She's also got a website, which I think is www.savingdinner.com

Good luck!

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Check out "Saving Dinner" by Leanne Ely . . . it's not a gluten free cookbook, but many of her recipes are naturally gluten free or very easily modified. And they are all really good. She's also got a website, which I think is www.savingdinner.com

Good luck!

Hey gluten-free Betsy...by any chance are you a flybaby? Odd question (if you aren't...but I am).

Kelly


Kelly Z

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If I could only own 1 gluten free cookbook it would be "The Gluten Free Kitchen" by Robyn Ryberg. Basic comfort food, and for the most part, easy to follow and make. The best thing is that you don't need a bunch of flours as most, if not all, of her recipes use only corn starch and potato starch.

Good cooking! And hang in there as there is a learning curve involved in gluten-free baking.

-Cathy

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I second the "Saving Dinner" cookbook...really excellent, yummy, healthy meals and they give you a weekly shopping list with everything you need for the entire week's dinners. I have rarely had to discount a meal in her book due to gluten, almost always you can just change a few ingredients and you're good to go. It really made a difference in our family meals, and I recommend it to everybody!

I did flylady for awhile, it's a great website!


"I will say of the Lord, 'He is my refuge and my fortress, my God, in whom I trust.'" -Psalm 91

gluten-free since January 26th, 2005

Feeling up and down, but better!

Mommy of a gluten-free 8 yr old, a 6 yr old who (much to her dismay) will be gluten-free soon and a 2 yr old who is so far symptom-free. Contemplating putting the whole family on the gluten-free diet since crumbs have become my nemisis!

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If I could only own 1 gluten free cookbook it would be "The Gluten Free Kitchen" by Robyn Ryberg. Basic comfort food, and for the most part, easy to follow and make. The best thing is that you don't need a bunch of flours as most, if not all, of her recipes use only corn starch and potato starch.

-Cathy

I completely agree! This is the cookbook I reach for most often :)


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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The best book I've purchased so far is the Annalise Roberts' book Gluten Free Baking Classics. I can't get over how great the breads and cakes are. She's done something right. The pumpkin bread I made was just like a wheat pumpkin bread. My wife made herself a regular loaf and they looked just alike. Unlike other recipes I've had in the past, Annalise recipes actually rise like regular loaves of bread. Most gluten-free recipes are gritty and dense.


Positive Biopsy - February 2006

Positive Bloodwork - December 2005

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For those who might be interested in ethnic recipes, Nancy Baker has written a recipe book called Globally Gluten Free where she collected recipes from around the world in her capacity as a wife to a diplomat. She just released a second edition and I believe you can even get in electronically (as an e-book) for $10, or in print form.

I've tried some of the recipes and look forward to trying more, in particular her croissant recipe which looks complicated but sounds promising enough to be worth the effort.

http://www.theceliacsite.com/globally-gluten-free.php

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Hi Mamatide

I heard that book was a keeper. Maybe you could share the croissant recipe from the book. I know that with Annalise Roberts "Classic Baking) she allow her recipes to be copied as long as we use her name & cookbook.....

I haven't been able to find the Globally Gluten Free one yet.(Locally) Are alot of the recipes high end?

mamaw

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For those who might be interested in ethnic recipes, Nancy Baker has written a recipe book called Globally Gluten Free where she collected recipes from around the world in her capacity as a wife to a diplomat. She just released a second edition and I believe you can even get in electronically (as an e-book) for $10, or in print form.

I've tried some of the recipes and look forward to trying more, in particular her croissant recipe which looks complicated but sounds promising enough to be worth the effort.

http://www.theceliacsite.com/globally-gluten-free.php

Has anyone tried the croissant recipe? Would it be worth buying the book for?


Started gluten-free Diet June 22, 2005

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I love Karen Robertson's book. I think it's called Cooking Gluten-Free. It has everything- from baking breads and muffins to making gluten-free meals. It has some basic recipes and some more elaborate recipes too.

We've really enjoyed the gluten-free granola recipe in this book and I've tried some of the main course dishes too.


Suzie

London, ON, Canada

celiac disease diagnosed by pos tTG March 2006 and pos biopsy June 2006

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Gluten-free croissants! Are you kidding! WOW that would be great.

BTW- we made gluten-free cream puffs recently and they were really good. Here is the recipe:

http://www.gfutah.org/recipes/Cream_Puffs.html


Suzie

London, ON, Canada

celiac disease diagnosed by pos tTG March 2006 and pos biopsy June 2006

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I've been trying to adapt all of my own recipes with replacing with gluten free options.

I have a blog - www.Lame Advertisement.com . I share my weekly menus and recipes, if you're interested in looking at it, go for it (don't feel pressured too, no biggie).

Also if you google gluten free recipes you can find A LOT of FREE information....Even www.allrecipes.com and www.recipezaar.com have a lot of gluten free recipes.

Sorry, I'm a cheapskate - I'm not one to pay for something I can get for free :D LOL

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I have yet to buy a gluten free cookbook, I find that the recipe sites people have already mentioned work well for me, and the gluten free blogs people have made are a fabulous resource. There are at least a half dozen that have wonderful recipes.

Can they be posted here? (if you are interested)

You could also do a blog search, type gluten free, and a list will come up...

I hope you find some good stuff!!


Gluten free since Sept. 2006

Improved on gluten free diet

Enterolab results confirmed suspicions on Jan. 29th 2007

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I agree the Betty Hagman cookbooks have been very helpful.I I use the comfort foods and a wheat and gluten free revised additon.


"There is always a Brighter side to every situation"

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The Gluten Free Kitchen has the best tasting corn bread, biscuits and cinnamon rolls that I have tasted in 2 years. My family like all of these = I come from a biscuit and gravey back ground and this is pretty good. :rolleyes: Some times I add a little rice flour to put a little more texure in some of but not really necessary.


Brenda Diagnosed Celiac 2005 Woodville, Massachusetts

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my favorite cookbook is "Life Tastes Good Again" from www.eatingglutenfree.com


Sweetfudge

Born and raised in Portland, OR; Currently living in Provo, UT

Gluten-free since June 2006

Also living with Hypoglycemia since 1991

Dairy-free for good since summer 2008

Started IBS diet and probiotics at GI's recommendation - Fall 2008

Also avoiding: potatoes, beans, crucifers, popcorn, most red meat, coconut milk :(

Started eating a Paleo diet Spring 2011. Love it!

The grass is always greener where you water it.

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