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KrisT

"bush's Best"- Baked Beans - Safe

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I don't know if this was already posted or not, but I just bought a can of my favorite baked beans because the ingredients looked safe, but I emailed them just to be sure. Here is their response...

Thank you for contacting us.

As of this date, all of our BUSH'S BEST products are gluten-free with the exception of our BUSH'S BEST Chili Beans, our BUSH'S Chili Magic Chili Starter line, and our Bush's Homestyle Chili line.

We do use corn starch in some of our products, but it does not contain gliadin gluten from wheat, barley, oats, or rye grains which may cause adverse responses in persons suffering from Celiac Sprue. In addition, any vinegar used in our products is corn-based and distilled.

I hope this information is helpful. Please keep in mind that we are constantly expanding our product line and may add new products that contain potential allergens. Additional ingredient information can be found in the ingredients listing on the label or by checking the "Product Q&A" section of our web site. If you are still unsure, please email us via our web site: www.bushbeans.com.

Sincerely,

Teesee Moore

Consumer Relations Coordinator

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Thanks KrisT :)

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It may not be homemade, but they are good! :)

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I got the exact same, verbatim response from a Ms. Kenna Hess, Customer Relations Coordinator in June 2008.

Now go read the labels of Bush's Best Honey flavored beans along with the Boston Baked Beans flavor. You'll clearly note MODIFIED FOOD STARCH (not corn starch) as an ingredient. No corn specification is made and in more cases than not, that means flour or GLUTEN! In the Bush's response above, it's stated that they use corn starch in SOME of their products. They're not saying they use corn starch in all products other than the chili lines.

This suggests that Bush's Best representatives will send out their template rubber stamp response to anyone using the word "GLUTEN" without knowing their products or the facts. I pray I'm wrong, but in too many cases, modified food starch means flour, which means gluten.

So, it would appear that you have more to avoid than their Chili flavors and while we're at it... are they processing the gluten filled beans on the same line(s) as the alleged gluten free flavors?

If you are anywhere near a Wegman's, they have the guts to clearly state "Gluten Free" on their beans (labels) which, by the way, taste just as good (if not better) and cost less. You won't find modified food starch in their ingredients!

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Modified Food Starch is safe for those with Celiac. The only instance it would not be is if it said "Modified Food Starch - Wheat".

  • Upvote 1

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WHAT!? You have to be kidding!

Modified Food Stach = FLOUR (as in wheat). I have heard about wheat being a "top 8 allergen" and some legal requirements to list allergens (as of recent legislation) but I have been warned that "modified food starch," at least as of now, meets that requirement because it is so vastly presumed to consist of wheat based flour.

Otherwise, I belive you have it backwards. Modified food starch is presumed to be wheat unless it's specified otherwise, i.e. if it's not wheat or flour, it might read, "modified corn starch."

If you can prove me wrong, I would actually be very happy and relieved. But I have been told by food manufacturers and doctors (and have seen plastered throughout this very website) that MFS = wheat.

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Modified food starch can be from any starch. Modified food starch itself does not equal wheat. Flour does not equal wheat.

wheat, potato, corn, tapioca, rice, (etc) are some examples.

The FDA Allergy Labeling Law requires that any of the 8 main allergens (wheat is one) be listed. If it says Modified Food Starch, and does not list wheat, then it is safe.

Here is some more info on the allergen labeling law that you may find useful : http://americanceliac.org/ACDA%20Food%20La...011-05Final.pdf

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Providing some more info, as there is a lot of outdated information ---- because laws and regulations change.

From the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness: http://www.celiaccentral.org/What_is_Celia.../67/vobId__216/

"Thankfully, new legislation requires that by the year 2006, manufacturers must clearly list wheat as an ingredient, even if it is in the form of another ingredient (e.g., modified food starch)."

Also:

From gluten free living magazine http://glutenfreeliving.com/ingredient.php#modifiedfood

"Modified food starch

An ingredient made from a variety of starches. Modified food starch is gluten free unless it is made from wheat. If modified food starch is made from wheat, "wheat" will appear on the label. Also, more and more companies are listing all sources of modified food starch voluntarily."

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Wheat is an allergen that can cause anaphylaxis and death. There is no minimum acceptable amount.

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006,

What you heard about MFS is outdated/incorrect information. Happygirl is absolutely right--if MFS is made from wheat, it would have to be listed as such on the label. If just "modified food starch" appears, you can rest assured that ingredient is gluten-free.

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http://www.celiaccentral.org/What_is_Celia...By/67/vobId__21 - sorry this link did not work, but I copied and pasted.

Modified Food Starch: Modified food starch can be derived from many sources: corn, tapioca, potato, wheat, or other starches. Most modified food starch in North America is derived from non-gluten-containing sources. It is still prudent, however, to check with the manufacturer, asking from what source the modified food starch is derived.

Laura posted some great information! I usually don't worry about MFS.

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Under the US law effective January 1, 2006, wheat must be disclosed by the word "wheat." No other words are acceptable under the law. Even ordinary flour must be labeled as "wheat flour," "flour (wheat)" or a statement under the ingredients in the same size type stating "Contains: Wheat." There is no minimum which can be overlooked.

Rye, barley and oats can still be hidden legally, but many major companies voluntarily disclose all gluten sources. Kraft is one such company.

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I spoke with a Director of Compliance at Bush Bros and he did guarantee me that all Bush's best flavors other than the Chili line is gluten free. He said his MFS is corn based. What a relief. Fair is fair so I felt very compelled to make this update and happily admit that I was wrong.

I can't let the response about flour not being wheat go, however. I think that respondant should get the point. The most popular all purpose flour out there is wheat based. Any grocery store isle will confirm that when you see the quantity of wheat derived flour dwarfing all other sources.

Nonetheless, I learned something here and it's encouraging. I am still going to question companies on MFS to be sure.

Thank you all for the replies!!

And, praises to Bush's Best for calling me and taking the time to provide assurances. I ate the Bush's Best black beans today!

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I can't let the response about flour not being wheat go, however. I think that respondant should get the point. The most popular all purpose flour out there is wheat based. Any grocery store isle will confirm that when you see the quantity of wheat derived flour dwarfing all other sources.

There are two separate issues here--"flour" listed as an ingredient must be followed by the word "wheat" if it is indeed from wheat.

The fact that there is primarily wheat flour in the baking aisle in the supermarket is something else altogether. One has nothing to do with the other.

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Despite the info provided by Bush, as a celiac I have found that I do have gluten-like symptoms when I eat their beans. I can't explain it though, but I definitely find myself getting visibly bloated after eating them and in the hours and days that follow, I feel gluten-like fatigue and get restless legs which are for me hallmark signs that I have eaten something containing gluten. I don't know what it is, but it is a bummer because I do like their products.

Edited by Glutenfreegurrrl
typo

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56 minutes ago, Glutenfreegurrrl said:

Despite the info provided by Bush, as a celiac I have found that I do have gluten-like symptoms when I eat their beans. I can't explain it though, but I definitely find myself getting visibly bloated after eating them and in the hours and days that follow, I feel gluten-like fatigue and get restless legs which are for me hallmark signs that I have eaten something containing gluten. I don't know what it is, but it is a bummer because I do like their products.

This a pretty old posting and labeling laws have changed.  Bush’s beans used to be labeled gluten free, but not anymore. Although the beans might not contain gluten ingredients, the company probably does not test to insure it is under 20 ppm.  I have yet to find canned beans that are labeled gluten free.  I have see chili labeled gluten-free but that falls under the USDA requirements not the FDA.  

Beans are often grown in wheat fields.  They are probably mechanically sorted at harvest.     The government allows some contamination (e.g. rocks, etc) in raw agricultural products.  So, I prefer to buy dry beans and wash and sort them prior to cooking.  And yes....I have found rocks, but have not found wheat yet!  I guess I am lucky.  

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They do say they are gluten-free on the website.

 

“Are your products gluten-free?

All BUSH'S® canned bean products are gluten-free. We do use corn starch in some of our products, but it does not contain gliadin gluten from wheat, barley, oats or rye grains, which may cause adverse responses in people suffering from Celiac Sprue. In addition, any vinegar used in our canned bean products is corn-based and distilled.”

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Yes, but...the Baked Bean cans used to actually say gluten free. I have a case in my pantry set to expire in 2020.  The cans no longer say gluten free on the label (I did not even notice).    The ingredients list does not reveal gluten.    I bet they decided against testing for gluten (to save money and hassle).  This is not because of the FDA requirement per say, but most likely the advice of their attorneys.  

This is from the FDA site directed to manufacturers:

“The rule does not require you to test for the presence of gluten in your starting ingredients or finished foods labeled “gluten-free.”  However, you are responsible for ensuring that foods bearing a gluten-free claim meet our requirements, including that any unavoidable gluten present in a food labeled gluten-free is less than 20 ppm. We encourage you to use effective measures to ensure that any foods labeled as “gluten-free” comply with our requirements; such measures may include:

  • testing the ingredients to determine their gluten content;
  • requesting certificates of gluten analysis from ingredient suppliers; or
  • participating in a third-party gluten-free certification program.

If you choose to have someone, such as a laboratory, test ingredients for their gluten content, we suggest that you consider whether the laboratory is capable of testing food ingredients for gluten and ask what type of test it uses. For example, we are aware that the R5-Mendez Method (sometimes referred to as the ELISA R5 Mendez Method) and another test method known as the “Morinaga method” can be used to detect gluten in a variety of food matrices.”

https://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/ucm402549.htm

It would be interesting to find out exactly what happened.  It might be the same as the See’s Candies situation.

Edited by cyclinglady

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