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BridgetteB

Bread

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I am a newer celiac, and I have yet to find a bread that I like. I have tried whole foods, kinnikkinnick, etc but nothing really tastes good. Any suggestions would be welcome.

Another issue I have not seen discussed is cheating. I have no pain or real GI distress when I ate gluten, I was diagnosised by chance during an edoscopy(looking for an ulcer!) If I have been a celiac my whole life, as I am told. Once my intesting heals is it ok to cheat occasionally?

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Definately no cheating. You would only cause yourself more damage and who knows what other problems down the line.

There is a thread called "the best gluten free bread ever" or something of that nature started by mamaw that is really good if you want to make your own bread.


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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I am a newer celiac, and I have yet to find a bread that I like. I have tried whole foods, kinnikkinnick, etc but nothing really tastes good. Any suggestions would be welcome.

Another issue I have not seen discussed is cheating. I have no pain or real GI distress when I ate gluten, I was diagnosised by chance during an edoscopy(looking for an ulcer!) If I have been a celiac my whole life, as I am told. Once my intesting heals is it ok to cheat occasionally?

No it is NOT okay to cheat. Chances are you will have enough of a problem with CC after a bit to make this idea out of the question.

This will most likely sound off the wall but.... If you are new to the diet you may want to avoid substitutes for gluten foods for a bit. If you can wait a couple months before adding in things like gluten-free bread you may find them more acceptable when you do. I did a lot of lettuce wraps for the first few months and found once my body and brain had forgotten what the posion breads were that the gluten-free were much more palatable. Also make sure when you do use gluten-free bread that you read the labels, many are parbaked and if you don't microwave or toast them before use they just fall apart or have the texture of cardboard.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Cheating is not ok. If you are healed, its only as permanent as you are gluten free. If you ingest gluten, your body turns a switch on, and damage occurs. The goal is to keep the switch off (the autoimmune switch). Symptoms do not equal damage.

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We like 2 breads in our family. One is the Gluten Free Pantry Favorite Sandwich Bread--it's the closest thing we've found to real white bread. I also make foccacia out of it that is absolutely delicious. The other mix I use is Pamela's Wheat Free Bread Mix, which is my daughter's favorite. They are both very easy to make. I use my kitchenaid and just pop it in the oven.

I've make Lorka's flax bread as well and it is also very good...


Dx'd with lymphocytic colitis 1/07

Dx'd by Enterolab 3/07--+IgA, +Ttg, DQ2 and DQ8

Dx'd celiac by Dr. Lewey 4/07--without +blood or biopsy

gluten-free 3/7/07

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I tried this bread at a local gluten free food fair and it's the best gluten free bread that I have had. It kind of reminds me of traditional potato bread because it kind of has a yellow color, but it does not taste like potato bread and it was really moist--not hard and crumbly. (I thought the bread was great, but I don't think that my son will like any gluten free bread, period. :unsure: ) They also make a variety of other gluten-free goodies like scones, brownies, cookies, granola bars, and more.

Angeline's Bakery:

http://www.angelinesbakery.com/


Jenny

Son 6 yrs old, Positive blood work, Outstanding dietary response, no biopsy.

Household mostly gluten free since 3/07

Me: HLA-DQ 02 & 0302 (DQ 08), which I ran & analyzed myself!Currently gluten lite, negative tTG, asymptomatic

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Thanks to all for the insight, I will try to never cheat, but I do miss a really cold rolling rock!

I will also try some of the bread suggestions, or do my corn tortilla wraps again. As I am new to this, does anyone have any other immune issues? I have a primary immune disease(genetic, IGg deficient) and I recieve a blood product once a month. Since this is a pooled product I wonder if I am getting other peoples immune problems? Any thoughts?

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I am a newer celiac, and I have yet to find a bread that I like. I have tried whole foods, kinnikkinnick, etc but nothing really tastes good. Any suggestions would be welcome.

Another issue I have not seen discussed is cheating. I have no pain or real GI distress when I ate gluten, I was diagnosised by chance during an edoscopy(looking for an ulcer!) If I have been a celiac my whole life, as I am told. Once my intesting heals is it ok to cheat occasionally?

Hi BridgetteB,

Cheating is a NO - NO,

This diet is for life not just until you feel a bit better.

While you may not show any outward symptoms you are in fact doing

untold amount of damage internally.

I'm in my late 50's and was only dx'd Nov 2005,

6 months prior to that i gave up smoking after some 40+ yrs

It seems smoking prevents the onset of Adult Coeliac Disease.

I'm not for one moment advocating smoking as a means of prevention.

Smoking and Celiac Disease

I became very ill, lost a lot of weight, 56 pounds in 3 months, suffered

chronic vomiting and diahorrea, I thought I was dying.

I was so lethargic I could sleep 12 hrs and still feel like i wasn't in bed for a week

I suffered from vicious migrane headaches, Anemia, Rash's, lack of concentration

(sometimes refered to as brain fog) I was feeling so bad I wanted to die.

Since being on the Gluten Free diet I've regained the lost weight (+ some)

I feel great, I'm up at 6am each morn, full of energy, no more headaches,

anemia, rash etc.

I don't need to cheat because i now bake my own bread and cakes etc from scratch.

I don't want to go through that ever again, my villi are gradually returning to normal

and i can look forward positively to a better life.

There are too many possible complications associated with a continuing lifestyle

which includes gluten.

If your interested in a good bread recipe here's a link to mine.

(suppliers in comma's can be ignored as they are required by the Irish Coeliac Society

to show the ingredients are vetted and free from possible cross-contamination)

Bread Recipe

Best Regards,

David


Chronically Ill and lost 56lbs in 3 Months Prior to Diagnosis.

Diagnosed in Nov 2005 after Biopsy and Blood Tests

Cannot tolerate Codex Wheat Starch.

Self Taught Baker.

Bake everything from scratch using naturally gluten-free ingredients.

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Ok-I guess cheating is out. The homemade bread looks brilliant. I, however have never been a good baker. I may now be forced to try. It is a long weekend here so maybe I will give it a go....Thanks so much

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Thanks to all for the insight, I will try to never cheat, but I do miss a really cold rolling rock!

I will also try some of the bread suggestions, or do my corn tortilla wraps again. As I am new to this, does anyone have any other immune issues? I have a primary immune disease(genetic, IGg deficient) and I recieve a blood product once a month. Since this is a pooled product I wonder if I am getting other peoples immune problems? Any thoughts?

My biggest incentive to never cheat is to avoid developing any other immune system problems.

https://www.celiac.com/st_sresults.html?p_keyword=related

If there is something you are missing, post it here. Chances are someone will have a good suggestion for a substitution. At first, I had to keep telling myself it's like a light switch, on or off, gluten or no gluten. People kept relating it to an allergy which is usually like a dimmer switch, a little is okay, a little more may be a problem, a lot is a big problem.


Karen B.

diagnosed with Celiac Nov. 2003

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Cheating is a no no. I have a little sister that was diagnosed at a year with celiac. I think when she was a teenager they thought she was in remission. She was always anemic, started her period very late, had mono. She is now 45 years old and has persnicity anemia, fibromyalgia, thyroid, arthritis. She is lucky she had a healthy baby at 38 years old. She will still cheat to this day. I just started the gluten free diet the beginning of the year. I had so many symptoms disappear, the thought of cheating scares me. I think if she had always followed the diet, she wouldn't have all the health issues she has now. I do have thyroid, and betathaylmasia. (spelled wrong I'm sure). I also have asthma and other allergies. I only wish someone had caught this for me I'm 52 years old. I can look back at many itchy break outs. I think I got DH. I just can't see how it pays to cheat. I'm hoping to avoid any more problems myself.

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If you want to try a really great bread recipe, similar to bakery fresh white bread (not wonder sponge), use the classic white bread recipe in the Incredible Edible Gluten Free Foods for Kids cookbook by Shari L. Sanderson. Not only is the recipe fabulous, but it's relatively easy to prepare. If you don't want to follow a recipe, definitely try the Gluten Free Pantry's Favorite Sandwich Bread Mix. It's very easy to prepare and tasty. I generally add green peppers, onions, cheese, and garlic to mine. Yum! Tasty.

As far as cheating, I agree with the others, it's a definite no-no. Cheating can lead to permanent issues such as permanent neurological issues, cancer, osteoperosis, etc... So not worth it. There are thousands of substitute recipes floating around on this site. If you're ever craving something, just ask. Someone will have a suitable substitute recipe or brand for you to try. :)

If you miss Rolling Rock (my old favorite), try Red Bridge and Bard's Tale. They satisfy my beer cravings. Well, at least before I got pregnant they did. Bard's Tale is my favorite, but Red Bridge is MUCH cheaper and more readily available. I highly recommend it if you miss beer. Red Bridge is sold in Walmarts, unless you live in PA, then you can find it at a few select distributors. Ugh, PA... Anyway, definitely try some!


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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Hi!

Am also very new to this new way of life, BridgetteB. My symptoms weren't as bad as a lot of people's and I was very lucky to have been diagnosed within 1 month of seeing a doctor. I've been gluten free for a week now and am doing great. But something I learned yesterday is that even though you were virtually symptom free before, many people find that their reactions to gluten become much more aggravated after you've been "clean" for awhile. So I have to play a little "head-game" with myself (it's not hard, I'm not very bright :P ) and tell myself how miserable I'll be if I cheat even a little. My symptoms were not horrible, but they weren't pleasant by any means. So the thought of bloating up like a bullfrog again and having abdominal pain is enough to keep the gluten away. Even if the threat of disease down the road doesn't deter you, maybe the threat of immediate misery will. Sorry I can't offer any bread recipes. I am trying to keep it simple with the fruits, veggies, meat, and rice for now.

Just wanted to congratulate David on your accomplishment!!! That's so great you gave up smoking! You should be very proud. It's kind of funny. I only read this ONE place, so I don't know if it's true, but an article stated that sometimes switching to a low fat diet can trigger Celiac symptoms. In looking back, I my initial "symptoms" started soon after I lost 40 pounds. Go figure! Oh well, I'm still glad I did it. 201 pounds on a 5'-1" frame is not a good thing no matter how you look at it. Nor is smoking. So again, Congrats!

And what a doll Angie! So neat.

Thanks for all the great info All!

Lins

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Actually, there's no set standard for what triggers Celiac disease symptoms in a person. Some people have symptoms all their lives, some have a hormonal onset, like puberty or childbirth, some have other triggers. I had an emotional trigger, oddly enough. I personally think you're born with it, but sometimes there's a trigger that sets off certain symptoms later in life, which usually sends you to the doctor. When I was a kid I was always underweight and had a snotty nose all the time, so there's a clue. My doctors never figured it out, I figured it out on my own six months after the onset of GI symptoms a few years ago.


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

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Cheating will cause you not to heal. No cheating.

Now that's out of the way, my favorite bread is made from Gluten-Free Pantry's french bread & pizza mix. Any gluten-free bread is ALWAYS better if you make it from a mix. It actually tastes decent.

-Ash


-Diganosed with Celiac's Disease on April 15, 2005.

"Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life"-Picasso

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Ok-I guess cheating is out. The homemade bread looks brilliant. I, however have never been a good baker. I may now be forced to try. It is a long weekend here so maybe I will give it a go....Thanks so much

I can promise you that before my daughter had to go gluten free I was the worst cook ever. In the last year I've learned how to cook just about everything we eat from scratch. Start with the easy things like Pamela's pancake mix, Pamela's wheat-free bread, and the Gluten Free Pantry sandwich bread then work your way up to mixing your own flours (I'm not there yet).

The fresher gluten-free bread is, the better it tastes. Our whole house went gluten-free when my daughter was diagnosed, and I still can't eat some of the gluten-free breads unless it is toast or french toast or something like that. I can eat the bread I make myself just as I eat a loaf of wheat bread.

It takes some time to figure out all the "rules" but finding some staple comfort foods that are gluten-free will get you by until you get the hang of it (we live and die by Kinnickinick pizza crust!).

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I didn't like any of the store bought breads, so I just didn't eat bread until I started feeling well enough to cook my own. The best recipe I've found so far is in Bette Hagman's cookbook, The Gluten - Free Gourmet Bakes Bread. Her Four Flour Bread Mix is great.

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Thanks to all for the insight, I will try to never cheat, but I do miss a really cold rolling rock!

I will also try some of the bread suggestions, or do my corn tortilla wraps again. As I am new to this, does anyone have any other immune issues? I have a primary immune disease(genetic, IGg deficient) and I recieve a blood product once a month. Since this is a pooled product I wonder if I am getting other peoples immune problems? Any thoughts?

Not to beat a dead horse, but cheating is not worth the repercussions whether you feel them now or not. If you have another immune disease, and you cheat with the gluten-free stuff, you just make yourself more suceptable(sp) to other diseases, including cancer or lymphoma.

I have a really good and fairly easy white bread recipe that is fairly comparable to regular home-baked bread. If you want this, you can p.m. me and I will get it to you. I have also discovered the Chebe bread mixes this past week and even made them for a dinner party lastnight. I also served 'leaded' foccacia for those who do not observe gluten-free and they bypassed that bread for the Chebe braid that I made. Kind of bummed because I was looking forward to the leftovers for breakfast today. :(

Baking gluten free bread is much different, and in my opinion easier, than baking regular bread. You don't have all of the tedious kneading and waiting time. You have to get past the fact that the flours are so fine that they go everywhere if you turn the mixer up too high right away. But homemade is so much better than the store stuff.

I have to agree with another poster that if you can avoid the gluten-free breads for a while you will appreciate their flavor and texture better once your tastebuds have forgotten the regular stuff. I tried brown rice bread in the first week that I went gluten-free, which was the week of Thanksgiving. Did not even make it through one slice. Crumbled the rest up and it did make a really wonderful sage dressing but ack, the bread was nasty. Now after 3 1/2 months, I have come to really like the Ener-G light tapioca and light white rice breads. I only do them toasted for breakfast but they are what I am used to now the texture does not bother me as much.

Good luck.

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I just tried for the first time..Against the Grain gluten free baguette, (freezer section)

:rolleyes: Oh it was like coming home again after a long hard trip, expensive yes,

but worth the occasional treat :P

i thought it had good texture, and if you bake it like garlic bread it gets crusty..yum

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I am a newer celiac, and I have yet to find a bread that I like. I have tried whole foods, kinnikkinnick, etc but nothing really tastes good. Any suggestions would be welcome.

Another issue I have not seen discussed is cheating. I have no pain or real GI distress when I ate gluten, I was diagnosised by chance during an edoscopy(looking for an ulcer!) If I have been a celiac my whole life, as I am told. Once my intesting heals is it ok to cheat occasionally?

It really is more difficult for Celiac's who have not been extremely ill prior to diagnosis to stick to the diet. Those of us who almost died really get it. Don't cheat. It's not worth the consequences. Check the list of related illnesses on Celiac.com. Kathe

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I just gave up bread completely for a long while because I could not find one to satisfy me. They all kind of crumbled or dissolved when I bit in to them. None had the right chew, density or smell that bread was supposed to have.

Now I make my own, I like the "Crusty Sorghum Bread" recipe in Shauna James Ahern's book "Gluten-Free Girl" you can find an earlier version of the recipe on her blog of the same name. Ahhhh, my house smells like bread!

If you want pizza, whole foods sells their own crusts in the freezer section. If you bake them on higher heat than they suggest and let them go until almost slightly burned, they are sooooooo good. Chewy center, crispy crust...yum.

I also make my own pizza crust from the "because you're special" mix and it's relatively easy and quite good. I add fresh herbs to the dough and extra olive oil on top.

Good luck, experiment and don't give up!


"...I tried to explain to the waiter that I could not have anything with flour so he took the flower off the table..."

Live your life each day

greet the tides my friend

we're all nomads; forever on our way

a journey to the end.

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No it is NOT okay to cheat. Chances are you will have enough of a problem with CC after a bit to make this idea out of the question.

This will most likely sound off the wall but.... If you are new to the diet you may want to avoid substitutes for gluten foods for a bit. If you can wait a couple months before adding in things like gluten-free bread you may find them more acceptable when you do. I did a lot of lettuce wraps for the first few months and found once my body and brain had forgotten what the posion breads were that the gluten-free were much more palatable. Also make sure when you do use gluten-free bread that you read the labels, many are parbaked and if you don't microwave or toast them before use they just fall apart or have the texture of cardboard.

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I am a newer celiac, and I have yet to find a bread that I like. I have tried whole foods, kinnikkinnick, etc but nothing really tastes good. Any suggestions would be welcome.

Another issue I have not seen discussed is cheating. I have no pain or real GI distress when I ate gluten, I was diagnosised by chance during an edoscopy(looking for an ulcer!) If I have been a celiac my whole life, as I am told. Once my intesting heals is it ok to cheat occasionally?

Email me ceily55@verizon.net, I will email you my bread receipe you will need a bread machine to make it but it is the best bread so far I tried, I make a loaf every week.

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Email me ceily55@verizon.net, I will email you my bread receipe you will need a bread machine to make it but it is the best bread so far I tried, I make a loaf every week.

I also agree that Against the Grain Gourmet's Baguette rolls are incredible to make garlic bread. Also are their Against the Grain Gourmet Rolls. I have been craving sandwiches and could not find any rolls that I liked until I found Against the Grain Gourmet. I never thought I would ever have a sandwich again and I was wrong! SSOOO goood.

Dana :rolleyes:

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