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debmidge

Any Good Books Lately?

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Just looking for some suggestions: old and new titles; fiction and non fiction


Husband has Celiac Disease and

Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -

The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis

Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,

most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as

being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."

Serious Depressive state ensued

Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003

Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.

Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle

Developed neuropathy in 2005

Now has lymphadema 2006It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

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I just read The Glass Castle and could not put it down! Seems to be universally liked....check it out. :)


SUSIE

Diagnosed January 2006

"I like nonsense. It wakes up the brain cells." ~Dr. Seuss

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Any book by Jodi Picoult.....I love her!


Toni

Gluten Free - February 16, 2008

Diagnosed with positive bloodwork and biopsy.

No digestive symptoms for the past 25 years, but did have severe anemia, osteoporosis, lactose intolerance and RLS at time of diagnosis.

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Just looking for some suggestions: old and new titles; fiction and non fiction

Up Country, by Nelson DeMille.

This is a little of both (or evertything). I really enjoyed it and my Mother loves it too. First book I actually finished in years. It's a sequal to The General's Daughter.

best regards, lm

couple editorial reviews:

from a,m,a,z,o,n,.,c,o,m (not lame advertisement)

In Up Country, Nelson DeMille cannily revives the army career of Chief Warrant Officer Paul Brenner, the cynical, hardworking Criminal Investigation Division man who was forcibly retired after solving the high-profile killing in The General's Daughter. Brenner's called back to investigate the murder of a young army lieutenant by his captain. The catch is, the crime took place during the heat of the Tet Offensive, and the only living witness was a North Vietnamese soldier who described the incident in a 30-year-old letter that has only recently come to light. Soon Brenner, a Vietnam vet, is on an ostensible nostalgia tour of his old stomping grounds. The trip immediately turns dangerous as he heads "up country" to search for the letter writer, accompanied by a gorgeous American businesswoman, who's hiding more than even the smartest CID officer could imagine.

DeMille, who saw his own tour of duty in Vietnam (and even found a letter on a dead Vietnamese soldier), intersperses historical facts and chilling political possibilities with enough local color to provide some serious flashbacks for his fellow veterans. To non-vets the book may seem very long, but the payoff at the end is worth a couple hundred extra pages. --Barrie Trinkle --

From Publishers Weekly

That DeMille has written a sequel to The General's Daughter comes as no surprise; after all, that's arguably his best-known novel because of the hit film version starring John Travolta. Nor is it surprising that he's set this sequel in Vietnam; returning hero Chief Warrant Officer Paul Brenner, Ret., served two stints there during the war, and DeMille himself not only saw action in Nam but returned in 1997 for an extended visit. What is curious, and relatively unfortunate, is that the long narrative focuses so much on travelogue instead of intrigue and action; it's as if DeMille, a wickedly fine thriller writer, has been possessed by the soul of James Michener. Still, the overarching story line captivates, as Brenner agrees to return to Vietnam to track down a Vietnamese witness to a 30-year-old unprosecuted crime, in which a U.S. Army captain murdered an army lieutenant and plundered some treasure. Joined by beautiful Susan Weber, who says she's an American expat businesswoman doing a favor for the U.S. government, Brenner travels to the little village where the witness may still live; along the way, the pair flirt, sightsee, visit a nude beach, sightsee, have sex, sightsee, and talk a lot. The sightseeing carries serious emotional impact as Brenner processes his wartime past and Vietnam's present, and it carries serious risk, as Colonel Mang of the secret police tracks Brenner's and Susan's movements. There's some violence as the two Americans elude Mang and his minions, and a melodramatic finale as Brenner realizes just who the murderous captain now is, and some dramatic suspense as Brenner peels away layers of Susan's identity covers. And then there's blasted, resilient Vietnam, which DeMille captures expertly, in all its anguished pride. With a film version in development at Paramount and the Warner publicity machine working at top gear, expect this engrossing but not exceptional novel to shoot to the top. 15-city author tour.


gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

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I've been on an Orson Scott Card kick lately, rereading all my faves. I would recommend starting with Ender's Game (and the following books) or Wyrms. Very enthralling sci-fi.

I'm planning on hitting up the library for The Green Mile (Stephen King - I'm not usually a fan of his, too scary, but I LOVED this one). Another fun just fiction book I really enjoyed was called Rapture by David Sosnowski (about an up and coming virus that sweeps the world - Angelism). The Other Boleyn Girl was another book I couldn't put down!


Sweetfudge

Born and raised in Portland, OR; Currently living in Provo, UT

Gluten-free since June 2006

Also living with Hypoglycemia since 1991

Dairy-free for good since summer 2008

Started IBS diet and probiotics at GI's recommendation - Fall 2008

Also avoiding: potatoes, beans, crucifers, popcorn, most red meat, coconut milk :(

Started eating a Paleo diet Spring 2011. Love it!

The grass is always greener where you water it.

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I'm looking forward to seeing everyone's recommendations.

I re-reading The Good Earth by Pearl Buck- fiction about a farmer and his family in China

Frank McCourt books-non-fiction about an irishman who eventually emmigrates to the US and becomes a teacher in NYC

The Professor and the Madman- true story of the making of the dictionary

Life is Good- true story about a man in his 8th or 9th decade who finally learns to read and tells his life story

Land of a Thousand Hills- true story about a woman who marries, moves to Rwanda, divorces but stays on to run the plantion herself and much more

Snow Flower and the Secret Fan-fiction

A New England Nun-classic fiction

O Pioneers-classic fiction

The Shadow of the Wind-fiction about a mysterious book and author

My notes don't even begin to do these justice.


Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11

Son: ADHD '06,

neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07

ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08

ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08

Gluten-free-Feb. '09

other food allergies

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....I'm planning on hitting up the library for The Green Mile (Stephen King - I'm not usually a fan of his, too scary, but I LOVED this one)....

That was fabulous when it first came out. Released in serial form in six parts. About every three weeks and only $2.99 each. Not a horror book, but with a little supernatural aspect. The movie, also spectactular, directed by Frank Darabount, who also directed the Shawshank Redemption. Based on a story by Stephen King, without any horror or supernatural content. A great classic movie.

Recently released on DVD, The Mist. Another Stephen King, Frank Darabount collaboration. Very basic, old fashioned scary movie. Examines the horror outside, and inside us all. Be very forewarned, extremely shocking ending. :o

best regards, lm


gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

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That was fabulous when it first came out. Released in serial form in six parts. About every three weeks and only $2.99 each. Not a horror book, but with a little supernatural aspect. The movie, also spectactular, directed by Frank Darabount, who also directed the Shawshank Redemption. Based on a story by Stephen King, without any horror or supernatural content. A great classic movie.

Recently released on DVD, The Mist. Another Stephen King, Frank Darabount collaboration. Very basic, old fashioned scary movie. Examines the horror outside, and inside us all. Be very forewarned, extremely shocking ending. :o

best regards, lm

hm, i'd wondered if The Mist was any good. I'll have to look into it.


Sweetfudge

Born and raised in Portland, OR; Currently living in Provo, UT

Gluten-free since June 2006

Also living with Hypoglycemia since 1991

Dairy-free for good since summer 2008

Started IBS diet and probiotics at GI's recommendation - Fall 2008

Also avoiding: potatoes, beans, crucifers, popcorn, most red meat, coconut milk :(

Started eating a Paleo diet Spring 2011. Love it!

The grass is always greener where you water it.

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I'm reading the Nine Steps to Financial Freedom by Suze Orman... and I can't put it down! I had no idea that wills could be so expensive to carry out and how important revocable trusts are! She writes on a level that I can understand, and I have learned so much. I definitely recommend this book.

I'm also reading Marley and Me by John Grogan, and it's making me cry... I'm a big dog lover. It's non-fiction about a hilarious, sweet, and very mischievous Labrador Retriever.


diagnosed 8/05 through positive bloodwork & biopsy

gluten-free since then!

"Those who are willing to be vulnerable move among mysteries." Theodore Roethke

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Outlander by Diana Gabaldon. I took it with me for the 6 hour trip home on the airplane and could NOT put it down! And she has written several sequels, each as good as the first (a rarity in and of itself!). She truly is a master storyteller, playing with words in a subtle but funny way, great characters, and vivid backgrounds.

It's about Claire who travels through time to land in Scotland in the 1700s. There she meets (and is somewhat forced to marry) Jamie, a Scot who is amazing even by today's standards. They get caught up in political intrigues, war, family issues, and just life in the 1700s. It takes 76 pages to actually get going, but it's totally and completely worth it, because Gabaldon has to set the stage for the next (as of right now) 5 books to come. I can't say enough good things about this series. :)

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I'm a Dean Koontz freak. I love Watchers, One Door away from heaven, From the corner of his eye, the Odd Thomas books, the Frankenstein books, The good guy, Midnight, Fear nothing, Sieze the Night, lots of others.....

One good Stephen King book ( I don't always like him) is From a Buick 8.

I like Nora Roberts, I'll admit it. She's a fabulous storyteller, even if it is girl fiction. I think my favorite book of hers is Birthright.

I could go on all day, I'm a big reader. I'll spare you all that.

Gotta admit, I'm not too big on Jodi Picoult, I feel like she's telling the same story over and over. By the third book there's no surprises anymore.


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

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Right now I'm reading The Memory Keeper's Daughter.

This book was so good. I also read a good one, I believe it was called, My Sisters Keeper about a girls who was conceived to help her sister survive cancer through transplants and such. But, the best book I have read in years, was a book called, and I am probably spelling this wrong, Moloka'i. It was about when Hawaii was struck with Leporsy (sp?) years ago and they were sent to a Leporsy colony. The main character is a child who gets struck with the disease at about 7 and gets pulled away from her family and was sent to live at the colony. The story follows her life until she is old. This story was so profound that I felt as if I couldn't read another book for a while afterwards.

NIcole

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I'm a Dean Koontz freak. I love Watchers, One Door away from heaven, From the corner of his eye, the Odd Thomas books, the Frankenstein books, The good guy, Midnight, Fear nothing, Sieze the Night, lots of others.....

JNB1,

Agreed, he's got some classics. I haven't read any of his books in years, but read all of his earlier works. Midnight and Twilight Eyes will scare the hell out of you, and/or seriously creep you out. Lightening, The Bad Place, Watchers are all great.

May I recommend you try Robert R. McCammon. A little of Stephan King and Dean Koontz.

best regards, lm


gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

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Ah! Robert McCammon.....Swan Song and Gone South......

Brilliant works!

Bryce Courtenay has some fabulous reads in the historical fiction category. He often focuses on Australia and South Africa. :)


Emily

diagnosed type one diabetic 1973

diagnosed celiac winter 2005

diagnosed hypothyroid spring 2006

But healthy and happy! 253.gif

11 year-old Son had negative blood panel, but went on gluten-free diet of his own volition to see if his concentration would improve, his temper abate, and his energy level would increase. Miraculous response!

The great are great only because we are on our knees.

--Pierre Joseph Proudhon (1809-1865)

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The Omnivore's Dilemma (nonfiction)

A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson (and any of his travel books - very funny)

Hawaii by James Michener

The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver (or any of her books)

The series featuring medical examiner Kay Scarpetta by Patricia Cornwell (I started with The Body Farm, although that's not the first in the series - it will get you started)

A Dirty Job by Christopher Moore. I had this on my iPod and I would startle people by laughing out loud :lol: .

I second anything by Orson Scott Card. I just wish he would write the last Alvin Maker book! Start with Seventh Son.

Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond (nonfiction)


Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....

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How about the Time Travelers Wife? Has anyone else read that? I had trouble getting started with it because the concept is so strange but once I got started and finished I was so glad I read it.

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I JUST finished The Red Tent ---- AMAZING!!!! Could not put it down and stayed up until the middle of the night to finish it.

I also highly recommend and enjoy Russel Banks (Affliction, etc.) --- especially Rule of the Bone; The Poisonwood Bible - Kingsolver (I re-read it every year) --- and The History of Love (author escaping me right now) which has a loooong drawn out slow start, but is good in the end.

Enjoy!


Amy

Gluten Free since 4/05 - adult onset

Symptoms for 4+ years prior

Immediate family tests negative

No Known family members w/ celiac disease

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OMG my library list is getting so long!! :D


Sweetfudge

Born and raised in Portland, OR; Currently living in Provo, UT

Gluten-free since June 2006

Also living with Hypoglycemia since 1991

Dairy-free for good since summer 2008

Started IBS diet and probiotics at GI's recommendation - Fall 2008

Also avoiding: potatoes, beans, crucifers, popcorn, most red meat, coconut milk :(

Started eating a Paleo diet Spring 2011. Love it!

The grass is always greener where you water it.

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Ah! Robert McCammon.....Swan Song and Gone South......

Brilliant works!

Emily,

My first was Stinger, really got me hooked. Read several other selections, Night Boat, Wolf's Hour, (all the others I would call action horror) all very good. And then read Boy's Life. It amazed me how he could write something so different such as that, and Gone South which followed.

best regards, lm


gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

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I am in the middle of Wicked by Gregory Maguire

The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West

It's an allegorical fantasy - very well written. I haven't read anything this "dense" in years. (by dense I mean it's not "fluff" writing like Daniele Steele type is).

I am having a difficult time unraveling the allegory - it's political.

As for the Witch, her name is Elphaba and the story takes you from her birth to her meeting "Dorothy."


Husband has Celiac Disease and

Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -

The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis

Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,

most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as

being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."

Serious Depressive state ensued

Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003

Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.

Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle

Developed neuropathy in 2005

Now has lymphadema 2006It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

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Outlander by Diana Gabaldon. I took it with me for the 6 hour trip home on the airplane and could NOT put it down! And she has written several sequels, each as good as the first (a rarity in and of itself!). She truly is a master storyteller, playing with words in a subtle but funny way, great characters, and vivid backgrounds.

It's about Claire who travels through time to land in Scotland in the 1700s. There she meets (and is somewhat forced to marry) Jamie, a Scot who is amazing even by today's standards. They get caught up in political intrigues, war, family issues, and just life in the 1700s. It takes 76 pages to actually get going, but it's totally and completely worth it, because Gabaldon has to set the stage for the next (as of right now) 5 books to come. I can't say enough good things about this series. :)

Outlander is a fantastic book as is each book that follows! I recommend them to everyone :) I've read all 6 and listened to them on tape, just fantastic. I was actually planning on a re-read starting tomorrow!

I heard a rumor that Book 7 will be out by the end of the year.


"Write it on your heart that every day is the best day of the year". ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Maybe when we mention a book we should say if it's suitable or not for a teenager to read. I realize that some parents would probably like to know that as it's hard to know it before you purchase the book. There's no ratings (G,PG, PG-13, R) on books.....

It's funny in thinking about movie ratings...when I was a young teen "Franco Zefferelli's Romeo & Juliet" (Movie from about 1969) was rated "R". I wanted to see it but couldn't get in. Eventually I saw it on TV when I was about 30 years ago and I couldn't see what all the hub-bub was about. I felt it was suitable for a young teen to watch. Also, the same for Gone With The Wind.....it was considered a movie for adults only....so I read the book, which was 100 times better than the movie - if you can believe that --- and eventually saw the movie when I was about 20 and again I couldn't see what all the hub-bub was about - actually the "romance" part of it was a little silly and the worst that you saw was "OH MY" Scarlett briefly kissing a married Ashley & trying to get him to leave his wife and run away with her! Compare that naughtiness with today's stuff.

But anyway, it's difficult to know if a book is suitable for teen readers (I was reading in the adult portion of the library from when I was 12 - but I realize that some parents perhaps would frown on that).

I reason I bring this up is because I found Diana Gabaldon to be a little sexually graphic for my tastes - as well as Stephen King -- but that's just me.


Husband has Celiac Disease and

Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -

The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis

Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,

most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as

being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."

Serious Depressive state ensued

Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003

Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.

Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle

Developed neuropathy in 2005

Now has lymphadema 2006It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

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