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    Scott Adams

    Celiac Disease Screening in Risk Groups: A 14 Year Follow-up Study Focusing on Compliance and Quality of Life

    Scott Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2005;22(4):317-324.

    Celiac.com 09/14/2005 - In an effort to determine whether general screening for celiac disease should be conducted in high-risk groups, Finnish researchers conducted a 14 year follow-up study which focused on dietary compliance, quality of life, and bone mineral density in 53 consecutive screen-detected celiac disease patients who were diagnosed and treated around 14 years ago. The researchers assessed dietary compliance via an interview, a 4-day food record, and a blood antibody screening. Quality of life was measured via the Psychological General Well-Being and SF-36 questionnaires, while gastrointestinal symptoms were evaluated using the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale, and bone mineral density was measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. The researchers compared the results of these evaluations with those of 44 symptom-detected and treated celiac disease patients, 110 non-celiac disease subjects, and the general population.



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    The researchers found that 96% of screen-detected and 93% of symptom-detected celiac disease patients adhered to a strict or fairly strict gluten-free diet. In the screen-detected group quality of life and gastrointestinal symptoms were similar to that of the symptom-detected patients and non-celiac disease controls, and their bone mineral densities were similar to that of the general population.

    The researchers conclude that dietary compliance in long-term screen-detected patients was good, and quality of life and bone mineral densities were comparable to that of the non-celiac disease subjects and the general population. Based on these results active screening for celiac disease in risk groups is beneficial and in no way harmful.

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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