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  • Scott Adams

    What is the Treatment for Celiac Disease?

    Scott Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      A Gluten-Free Diet is Currently the Only Treatment for Celiac Disease


    Gluten-Free Expo. Image: CC BY 2.0--Towne Post Network
    Caption: Gluten-Free Expo. Image: CC BY 2.0--Towne Post Network

    Celiac.com 06/26/2020 - The only treatment for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet. 

    No Cure for Celiac Disease
    No prescription drug or home remedy can cure celiac disease. There is no operation or medical procedure that can cure celiac disease.



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    Gluten-Free Diet Key to Celiac Wellness
    However, people with celiac disease can live happy, healthy, normal lives by eliminating wheat rye and/or barley, and following a dedicated gluten-free diet.

    Avoid Unsafe Non-Gluten-Free Foods
    This means avoiding all products derived from wheat, rye, barley, oats, and a few other lesser-known grains. These foods and ingredients are unsafe and not-gluten-free. Here's our Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients).

    Eat Safe Gluten-Free Foods
    Eat only foods and ingredients that are safe and gluten-free. Here's our Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients)

    Vitamin Deficiencies Common in Celiacs
    People with celiac disease often suffer from vitamin deficiencies, especially when first diagnosed. Extra vitamins may be taken, if necessary, but the only way for a celiac to avoid damage to their intestinal villi and the associated symptoms, is by maintaining a gluten-free diet. The main vitamin deficiencies for people with celiac disease are: B vitamins, especially B12; Calcium; Carotene; Copper; Folic acid; Iron; Magnesium; Selenium; Vitamin A; Vitamin D; Vitamin E; Vitamin K; and Zinc.

    Edited by Scott Adams

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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