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FDA Approves First Fully Automated Gliadin Tests with Deamidated Peptides for Celiac Disease


Important new FDA approval of celiac disease testing.

Celiac.com 10/20/2010 - U.S. doctors and patients looking for accurate early diagnosis of celiac disease now have a state of the art celiac disease assay with a high level of sensitivity and specificity. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given 510(k) clearance for the first two fully automated gliadin tests featuring deamidated peptides for celiac disease.

Manufactured by Phadia US, the tests, EliA GliadinDP IgA and EliA GliadinDP IgG, are designed to be used in conjunct with other laboratory and clinical findings in the early diagnosis of celiac disease.

According to Gabi Gross, autoimmune franchise leader for Phadia US, "EliA GliadinDP IgA and EliA GliadinDP IgG will offer physicians who suspect a possible case of celiac disease, antibody tests with the lowest number of false positive results." This means less "unnecessary endoscopies and biopsies," she adds.

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EliA GliadinDP IgA and EliA GliadinDP IgG will offer antibody tests with the lowest number of false positive results for doctors who suspect a patient has celiac disease.

The assays are optional on Laboratory Systems Phadia 100Є and Phadia 250 instruments with features like quick turnaround, monthly calibration, onboard instrument dilution, and a discrete single-well, random-access, nonmicrotiter plate format.

Phadia also manufactures other approved CLIA moderately complex assays in the EliA autoimmune product line, including anticardiolipin IgG/IgM, anti-B2-glycoprotein 1 IgG/IgM, cyclic citrullinated peptide, tissue transglutaminase IgA/ IgG, gliadin IgA/IgG, dsDNA, antinuclear antibody screen, and ENA antibodies to the following antigens: Sm, U1RNP, RNP70, Ro, La, Scl-70, CENP, and Jo-1.

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4 Responses:

 
Jeff Kelly
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said this on
24 Oct 2010 7:59:19 PM PDT
Lowest number of false positives? I don't see how this beats the stool antibody tests developed by Kenneth Fine, MD of Dallas, Texas and his Enterolab.
There simply AREN'T any really good antibody tests besides his yet it seems. Physicians and patients need to recognize this and Physicians especially need to stop living in a fantasy world on accurate tests for Celiac.

 
April
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said this on
03 Nov 2010 3:58:13 AM PDT
Blood test are not accurate. Daughter diagnosed 4 years ago from a biopsy and then the blood test to confirm. I did a blood test and I was negative. My mother was negative as well. However, 3 years down the road, my mother had genetic testing done to see if she had the gene(s) for celiac. She does! She has both the genes. Resulting in ME having it 100%. My point here is blood test are so not accurate.

 
kiki
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said this on
23 Oct 2011 7:12:09 PM PDT
Your mother can have the gene and not develop the disease, and the same goes for you. The blood tests they do is to see if you in fact have the disease, not the gene.

 
Reeny
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said this on
29 Mar 2013 5:02:07 AM PDT
Test does not state whether person needs to be consuming gluten prior to testing. What's the truth of the matter? Where can I find solid facts? Thanks.




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^^^^^^ good info, tips and tricks^^^^^^^^^ yes, crumbs will make you sick. also, breathing flour/pancake mix, etc that is in the air because eventually, you're going to swallow some.

Hello I was diagnosed Dec 15 of last year and went totally gluten-free the next day. I actually got worse before I got better - it's a steep learning curve - but now, 4 1/2 months later I'm finally seeing improvement. Hang in there.

Called my GI doctor today to make sure he is going to look at my small intestine and do biopsy for Celiac for my EGD and he is. Thanks for the tip everyone about have to start eating gluten again. The office told me to break my gluten free diet and start eating gluten everyday until my EGD. Here's to being miserable again for a few weeks ???

I can completely relate! The horrible mental effects that I have been living with for years is the absolute worst side effect of eating gluten, HANDS DOWN. Worse than the endless tummy aches, worse than the constant diarrhea, worse than the week long migraines, worse than the daily fatigue and body pain.... I honestly though there was something seriously wrong with me and hated my life because of how I felt mentally. I always felt like I was drowning, not in control of my thoughts, trapped in some unexplained misery. My head was always so cloudy, and I was mad because I always felt so slow and stupid. I would feel so lethargic and sad and empty while at the same time be raging inside, wanting to rip out of my own skin. I was mean, terrible, would snap at the people closest to me for no good reason and just felt like I hated everyone and everything. Think of how crappy you feel when you have a terrible cold and flu - I felt that crappy, but mentally. Some days were really bad, some were mild. I always thought it was because I was getting a migraine, or because I had a migraine, or because I had just overcome a migraine, because I didn't sleep well, because....always a random reason to justify why we have all these weird unrelated symptoms before we get diagnosed. I'm happy to say that I have been gluten-free for about 2 months now and though I am not symptom free, the first thing that improved was my mood. I no longer feel foggy and miserable. For the first time in years, my head is clear, I can actually think, and I feel positive and like I am in control of what's going on in my head. I don't hate the world. I don't spend every day bawled up on the corner of the couch depressed and angry. The release of these horrible symptoms is enough to never make me want to cheat, no matter what I have to miss out on. So insane how a little minuscule amount of a stupid protein can wreck such havoc.

I wanted to collect some of the info on NCGI in one place so that visitors who test negative but may still have an issue with gluten can be directed there. I'll add to this post as I find new links, but feel free to add or contribute anything you think may be of use! Matt --- Useful links: An overview from Alessio Fasano, one of the world's leading researchers on celiac and gluten sensitivity: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvfTV57iPUY Umberto Volta, another leading researcher in the field gives some of the latest findings about NCGI: Presentation slides from Dr Volta's visit to Coeliac UK - NCGS about halfway through A scholarly overview from celiac disease magazine: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Knut_Lundin/publication/232528784_Non-celiac_Gluten_Sensitivity/links/09e415098bbe37c05b000000.pdf A good overview from a sceptical but fair perspective: https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/a-balanced-look-at-gluten-sensitivity/ Another overview: https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity-2/ University of Chicago's excellent celiac site's take: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/category/faq-non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity/ A compelling account in the British Medical Journal from an NCGI patient: http://www.bmj.com/content/345/bmj.e7982 Here's some positive news about a potential new test: http://www.medicaldaily.com/non-celiac-gluten-insensitivity-blood-test-392850 NCGI in children: NCGI and auto immune study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26026392 Also consider: Fodmaps: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/lsm/research/divisions/dns/projects/fodmaps/faq.aspx This Monash study: http://fodmapmonash.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/the-truth-behind-non-celiac-gluten.html suggested some who think they're reacting to gluten should actually be reducing fodmaps Sibo: http://www.webmd.boots.com/digestive-disorders/small-intestinal-bacteria-sibo