No popular authors found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter

Categories

No categories found.







Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Higher-Than-Normal Thyroxine Doses Offer a Clue to Celiac Disease

Celiac.com 03/26/2012 - People with thyroiditis and untreated celiac disease may suffer from reduced thyroid-stimulating hormone levels, a new study has found. Those people may require supplemental doses of thyroxine to normalize their thyroid-stimulating hormone levels.

That study, which appears in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, also indicates that following a gluten-free diet seems to require less thyroxine to push thyroid hormone back toward normal levels.

Photo: CC - sanofi pasteurMore and more, people diagnosed with celiac disease, show atypical symptoms, many without the classic gastrointestinal complaints that traditionally characterized celiac disease.

The study team notes that the need for higher thyroxine doses may offer a clue to such atypical celiac disease.

Leader of the study, endocrinologist Dr. Marco Centanni, of Sapienza University of Rome, in Italy, encourages doctors to consider the "possibility of the presence of other occult autoimmune disorders…every time they see a patient with autoimmune thyroiditis."

Dr. Centanni adds that doctors should consider malabsorption, and possible celiac disease, whenever standard thyroxine doses fail to reduce thyroid-stimulating hormone levels to under 2.5mU/L. For Dr. Centanni, an individually-tailored dose of thyroxine that fails to hit the therapeutic target is a powerful "tool to unveil occult gastrointestinal disorders."

Ads by Google:

Dr. Centanni and his team analyzed replacement T4 doses in 35 hypothyroid patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and atypical celiac disease. They also looked at 68 patients with Hashimoto's alone.

After an about five months of thyroxine doses averaging 1.31 mcg/kg/day, the 68 patients without celiac disease reached target serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels of a median of 1.02 mU/L.

After receiving similar thyroxine doses over a similar span of time, the 35 patients with celiac disease showed much higher hormone levels, averaging 4.20 mU/l, and just a single patient had reached the target level.

The team then encouraged patients with celiac disease to adopt a gluten-free diet, and found 21 willing patients.

When they measured those 21 patients again after an average of 11 months, they found that the patients had returned to target serum hormone levels on a average thyroxine dose of 1.32 mcg/kg/day, which is similar to the dose originally used in the non-celiacs.

To get normal target serum hormone levels in the 14 celiac patients who did not comply with the gluten-free diet, the team had to increase the dosage substantially.

From these results, the researchers conclude that malabsorption of thyroxine may offer an as yet undiscovered way detect celiac disease in certain cases.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Yes, you can eat bananas but only on Sunday. Kidding. Peter has it right. Most fruits, veggies and meats are naturally gluten-free. The problem for celiacs are grains including wheat, rye, barley, and oats (only some celiacs react to oats). Any food though can be contaminated with thos...

Bananas are naturally gluten-free. Fruits do not contain gluten, nor do vegetables. Gluten is found in grain, and you won't likely find that in the produce department. Enjoy, and welcome aboard.

I'm new to this site. Had one test come back + and just had another one done yesterday. Just wondering are Celiac able to eat bananas.

?Less than 7 percent of Americans have celiac disease or another condition that causes gluten sensitivity, which can lead to severe digestive issues,? said ... If gluten-free foods are made with rice flour, as many are, research shows people consuming them may ingest worrisome amounts of arsenic ...

That this not the same thing at all! It?s a rinse in the laundry. Even if it didn?t rinse all the way out, you aren?t trailing flour around the house. There is no reason for people to over react and make life harder. Most of us don?t want to live like that! If this sort of thing w...