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New Data Links RGS1 and IL12A Polymorphisms with Celiac Disease Risk

Celiac.com 04/28/2016 - The development of celiac disease has been tied to polymorphisms in the regulator of G-protein signaling 1 (RGS1) and interleukin-12 A (IL12A) genes, but existing data are unclear and contradictory.

Image: CC--Mehmet PinarciA research team recently set out to examine the associations of two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs2816316 in RGS1 and rs17810546 in IL12A) with celiac disease risk using meta-analysis.

The research team included Cong-Cong Guo, Man Wang, Feng-Di Cao, Wei-Huang Huang, Di Xiao, Xing-Guang Ye, Mei-Ling Ou, Na Zhang, Bao-Huan Zhang, Yang Liu, Guang Yang, and Chun-Xia Jing.

They are variously affiliate with the Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou, the Department of Stomatology of the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, the Department of Parasitology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou, and the Key Laboratory of Environmental Exposure and Health in Guangzhou, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China.

The team began by searching PubMed and Web of Science for RGS1 rs2816316 and IL12A rs17810546 with celiac disease risk. They then estimated the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of each SNP. They retrieved a total of seven studies, and used Stata 12.0 to perform statistical analyses.

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The available data indicated the minor allele C of rs2816316 was negatively associated with celiac disease (C vs. A: OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.74–0.80), while they did find a positive association for the minor allele G of rs17810546 (G vs. A: OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.31–1.43).

They found that the co-dominant model of genotype effect confirmed the significant associations between RGS1 rs2816316/IL12A rs17810546 and celiac disease. They found no evidence of any publication bias.

The team's meta-analysis indicates a connection between RGS1 and IL12A and celiac disease, and provides a strong support for deeper study into the roles of RGS1 and IL12A in the development of celiac disease.

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