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Mast Cells Tied to Onset and Progression of Celiac Disease

Mast cells are a major driver in the onset and progression of celiac disease.


Image: CC--zooey

Celiac.com 05/18/2017 - Researchers understand pretty well that celiac disease is driven in part by an accumulation of immune cells in the duodenal mucosa as a consequence of both adaptive and innate immune responses to undigested gliadin peptides.

Mast cells are innate immune cells that produce a majority of co-stimulatory signals and inflammatory mediators in the intestinal mucosa. A team of researchers recently set out to evaluate the role of mast cells in the development of celiac disease.

The research team included Barbara Frossi, PhD, Claudio Tripodo, MD, Carla Guarnotta, PhD, Antonio Carroccio, MD, Marco De Carli, MD, Stefano De Carli, MD, Marco Marino, MD, Antonino Calabrò, MD, and Carlo E. Pucillo, MD.

They are variously affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy at the University Hospital of Udine in Udine, Italy; the Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Udine, Italy; the Second Unit of Internal Medicine, University of Udine, Udine, Italy; the Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences “Mario Serio,” University Hospital of Florence, Florence, Italy; the Tuscany Referral Center for Adult Coeliac Disease, AOU Careggi, Florence, Italy; the Department of Health Science, University Hospital of Palermo in Palermo, Italy; and the Department of Internal Medicine and Specialist at the University Hospital of Palermo in Palermo, Italy.

For their study, the research team scored intestinal biopsy results from celiac patients according to Marsh classification, and characterized those results for leukocyte infiltration and MC distribution. They also characterized mast cell reactivity to gliadin and its peptides via in vitro assays.

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The team found that infiltrating mast cells reflected the severity of mucosal damage, and their numbers were increased in patients with higher Marsh scores. They noted that mast cells responded directly to non-immunodominant gliadin fragments by releasing pro-inflammatory mediators.

Their immunohistochemical analysis of infiltrating mast cells, along with the effects of gliadin peptides on intestinal mast cells, indicates that patients in with advanced celiac disease face an increase in pro-inflammatory mast cell function. This result was also tied to increased neutrophil accumulation, the prevalence of M1 macrophages, and the severity of tissue damage.

This study clearly describes the progressive stages of celiac disease, and shows that mast cells are a prominent feature of the inflammatory process.

These results show that mast cells are associated with the onset and progression of celiac disease, and that the view of celiac disease should be revised to account for the contribution of mast cells in the onset and progression of the disease; and in the development any new celiac treatments.

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1 Response:

 
sifahim
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said this on
20 May 2017 11:48:20 PM PDT
There have lots of information. Which is really helpful.




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Welcome to the forum. Be sure to browse through the DH section for advice and tips. Glad your wife is gluten free. My hubby was gluten free some 12 years before my diagnosis. Sure makes it a bit easier!

As I am sitting here, I am wearing a retainer. Yep, had a tooth extracted a few months ago. To keep the space open for a future transplant, my dentist ordered a retainer. I read that PUB MED study. One kid. Not very scientific at all! Gluten Free Watchdog agrees that the odds of this kid being glutened by her retainer is slim and none. Like my PCV sprinklers lines, retainers probably do not last a lifetime. Ask your dentist how long they should last. No one wants to eat plastic!

I've had them about six or seven times at several different Starbucks locations. My sister has, also. Neither one of us have had any signs of getting glutened. They are served in a parchment paper bag that should be handed to you straight from the oven sealed. I've heard many internet complaints about the bags being dusty, too many ingredients, unhealthy, etc., but honestly, they are pretty darned tasty! And, when you are traveling and hungry, they are even tastier. They sell out quickly at most Starbucks, but I've been able to purchase one as late at 6 p.m.

I wish they didn't use " gluten" as a headline. People abuse and starve children for a variety of " reasons". gluten-free was just one they picked, it could have been paleo or kosher or whatever...

Ugh! This again..... first ...it was one person...not a study... just someone's speculation. if I am remembering correctly - no one actually tested the retainer. The kid was a 12-16 yr old an drew could have gotten caught eating gluten, etc, etc, etc. And then those internet folks who love to spread " bad news" or use that stuff to further their purpose, jumped on it. And then let's talk to a chemist or plastic scientist - if the plastic leaches our actual proteins, like gluten, wouldn't the plastic piece break down after a while? welcome to the world of Celiac internet myths. adding - none of the Celiac Centers, Associations, etc have warned people not to use a retainers.