Celiac.com 12/06/2007 - About one person or so in every hundred has celiac disease, which means they suffer from a variety of associated symptoms along with intestinal damage and associated conditions. Research shows a connection between celiac disease and a variety of hepatic disorders. People with celiac disease have a higher instance of certain disorders of the liver. One of the most commonly presented liver problems among celiac patients is isolated hypertransaminasemia with non-specific histologic changes.

Following a gluten-free diet usually returns the liver enzymes and histologic function to their normal state. People with celiac disease can also have unrelated liver conditions, such as primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, or primary sclerosing cholangitis.

Most people don’t know much, if anything about celiac disease. Even most people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance face a long learning curve to get up to speed on all of the related issues that concern them. Many people with celiac disease understand that it is a condition in which an auto-immune mediated reaction to the presence of gluten from wheat, rye or barley cause damage to the lining of the intestine, which, if left untreated exposes them to greater risks of certain types of cancer, along with diabetes, and many other conditions.

Even though it is well known among physicians that celiac disease is associated with a variety of other conditions, until recently, those associated with