Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2005; 21 (5): 515-518.

Celiac.com 06/08/2005 – Australian researchers searched Medline and other references for cases of celiac disease and liver disease from 1966 to 2003. They found six studies that reported liver biochemistry in 591 celiac disease patients—out of which a full 248 had abnormal results—the most common of which being elevated transaminases. In 115 of 130 patients with elevated transaminases a gluten-free diet returned the levels to normal.

The researchers found a much greater association of primary biliary cirrhosis and advanced liver disease in those with celiac disease than expected, and conclude that abnormal liver biochemistry is frequent in untreated celiac disease—and those with it should undergo tissue transglutaminase screening for celiac disease—which could lead to a proper diagnosis in many cases. In rare cases celiac-induced hepatitis may progress to end-stage liver disease.

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