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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity

Nih Conference Live Online For 3 Days!

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NIH Conference on Celiac Disease in Bethesda, MD - begins TODAY!

You can watch via webcast!

Watch on-line or attend in person the NIH Celiac Consensus Conference

sponsored by the NIH on June 28-30 at the Natcher Conference Center in

Bethesda, MD. Details on how to watch on-line at the NIH videocast

website and the program are listed below. Experts in celiac disease including

Cynthia Kupper, RD, Shelley Case, RD and 18 MD's from the US, Canada

and Europe will be presenting at this historic conference. The


summmaries will be available at the NIH web site after the conference

and a special supplement in the J of Gastroenterology with in-depth

articles from each speaker will be published in the fall. Here is the

link for more information :

This link also give the NLM bibliography on celiac disease which contains hundreds

of articles and is 207 pages!

The conference will address the following key questions:

1. How is celiac disease diagnosed?

2. How prevalent is celiac disease?

3. What are the manifestations and long-term consequences of celiac


4. Who should be tested for celiac disease?

5. What is the management of celiac disease?

6. What are the recommendations for future research on celiac


and related conditions?

During the first day and part of the second day of the conference,

experts will present the latest research findings in celiac disease to

the independent consensus panel. After weighing all of the scientific

evidence, the panel will prepare its statement addressing the


listed above. The panel will present its draft statement to the public

for comment at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, June 30. Following this public

comment session, and a subsequent executive session to weigh the input

provided, the panel will hold a news conference at 2:00 p.m. to take

questions from the media.

Preliminary Agenda for the Celiac Consensus Conference happening NOW

in Bethesda, Maryland. You can view it live via webcast. See below

for details on how to do so:

Monday, June 28, 2004

8:30 a.m. Opening Remarks

Allen M. Spiegel, M.D. Director

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

National Institutes of Health

8:40 a.m. Charge to the Panel

Susan Rossi, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Deputy Director

Office of Medical Applications of Research, Office of the Director

National Institutes of Health

8:50 a.m. Conference Overview and Panel Activities

Charles Elson, M.D.

Panel and Conference Chairperson

Professor of Medicine and Microbiology

Vice Chair for Research, Department of Medicine

University of Alabama at Birmingham

I. How Is Celiac Disease Diagnosed?

9 a.m. Overview and Pathogenesis of Celiac Disease

Martin F. Kagnoff, M.D. Professor of Medicine

Cancer Biology Program

University of California at San Diego

9:20 a.m. The Pathology of Celiac Disease

Paul J. Ciclitira


The Rayne Institute

St. Thomas' Hospital

United Kingdom

9:40 a.m. What Are the Sensitivity and Specificity of

Serological Tests for Celiac Disease? Do Sensitivity and Specificity

Vary in Different Populations?

Ivor Hill, M.D.

Professor of Pediatrics

Wake Forest University School of Medicine

10 a.m. Discussion

10:30 a.m. Clinical Algorithm in Celiac Disease

Ciaran P. Kelly, M.D.

Herrman L. Blumgart Firm Chief

Director, Gastroenterology Fellowship Training

Associate Professor Medicine

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Harvard Medical School

10:50 a.m. Genetic Testing: Who Should Do the Testing and What

Is the Role of Genetic Testing in the Setting of Celiac Disease?

George Eisenbarth, M.D

Executive Director

Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes

University of Colorado Health Sciences Center

11:10 a.m. Evidence-Based Practice Center Presentation: Summary

of the Evidence

EPC Speaker TBA

University of Ottawa

11: 30 a.m. Discussion

12 p.m. Lunch

II. How Prevalent Is Celiac Disease?

1 p.m. Epidemiology of Celiac Disease: What Are the Prevalence,

Incidence, and Progression of Celiac Disease?

Marian J. Rewers, M.D., Ph.D.


Clinical Director

Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes

University of Colorado Health Sciences Center

1:20 p.m. What Are the Prevalence and Incidence of Celiac Disease in

High-Risk Populations: Patients With an Affected Member, Type 1

Diabetes, Iron Deficiency Anemia, and Osteoporosis?

Joseph A. Murray, M.D.

Professor of Medicine

Mayo Clinic

1:40 p.m. Evidence-Based Practice Center Presentation

EPC Speaker TBA

University of Ottawa

2 p.m. Discussion

III. What Are the Manifestations and Long-Term Consequences of Celiac


2:30 p.m. Clinical Presentation of Celiac Disease in the Pediatric


Alessio Fasano, M.D.

Professor of Pediatrics, Medicine, and Physiology

Director, Mucosal Biology Research Center

Center for Celiac Research

University of Maryland School of Medicine

2:50 p.m. The Many Faces of Celiac Disease: Clinical Presentation of

Celiac Disease in the Adult Population

Peter Green, M.D.

Clinical Professor of Medicine

Division of Digestive and Liver Disease

Columbia University

3:10 p.m. Association of Celiac Disease and Gastrointestinal

Lymphomas and Other Cancers

Carlo Catassi, M.D., M.P.H.

Co-Medical Director

Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

Center for Celiac Research

University of Maryland School of Medicine

3:30 p.m. Skin Manifestations of Celiac Disease

John Zone

Chairman and Professor of Dermatology

University of Utah Health Sciences Center

3:50 p.m. Neurological/Psychological Presentation of Celiac Disease:

Ataxia, Depression, Neuropathy, Seizures, and Autism

Khalafalla Bushara, M.D. Department of Neurology

University of Minnesota

4:10 p.m. Discussion

5 p.m. Adjournment

Tuesday, June 29, 2004

IV. Who Should Be Tested for Celiac Disease?

8:30 a.m. Should Children Be Screened for Celiac Disease? Is There

Evidence To Support the Strategy of Screening All Children?

Edward Hoffenberg, M.D.

Associate Professor of Pediatrics

Director, Center for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Children's Hospital Denver

University of Colorado School of Medicine

8:50 a.m. Should Adults Be Screened for Celiac Disease?

What Are the Benefits and Harms of Screening?

Pekka Collin, M.D., Ph.D.

Medical School

University of Tampere


9:10 a.m. Evidence-Based Practice Center Presentation

Speaker TBA

University of Ottawa

9:30 a.m. Discussion

V. What Is the Management of Celiac Disease?

10 a.m. Dietary Guidelines for Celiac Disease and Implementation

Cynthia Kupper, R.D., C.D.

Executive Director

Gluten Intolerance Group

10:20 a.m. How To Educate Patients Effectively and Provide Resources:

Gluten-Free Diets

Shelley Case, R.D.

Case Nutrition Consulting

10:40 a.m. The Followup of Patients With Celiac Disease-Achieving

Compliance With Treatment

Michelle Pietzak, M.D.

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics

University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine

11 a.m. Discussion

11:30 a.m. Adjournment

Wednesday, June 30, 2004

9 a.m. Presentation of the Consensus Statement

9:30 a.m. Public Discussion

11 a.m. Panel Meets in Executive Session

2 p.m. Press Conference

3 p.m. Adjournment

Rev. 3/12/04 is where you can find the live video



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During the NIH Conference question session, one gentelman asked about eczema and celiac disease. The panel of experts said that about 5% of patients who have eczema, dermatitis, atopic dermatitis have those conditions linked to celiac disease, it is commonly thought that only dermatitis heptaformis is the only skin condition linked to celiac.

I personally was diagnosed with atopic dermatitis at age 3, and went undiagnosed for another 21 years!! <_<

They also talked about a study on smoking, they had 3 studies and 2 of the studies showed that smoking prevented celiac disease from rearing it's ugly head. Interesting!



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That is interesting since I quit smoking about 3 years ago and I have been gradually getting sicker for the last year and a half. I tell you though, I would much rather have Celiac than die from cancer or empysema like my father and in-laws did.


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I just thought I would share this link with you so that you can read

the NIH consensus development Conference statement. It is basically a

conclusion and statement from the last three days of the conference.

It talks about things that need to be changed, research etc. It is

worth the read. It is 21 pages long.

You need adobe acrobat to read this link.

-Jessica :rolleyes:


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Everybody should read this stuff. The NIH conference could be the biggest and best thing for us ever. Many, many more medical people will learn more about celiac disease because of this. And if more people are diagnosed as a result, then the commercial world will pay more attention to our needs.



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You can also check the front page of and scroll down to the bottom of the page to see severeal news stories that have come about today because of the NIH conference. Over 200 newspapers across the US carried stories about celiac today. THANK YOU NIH for creating awareness!!!

-Jessica :rolleyes:


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