Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Dermatitis Herpetiformis
0

6 posts in this topic

hi, New to the message board. I was just disgnosed with celiac/DH so I get the sores instead of being sick like most of the people on this board. I still have a lot of questions-like can I eat chocolate? What about modified food starch? bread is the hardest for me even though I am not a big bread eater-can I have Millet bread? Anyone else with GH-if you can give me any guidance it would be most appreciated. Thank you-Moe

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Hi.

I am still pretty new to this but you can eat a lot of brands of chocolate, you just need to be careful. People like Nestle and Cadburys list on the products and websites if they contain things like gluten, soy, nuts etc.

Another thing you need to be careful of is snack sized chocolate. I have found a few times the normal version is fine but a snack size is not.

Check out:

http://www.celiac.com/cgi-bin/webc.cgi/st_...-33104374558.f1

I have been gluten free for a few months and to be honest it is a pain in the ass but once you get used to it, it isn't too hard barring eating out.

The one thing I would suggest to you is research lots. You would be amazed at the things which contain gluten. Things which caught me out in the beginning were things like soda gun coke in certain bars (syrup contained wheat), sausages, chips coated in flour to stop them sticking together and even a wooden spoon which had previously been used for regular pasta as it is porous.

I don't bother with gluten-free bread at all. 95% of it tastes like crap and at the end of the day nothing will truly replace bread. I buy 100% corn crackers or corn wraps to make a kind of sandwich and it is great.

Companies often list what products have gluten in them on their websites or a quick call to them confirms it.

If I am not 100% sure it is gluten free I don't eat it. My diet started off quite basic and is now becoming half decent.

I would however kill for a bacon sandwich in white bread with brown sauce :angry:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with the last comment about bread! Most of it isn't worth eating. I know people with bread makers have luck making gluten-free bread, though. The best baked goods I have found are frozen tapioca-based products from a Canadian company called Kinnikinick. When thawed, it has a texture similar to "real" bread. A lot of chocolates are gluten-free. Hersheys is. I eat Hersheys kisses and M&m's when I need a treat. Research ingredients on line. The modified food starch question is tricky. It is generally corn starch, but not always. Some companies, like Kraft, promise to say if the source of the starch is wheat. Others don't, so I stay away from that ingredient unless I can verify the source. For example, Jello Pudding said their Modified Food starch is corn starch when I called. Once you are used to reading labels, things will be easier. Another great resource I just discovered is the magazine "Living Without". It has lots of information about food intolerances. Good Luck

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have DH and the gluten-free diet has worked wonders...if you stick to it faithfully. Many of the scars are now even beginning to fade. Just one mistake, though, and here come those itchy ugly sores again. Expect it to take a year or more to get it fully under control.

I agree with the earlier post. Research, research, research. Keep a notebook. A great resource for going to the grocery store is the gluten free commercial guide available from csaceliacs.org. I have added extra tabs to keep notes on store brands and medications. That book goes everywhere we go.

You will need to become your own best friend and research assistant if you want to do this to its best. It is tough for the first few months, but then you just know what to pick up at the store, double check every few months to be sure nothing has changed, and then go on with life.

Be sure to check carefully for anything that comes into contact with your skin. That includes soaps, lotions, shampoos, make up, household cleaners, etc. One of the best sources for household cleaners I have found is Shaklee. I used to be a distributor but am not any longer. When my sores are at their worst, I can put a capful of basic H into my bathwater and soak...ah the bubbles and what a change in the look and feel of the sores. Their dishwashing liquid, germicide, etc. all do not cause any reaction. We use All Free and Clear for clothes. The Shaklee was too expensive for a family our size. You may have to change for the whole family if your stuff is washed in the same sink or laundry (at least initially). You may also find as we did that the longer we are gluten-free, the fewer things trigger a problem. Even gluten-free stuff could be a problem at first if it was not really mild.

Just think how good you are going to feel and how beautiful your skin will be once you have done this for a while.

Donna

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh yes, I forgot. Yes you can have bread made from millet, quinoa, amaranth, teff, bean flours, rice, etc. as long as they do not also contain wheat, rye, barley, or oats. The ones with the best texture are based in the bean flours but have the other flours for flavor. There are some pretty good recipes out there. Keep looking.

Good luck!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Actually, the gluten-free bread machine mix from Bob's Red Mill is delicious!

My wife has used several products from there to make biscuits, doughnuts, and such, and other than being more dense than regular bread, it is really good.

I have also run across several pre-packaged meals that you prepare at home with noodles and spices that are gluten-free according to the ingredients on the package. It actually states "GLUTEN-FREE" at the end of the list. These items are Thai Kitchen, and several of them are really great.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,091
    • Total Posts
      920,311
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Thanks for posting this Adrien, it's a great list and I and others will appreciate the effort and the thought behind it. I loved my time in Malaysia and I'm glad I sampled all the food I could whilst I was still on an unrestricted diet. The good thing is that, like you say, some of the nice Malay foods are still ok. As a backpacker I survived on a lot of nasi goreng and laksa, nice to think if I return there I could still do the same Terima kasih!
    • I have posted on here before. DQ2, brother with celiac, DGP iGA was the only mildly elevated test. Was gluten-free so did 6 week challenge last winter. Negative biopsy. I am gluten-free now but do go out to eat. Prior to the challenge my health was good. Since then I have: Chest pain, pain between shoulder blades, periods of shortness of breath, heart palpitations, one instance of a heart arrythmia episode, neck is tender to touch on one side (they kept saying sinuses or TMJ which my dentist vetoed) ear ache, bowels never sink. Numbness and tingling. Blood pressure variations. Could be doing chores and feel dizzy and it might be 84/52.  not super low, but not typical for me if I'm running around the house.While other days I am mildly hypertensive. Recently lost 5 lbs in 8 days without trying. Recently electrolytes were low, alkaline phosphatese was low. Ferritin started dropping so started liquid iron 2-3 times per day 4 months ago. Primary watching that, I am not anemic but we are nowhere near iron overload either.  GI doc was a dick. Did not even know DGP replaced older tests and he was very condescending When I begged him for help recently and told me to get a second opinion which is exactly what I plan on doing.  I now have pain in my upper GI area. It is tender to touch. I had my gallbladder out in 97 along with a stone and infection in my bile duct. It hurts in this area. Pancreatic enzymes look fine, liver enzymes fine. Pancreatic ultrasound fine. I will now be doing a EUS Soon to look at bile duct, pancreas and liver.   so a typical day for me is that I might feel fine for a while and then suddenly feel like I'm going to pass out. really dizzy, numbness in odd places, like my body has been hijacked. I will typically eat a bunch of food something high protein and in about an hour or so I start to feel better. However, then my upper stomach starts to hurt in place of the passing out feeling. blood sugars are also normal. After getting the " it must be panic attacks" and condescending looks a million times my primary finally ordered an ultrasound of my sore neck and there is an abnormality in my thyroid which she says looks like possibly Hashti's. Except for one time, all my serum TSH tests were normal. We have more blood work on Monday. As I have not put on any weight and there are other symptoms that are closer to Graves.  Has anyone else had any thyroid issues that followed doing a gluten challenge?  where is your stomach pain? Do you have it above or below your belly button? Mine feels like it's in the pancreas area, like 2-3 inches above the belly button and when I push on it it's tender, but not all the time. sometimes i feel it in my back. 
    • Thanks for sharing with me.  I really appreciate it.  Honestly, after a glutening last summer (still do not know what glutened me), I did not eat out for a year!  The risk was too great as my healing time took 3 months (for symptoms to subside) and six months to regain lost weight.  Our recent vacation to Europe was worth the risk  as we traveled with our entire extended family, but we were extra cautious and ate only at celiac-approved places.  Otherwise, we "dined" at markets or ate the food we brought from home.  Thankfully, we did not get glutened (at least we don't think so!)  
    • I do not struggle with this and I was brought up the same way as you. I don't struggle because for many years off & on we didn't have a bathtub, only showers as well as this being therapy or medicinal for the skin - heck even for the muscles as I age. I figure I've earned my right to luxuriate or medicate with baths any time I've a mind to. My husband saw just how bad my dh got & NEVER begrudges me a nice long soak in the big soaking tub we now have.
    • Hi, No, I do not have celiac  disease. I have an ankylosing spondylitis which is an auto-immune disease provoking an inflammation of the joints. Under the advice and supervision of my doctor and the professor at the hospital I follow a gluten free & casein free diet, which is extremely successful in preventing inflammatory events. And I've been doing so, strictly, for more than 6 years. So I'm not Celiac, but I can tell you that I react strongly every time I take gluten even in small amounts. Even soya sauce, which according to this website has an almost zero dose of gluten, is a lot too much for me. Nevertheless I allow myself to eat food which has been processed in a factory which processes gluten. To conclude, I would say that when you are travelling, especially in a country where celiac disease is scarcely known, you should be twice as careful as when you're going out at home. In the end you can never guarantee that the cook has cleaned his pan after using soya sauce and so on... You can only bet
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,121
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Sambud
    Joined