Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter
  • Join Our Community!

    Ask us a question in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Scott Adams

    22 Diseases or Conditions that Require Celiac Disease Screening

    Scott Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      People with any of the following conditions should be tested or screened for celiac disease.


    Image: CC BY-ND 2.0--Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR)
    Caption: Image: CC BY-ND 2.0--Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR)

    Celiac.com 08/21/2020 - So who, exactly, should be screened for celiac disease? The guidelines and parameters for who and when to test for celiac disease change as new data becomes available. Based on recent study data, and recommendations by the three major celiac disease organizations, many doctors advise celiac screening for patients with any of the following twenty-two conditions or diseases:

    Anemia

    Unexplained iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. A 2014 study showed that celiac disease is common in people with unexplained anemia. The study team recommends celiac screening for anyone with unexplained iron-deficient anemia, while the The U.K. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommend celiac screening for anyone with unexplained vitamin B-12 or folate deficiency.

    Aphthous stomatitis



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    People with severe or persistent mouth ulcers (canker sores) should get screened for celiac disease. A 2020 study confirms that doctors should consider celiac disease in patients with severe or recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Autism

    People with autism have celiac disease at rates almost 20 times higher than in those without autism, reported lead investigator Daniel Karb, MD, a second-year resident at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland. As such, many doctors now recommend celiac screening for people with autism.

    Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    The The U.K. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommends celiac screening for anyone with thyroid disease

    Dental Enamel Defects

    Certain types of dental enamel defects can be strong indicators of celiac disease. A 2018 study shows that non-specific tooth wear and enamel defects can be strong indications of celiac disease.

    Dermatitis Herpetiformis (DH)

    People with dermatitis herpetiformis, aka DH, or Duhring’s disease, suffer from a herpes-like rash. About 10% to 15% of people with celiac disease have DH.  Anyone with DH should be checked for celiac disease. Most people with DH see major improvements on a gluten-free diet.

    Failure to Thrive and Persistent Diarrhea in Children

    The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) and The American College of Gastroenterology recommends celiac screening for children with failure to thrive, especially with persistent diarrhea.

    Unexplained Fatigue

    Unexplained fatigue. People with persistent unexplained fatigue should consider screening for celiac disease, according to the U.K. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.

    GERD

    Some studies show no link between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) and celiac disease. A 2015 study showed that celiac disease not a big factor in gastro-esophageal reflux disease. But a 2020 study showed that non-celiac gluten sensitivity is common in patients with refractory functional dyspepsia. Many doctors recommend celiac disease screening for patients with GERD

    High Transaminase Levels

    High transaminase levels can be an indication of liver damage, heart damage, and are common in people with celiac disease. 

    Down syndrome

    A 2020 study shows that people with Down syndrome have celiac disease at up to twenty times the rate of the general population. Celiac disease screening is important for anyone with Down syndrome.

    IgA Deficiency

    The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition recommends testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic children who have conditions associated with celiac disease, including selective IgA deficiency.

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Adults

    Adults with irritable bowel syndrome should be screened for celiac disease, according to the The U.K. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.

    Persistent Unexplained Elevated Liver Enzymes

    The U.K. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommends celiac screening for people with persistently elevated liver enzymes with unknown cause.

    Recurrent Miscarriages

    The U.K. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommends celiac screening for women who experience recurrent miscarriages.

    Immediate Relatives of Anyone with Celiac Disease

    First-degree relatives (mother, father, brother, sister, son, daughter) of anyone with celiac disease should get a celiac screen, according to Mayo Clinic.

    Short Stature

    A 2020 study shows that biopsy confirmed celiac disease affects about 1 in 14 patients with all‐cause short stature, and 1 in 9 patients with idiopathic short stature. Based on these results, doctors are recommending screening all patients with short stature should be screened for celiac disease.

    Thyroiditis

    Thyroiditis is an auto-immune condition associated with celiac disease. The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) recommends celiac disease screening in children who have thyroiditis.

    Turner syndrome

    Turner syndrome is associated with celiac disease. The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) recommends celiac disease screening in children who have Turner syndrome.
    celiac.com/articles.html/who-should-get-screened-for-celiac-disease-r5201/

    Type 1 diabetes

    More than 20% of people with Type 1 diabetes have celiac disease. The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) recommends celiac disease screening in children who have Type 1 diabetes.

    Unexplained Infertility

    Women with infertility face higher rates of celiac disease. Many doctors do not screen for celiac disease in these women. However, for women experiencing unexplained infertility, especially repeatedly, a celiac disease screen is probably a good idea.

    Unexplained Neuropathy

    Patients with unexplained neuropathy, or small fiber neuropathy should be screened for celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity, according to researchers.

    Unexplained Weight Loss

    According to the U.K. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, people who suffer from unexplained weight loss should be screened for celiac disease.

    Consider Celiac Screening for These Common Physical Complaints

    People with any of the ten most common complaints of celiac patients, or any of the below conditions that are associated with celiac disease, along with any obvious signs of celiac disease, including persistent diarrhea or stomach upset, should consider celiac screening. These include:

    • Anemia
    • Alternating bowel habit
    • Bloating
    • Constipation
    • Cryptogenic hypertransaminasemia
    • Diarrhea
    • Gastroesophageal reflux disease
    • Osteopenia/Osteoporosis
    • Recurrent miscarriages
    • Unexplained Infertility

    Other Conditions Associated with Celiac Disease

    The following conditions are not included in the official celiac screening recommendations by the above organizations. However, anyone with any of the following conditions, along with any obvious signs of celiac disease, including persistent diarrhea or stomach upset, should consider celiac screening. These include:

    • Addisons Disease
    • Alopecia
    • Anxiety and Depression
    • Ataxia
    • Attention Deficit Disorder/ADHD
    • Autism
    • Autoimmune Hepatitis / Chronic Active Hepatitis
    • Bird Fanciers Lung
    • Brain White-Matter Lesions
    • Cerebellar Atrophy
    • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (myalgic encephalomyelitis or ME, PVS, post viral fatigue syndrome or PVFS)
    • Crohns Disease
    • Congenital Heart Disease
    • Cystic Fibrosis
    • Dental-Enamel Hypoplasia
    • Dyspepsia
    • Epilepsy (with or without cerebral calcification)
    • Farmers Lung
    • Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease
    • Fibrosing Alveolitis
    • Follicular Keratosis
    • Gall Bladder Disease
    • Gastroparesis
    • Head Aches (Migraine)
    • IBD - Irritable Bowel Disease
    • Impotency
    • Infertility
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • Lung Cavities
    • Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease
    • Myasthenia Gravis
    • Pancreatic Disorders / Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency
    • Peripheral Neuropathy
    • Polymyositis
    • Polyneuropathy
    • Primary Biliary Cirrhosis
    • Pulmonary Hemosiderosis
    • Recurrent Pericarditis
    • Sarcoidosis
    • Schizophrenia / Mental Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Scleroderma
    • Short Stature, Delayed Puberty
    • Small-Intestinal Adenocarcinomas
    • Spontaneous Abortion and Fetal Growth Retardation
    • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
    • Thrombocytosis (Hyposplenism)
    • Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP)
    • Thyrotoxicosis
    • Vasculitis
    • Vitamin K Deficiency

    Celiac Disease Screening Recommendations by Organization

    Edited by Scott Adams

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Addisons Disease Alopecia Anxiety and Depression Ataxia Attention Deficit Disorder / ADHD Autism and Celiac Disease Autoimmune Hepatitis / Chronic Active Hepatitis Bird Fancieris Lung Brain White-Matter Lesions Cerebellar Atrophy Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (myalgic encephalomyelitis or ME, PVS, post viral fatigue syndrome or PVFS) Crohns Disease Congenital Heart Disease Cystic Fibrosis Dental-Enamel Hypoplasia Dyspepsia Epilepsy (with or without cerebral calcification) Farmeris Lung Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease Fibrosing Alveolitis Follicular Keratosis Gall Bladder Disease Gastroparesis Head Aches (Migraine) IBD - Irritable...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/16/2015 - Most people with celiac disease suffer from classic symptoms like weight-loss and diarrhea before diagnosis, right? Wrong. In fact, the most common medical issues for people with celiac disease might really surprise you.
    A team of researchers who recently looked at data on 770 celiac patients admitted to S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital from January 1998 to December 2012, found that even though 80% of people with celiac disease have symptoms other than diarrhea, only 1 in 3 people with celiac disease shows classical malabsorption symptoms.
    Notably, two out of three people with celiac disease show non-classical symptoms. The majority...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/03/2018 - The vast majority of celiac disease remain undiagnosed, and clinical testing is usually done on a case by case basis. Factor in vague or atypical symptoms, and you have a recipe for delayed diagnosis and unnecessary suffering. What determines who gets tested, and are current screening methods working?
    A team of researchers recently set out to assess the factors that determine diagnostic testing, along with the frequency of clinical testing in patients with undiagnosed celiac disease. The research team included I. A. Hujoel, C. T. Van Dyke, T. Brantner, J. Larson, K. S. King, A. Sharma J. A. Murray, and A. Rubio‐Tapia. Th...

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 06/11/2020 - Who should get screened for celiac disease? Traditionally, doctors test for celiac disease, based on the following factors:
    Signs and symptoms of malabsorption, including chronic diarrhea with weight loss, steatorrhea, abdominal pain after eating, and bloating, or: Laboratory evidence of malabsorption, particularly in people who have a first-degree family member with a confirmed celiac disease diagnosis. This includes associated nutritional deficiencies, or: A personal history of an autoimmune disease, or an IgA deficiency, or: Biopsy-proven DH, iron-deficiency anemia refractory to oral supplementation...