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  • Jefferson Adams
    Asian-style Gluten-Free Pork and Cucumber Salad
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Foodista
    Celiac.com 08/25/2018 - Meat makes a great anchor for so many good salads. You’ve got your chicken Caesar, you’ve got your steak salad. This recipe lets you turn a corner and head into fresh territory with ground pork. This simple, easy gluten-free salad is sure to gain fans at your next food gathering. The recipe blends browned ground pork with garlic, ginger, soy sauce, chili pepper and a few other things to make some culinary magic.
    Ingredients:
    1 pound ground pork 1 cup long-grain white rice 1 tablespoon cooking oil 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1 small red chili (seeded if desired), finely chopped 2½ tablespoons fresh ginger, grated 2 tablespoons gluten-free soy sauce 5 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1 tablespoon sugar 1 English or Persian cucumber, thinly sliced 2 scallions, thinly sliced 1 cup fresh cilantro ½ cup fresh mint
    Directions:
    Brown ground pork in cast-iron skillet in canola oil, 7 minutes. Toss with garlic, red chili, and 2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger. Remove from heat and toss with 2½ tablespoons lime juice and 1 gluten-free soy sauce.
    In a bowl, stir together 2½ tablespoons lime juice, 1 tablespoon of gluten-free soy sauce, ½ tablespoon grated ginger and sugar. Toss with cucumber and scallions, and then fold in the cilantro and mint. 
    Serve with pork over rice.

    Kate Ozello
    No Halloween Tears Please
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Kevin_Dooley
    Celiac.com 08/24/2018 - Last year was our first gluten-free Halloween and my older son, James (now in 5th grade) got really upset when he realized that he wouldn’t be able to eat a lot of the candy from trick or treat night. He was saying he didn’t want to trick or treat and for awhile wouldn’t pick out a costume. (Prior to this, he loved dressing up and trick-or-treating.)
    We solved this problem by having an unsafe candy auction for both of our boys, at the end of the evening. I went out and bought individual candies that I knew they liked (as opposed to bags of it) and non-food treats (small toys, sillybanz - stuff you might put in their stocking at Christmas). When they came home from trick-or-treating, we emptied their bags and divided the candy up: safe pile and unsafe or questionable pile.
    Then I had my bag of surprise treats - I don’t know if you are a Survivor fan, but I did it kind of like their food auction. I held up something like two containers of cotton candy and asked how many unsafe candies they would pay for it - except unlike Survivor - both boys bought it, not just one. Maybe they would shout out “five candies” - we had a separate bag for the “payment” they “paid” for all the safe candies and treats.
    (My husband took the bag of unsafe candies to work where he was VERY popular.) At the end of the auction, I had something a little bigger, I can’t remember what it was (maybe a ds game?) The “payment” for the last, big treat was the rest of their unsafe candy.
    I hope this helps you as Halloween approaches. My kids loved it and No-one cried.

    Jefferson Adams
    Green Banana Flour Could Be the Key to a Healthier Gluten-Free Future
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Mauren Veras
    Celiac.com 08/23/2018 - With the market for gluten-free goods and ingredients going like gang-busters, the proliferation of new flours made from previously unavailable ingredients is helping to change the product manufacturing landscape and to open up whole new avenues of nutrition, health benefits and flavor for people with celiac disease.
    One of the latest gluten-free flours to hit the market  is banana flour, an alternative to wheat flour that has gained popularity for its light, fluffy baking results. Made of 100% dried, ground green bananas, banana flour is not only gluten-free but also paleo, Whole30-approved, and vegan. Highly nutritious banana flour also touts numerous health benefits.
    In addition to being naturally gluten-free, banana flour is similar in calories to regular white flour, but is made from a completely different type of carbohydrate. While white flour is made from simple starches that are quickly absorbed and turned into energy, banana flour contains high levels of what is called “resistant starch.” Resistant starches are so-called, because they work a bit like soluble fiber, slowing the digestion of carbohydrates, and resisting absorption by the gut. Resistant starches are also found in foods such as whole grains, vegetables, and legumes.
    “Resistant starch has been found to be beneficial for colon health, increasing satiety levels, and lowering blood sugar,” said registered dietitian Amy Margulies.  “Banana flour also contains high levels of phenolic acid, a type of phytochemical found in many plant foods, which works like an antioxidant and supplies both potassium and vitamin B6.”
    Banana flour not only produces light, fluffy baked goods with a good nutrition profile, it is also easy to use. When substituting banana flour for wheat flour in a recipe, simply use about 30% less banana flour.

    Jefferson Adams
    Local Pharmacists Might Need More Training to Help Celiac Disease Customers
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Ninian Reid
    Celiac.com 08/22/2018 - There’s been some data to support the idea that local pharmacists might have an important role to play in helping people with celiac disease to remain gluten-free by providing information about possible gluten in drugs, and even liaising with manufacturers for gluten information on the patient’s behalf, as needed.
    But how solid is your local pharmacist when it comes to celiac disease awareness? A team of researchers recently set out to evaluate pharmacists' knowledge of celiac disease, and to look for areas where further information may be beneficial.
    The research team included Carmela Avena-Woods, PharmD, BS Pharm; Robert A. Mangione, EdD; and Wenchen Kenneth Wu, PhD, MBA. They are all with St. John's University in Queens, New York. To gather data for their evaluation, their team sent a survey to community pharmacists who practice in a national chain pharmacy in one region of New Jersey and New York.
    A total of 418 pharmacists, just under 40%, responded to the survey. Sixty percent of the responses correctly noted that there are currently no federal regulations requiring manufacturers to designate medications as gluten-free. Still, forty percent got that wrong. Perhaps most alarmingly, of the pharmacists who claimed a basic or advanced understanding of celiac disease, only 27% correctly indicated that celiac disease is both an autoimmune and a chronic lifelong disease. 
    Interestingly, twenty percent of pharmacists said they often suggested a change of diet to people with suspected celiac disease before a clinical diagnosis was made.
    This study suggests that community pharmacists have some understanding of celiac disease, but that additional celiac education is advisable if they are to play an integral role in helping people with celiac disease to maintain a gluten-free diet.
    Read more at: Am J Pharm Educ. 2018;82(2)
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Latest Study Says Celiac Disease Reduces Ovarian Reserves
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Thomas van de Weerd
    08/21/2018 - Does celiac disease have any kind of adverse effect on ovarian reserve levels in women of reproductive age? To get an answer, a team of researchers recently conducted a study of ovarian reserve in patients of reproductive age with celiac disease using anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels, antral follicle counts (AFCs), and ovarian volume.
    The research team included Erol Cakmak, Savas Karakus, Ozlem Demirpence, and Banu Demet Coskun. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology, the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the Department of Biochemistry, Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey, and with the Department of Gastroenterology, Kayseri Training and Research Hospital in Kayseri, Turkey.
    For this study, their team included 46 female celiac patients and 40 healthy female subjects of reproductive age, 18–45 years of age. 
    The team drew blood samples from both groups on days 2–4 of the menstrual cycle, and measured follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E2), prolactin (PRL), and AMH levels. On the same day, the team measured AFCs and ovarian volume for each patient. They also recorded patient body mass index (BMI), gravidity/parity/abortions/alive counts, disease duration, and Marsh histological classification.
    The results showed no statistically significant differences between celiac disease patients and control groups in terms of mean age, BMI, or median gravidity/parity/abortions/alive counts.  Also, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of average FSH, LH, E2, PRL levels, right and left ovarian volumes, and median right and left ovarian AFCs. 
    The team found AMH levels to be markedly lower in the celiac group. The Spearman correlation test showed no significant connection between AMH levels and age, BMI, FSH, LH, E2, PRL levels, right and left ovarian volumes, right and left ovarian AFCs, or Marsh histological classification.
    However, the team did find that, compared to healthy controls, female celiac patients of reproductive age showed decreased AMH levels and ovarian reserves that reflected the length of celiac duration; the longer the celiac disease, the greater the decrease.
    It appears that, especially over time, celiac disease can reduce ovarian reserves, which could have an adverse affect on fertility. 
    Read more at:  Med Sci Monit. 2018; 24: 1152–1157.
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Food Knowledge and Mental Stress Are Big Predictors of Gluten‐Free Diet Success
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Lefteris Heretakis
    Celiac.com 08/20/2018 - Following a gluten-free diet is critical for people with celiac disease. However, the factors that influence gluten-free diet success for people with celiac disease are not well understood on a population-wide scale.
    A team of researchers recently set out to assess the factors that influence gluten‐free diet adherence in patients with celiac disease. The research team included E. P. Halmos, M. Deng, S. R. Knowles, K. Sainsbury, B. Mullan, and J. A. Tye‐Din.
    The team asked celiac patients to complete an online survey that included the validated Celiac Dietary Adherence Test, along with questions on demographics, details of diagnosis and management and assessment of diet knowledge, quality of life and psychological distress. The team then reviewed the survey data for predictors of adherence and quality of life.
    There were a total of 7,393 survey responses, with 5,310 people completing the Celiac Dietary Adherence Test, and 3,230 of whom were following a gluten‐free diet. 
    Multivariate regression showed that predictors of gluten-free dietary adherence included older age, being male, symptoms severity after gluten consumption, above average gluten-free food knowledge, and lower risk of psychological distress. People with celiac disease who followed a gluten-free diet also reported better quality of life. 
    Respondents who reported having poor food knowledge were more likely to wrongly identify gluten‐free foods, though they could still recognize gluten‐containing foods. This indicates that poor overall food knowledge may lead people with celiac disease to over‐restrict their diet. Poor understanding of gluten‐free diet and stressful psychological well-being were the main modifiable risk factors for failure to follow a gluten‐free diet in patients with celiac disease. 
    From these responses, the team concluded that access to a dietitian and mental health care professional, in cases of psychological stress, is likely necessary to improve gluten-free dietary observation, and thus to improve overall patient health and well-being.
    Read more at: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeuticsdoi.org/10.1111/apt.14791
     
    The researchers in this study are variously affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital in Parkville, Victoria, Australia, the Department of Gastroenterology, Central Clinical School, Monash University in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, the Cartovera Pty. Ltd. in Adelaide, SA, Australia, the Department of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology in Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia, the Department of Mental Health, St Vincent's Hospital in Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia, the Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne in Parkville, Victoria, Australia, Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University in Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK, the Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine Research Group, School of Psychology, Curtin University in Bentley, WA, Australia, the Immunology Division, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Parkville, Victoria, Australia, and the Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne in Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

    Jefferson Adams
    Gluten-Free Chicken with Lemon Sauce and Capers
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Annabelle Orozco
    Celiac.com 08/18/2018 - This happy marriage of tangy lemon, salty capers and spices turn ordinary chicken breasts into an extraordinary entree. Easy to make and sure to appeal to even picky eaters, this creamy, tangy recipe will take your chicken from seven to eleven in no time.
    Ingredients:
    4 chicken cutlets 1½ cups chicken broth 5 tablespoons potato starch 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoons capers 4 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 teaspoon lemon pepper 1 splash heavy cream Zest and juice of 1 lemon Parsley, for garnish, as desired Directions:
    On a plate, combine kosher salt, pepper, lemon pepper and 2 tablespoons of potato starch. 
    Cover the chicken cutlets in potato starch mixture and place on a separate plate. 
    Sprinkle half of the lemon zest over the cutlets and gently pat it on.
    Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. 
    Brown chicken until cooked through, about 3-4 minutes on each side. 
    Move browned cutlets to a fresh plate.
    In a bowl, whisk lemon juice, chicken broth, capers, garlic and remaining zest until smooth. 
    Pour into skillet with drippings and whisk until blended. 
    Add cream, as desired and stir until blended and smooth. 
    Return chicken to pan and heat for about 2 minutes. 
    Serve cutlets on white rice with your favorite vegetables on the side.
    Spoon sauce over cutlets and garnish with parsley, as desired.

    Alexander R. Shikhman, MD, PhD, FACR
    The Connection between Gluten Intolerance and Sjogren’s Syndrome
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Ryan Cadby
    Celiac.com 08/17/2018 - Mucosal dryness is among the top non-gastrointestinal complaints of patients with gluten intolerance and celiac disease.
    Prolonged eye dryness, itching and chronic inflammation of the eye lids (blepharitis), mouth dryness, excessive thirst, frequent yeast infections, skin dryness and vaginal dryness in women may represent clinical symptoms of Sjogren’s syndrome. Named after Swedish ophthalmologist Henrik Sjögren, Sjogren’s syndrome is one the most common (and one of the most commonly underdiagnosed) rheumatic/autoimmune diseases. The disease most frequently affects women (10 women for every man) and usually appears in women around and after menopause. However, the disease can affect either gender at any age.
    In addition to mucosal and skin dryness, Sjogren’s syndrome can cause joint pain and stiffness, damage to peripheral nerves leading to numbness and tingling of fingers and toes, fatigue, brain fog, inflammation of blood vessels, hair loss, poor food digestion due to pancreatic damage and various problems with the cardiac muscle and its conduction system causing arrythmia and myocarditis. Patients suffering from Sjogren’s syndrome quite frequently deal with recurring yeast infections, chronic periodontal disease, recurring canker sores and poor dental health.
    The diagnosis of Sjogren’s syndrome is based on:
    Demonstration of mucosal dryness upon physical examination Specific blood tests (positive anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies, elevated levels of serum immunoglobulin G) Ultrasound imaging of salivary glands On rare occasions, a diagnosis of Sjogren’s syndrome requires confirmation through a small salivary gland biopsy or special nuclear medicine studies.
    It is well documented that patients with gluten intolerance and celiac disease have an increased risk of Sjogren’s syndrome. Similarly, patients with Sjogren’s syndrome are characterized by the increased prevalence of gluten intolerance and celiac disease.
    The connection between Sjogren’s syndrome and gluten intolerance is not a coincidental one: there are well-studied molecular mechanisms explaining this link. In the late 1980s/early 1990s genetic studies in Sjogren’s patients demonstrated an increased presence of the class II major histocompatibility complex protein HLA DQ2. Furthermore, HLA DQ2 positivity was found to be associated with increased titers of Sjogren’s specific anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies. The link between gluten and Sjogren’s syndrome became obvious in the mid to late 1990s when it was discovered that HLA-DQ2 binds to deamidated gluten peptides and presents them to mucosal CD4+ T cells thus initiating a chain of events eventually leading to autoimmune responses.
    The second set of data came from the discovery of BM180 protein. This protein regulates tear secretion in the lacrimal acinar cells. Suprisingly, amino acid sequence of BM180 has a similarity with alpha-gliadin and, therefore, can attract inflammatory cells activated by gluten thus contributing to the development of eye dryness.
    The actual prevalence of gluten intolerance in Sjogren’s patients based on published data varies from 20% to 40% depending on the criteria used to define gluten intolerance. The data from our clinic (Institute for Specialized Medicine) indicate that gluten intolerance can affect almost half of patients with Sjogren’s syndrome. Additionally, our data show that one third of patients with gluten intolerance have evidence of mucosal dryness and Sjogren’s syndrome.
    The frequency of documented celiac disease in patients with Sjogren’s syndrome is in the vicinity of 5%.
    The following is a patient case history from our clinic:
    A 28 year old woman was seen in our clinic due to her complaints of long-standing irritable bowel syndrome and recent onset of eye dryness. Her initial presentation included abdominal pain, bloating and irregular bowel movements. She was seen by several gastroenterologists and underwent several upper endoscopies and colonoscopies with mucosal biopsies which were non-diagnostic. Her lab test results showed positive IgG anti-gliadin antibodies and she was told that “this is a common finding among healthy people, and is not indicative of any illnesses.” She was seen by her ophthalmologist and prescribed with contact lenses which she could not wear due to significant eye discomfort and irritation. Further eye examination showed that she had diminished tear production and was referred to our clinic to rule out Sjogren’s syndrome. Upon physical examination in our clinic the patient not only demonstrated profound eye dryness but also showed evidence of dry mouth, fissured tongue and patchy areas of thrush as well as very dry skin. A sonographic evaluation of her major salivary glands was suspicious for moderately advanced Sjogren’s syndrome. Her laboratory test results showed: positive anti-SSA/Ro antibodies, elevated serum immunoglobulin G, low neutrophil count as well as low levels of vitamin D and ferritin (a serum marker of iron storage state). Also, the patient was found to have positive serum IgG and salivary IgA anti-gliadin antibodies as well as positive HLA DQ2 (a molecular marker associated with gluten intolerance).
    Based on a combination of clinical history, physical findings and laboratory test results, the patient was diagnosed with gluten intolerance and Sjogren’s syndrome. In addition to the aforementioned tests, the patient underwent food intolerance testing based on serum IgG4 antibodies which showed not only gluten but also cow’s casein intolerance. Her treatment options included a traditional route of therapy based on drugs or an integrative approach based on dietary modifications and food supplements. She opted for the integrative approach and started a gluten-free and dairy-free diet as well as iron glycinate, vitamin D, specific probiotics and digestive enzymes.
    After the first month on the diet and supplements, she reported a remarkable improvement of her irritable bowel symptoms and in three months, she started noticing an improvement of the dryness. Laboratory tests performed six months after initiation of the therapy showed normalization of the IgG level, disappearance of anti-SSA/Ro antibodies and a slightly suppressed neutrophil count. Through following the prescribed diet and supplements she is now symptom free.
    Why do we need to treat Sjogren’s syndrome? Left untreated, Sjogren’s syndrome can cause debilitating dryness affecting gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. Clinically, this manifests as difficulty in swallowing solid foods, heartburn, malabsorption of nutrients and minerals, bloating, weight loss, chronic sinus infections and prolonged dry cough. Sjogren’s syndrome also significantly increases the risk for malignancies affecting lymphatic nodules, known as lymphomas.
    Therapy for Sjogren’s syndrome is based on the treatment of mucosal dryness and the autoimmune component of the disease. In addition, patients affected by Sjogren’s syndrome need to have regular screenings for malignancies (specifically lymphomas) and premalignant conditions.
    Traditional therapy for Sjogren’s syndrome (treatment of dryness):
    Cyclosporin (brand name Restasis) eye drops and artificial tears for dry eyes. Numoisyn lozenges and liquid, as well as Caphosol for mouth dryness and mucositis. Cevimeline (brand name Evoxac) and pilocarpine (brand name Salagen) for systemic dryness therapy. Treatment of autoimmune disturbances:
    Hydroxychloroquin (brand name Plaquenil). Leflunomide (brand name Arava). Severe autoimmune conditions associated with Sjogren’s syndrome are treated with the biologic drug rituximab (brand name Rituxan). Integrative therapy for Sjogren’s syndrome. Ear acupuncture (auricular therapy) and body acupuncture to stimulate tear and saliva production. Elimination diet based on individual food-intolerance profiles. Oral probiotics (for example, BLIS K12) and intestinal probiotics. Digestive enzymes. Fish and krill oils. Black currant seed oil. Cordyceps sinensis in combination with wormwood extract to treat the autoimmune component of Sjogren’s syndrome. Zinc and elderberry lozenges. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and glutathione. Our extensive clinical experience demonstrate that early cases of Sjogren’s syndrome can be completely reversed (by both clinical and laboratory criteria) by the strict gluten-free and elimination diet. The advanced cases cannot be reversed; however, even in advanced cases the gluten-free and elimination diet can slow the progression of the disease.
    If you’re concerned that dryness may represent Sjogren’s syndrome, see a rheumatologist for further evaluation and management of your condition.
    References:
    Alvarez-Celorio MD, Angeles-Angeles A, Kraus A. Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome and Celiac Disease: Causal Association or Serendipity? J Clin Rheumatol. 2000 Aug;6(4):194-7. Asrani AC, Lumsden AJ, Kumar R, Laurie GW. Gene cloning of BM180, a lacrimal gland enriched basement membrane protein with a role in stimulated secretion. Adv Exp Med Biol. 1998;438:49-54. Feuerstein J. Reversal of premature ovarian failure in a patient with Sjögren syndrome using an elimination diet protocol. J Altern Complement Med. 2010 Jul;16(7):807-9. Iltanen S, Collin P, Korpela M, Holm K, Partanen J, Polvi A, Mäki M. Celiac disease and markers of celiac disease latency in patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome. Am J Gastroenterol. 1999 Apr;94(4):1042-6. Lemon S, Imbesi S., Shikhman A.R. Salivary gland imaging in Sjogren’s syndrome. Future Rheumatology, 2007 2(1):83-92. Roblin X, Helluwaert F, Bonaz B. Celiac disease must be evaluated in patients with Sjögren syndrome. Arch Intern Med. 2004 Nov 22;164(21):2387. Teppo AM, Maury CP. Antibodies to gliadin, gluten and reticulin glycoprotein in rheumatic diseases: elevated levels in Sjögren’s syndrome. Clin Exp Immunol. 1984 Jul;57(1):73-8.

    Jefferson Adams
    Can a Gluten-Free Diet Normalize Vitamin D Levels for Celiac Patients?
    Image Caption: Image: CC--NASA/Goddard/SDO
    Celiac.com 08/16/2018 - What is the significance of vitamin D serum levels in adult celiac patients? A pair of researchers recently set out to assess the value and significance of 25(OH) and 1,25(OH) vitamin D serum levels in adult celiac patients through a comprehensive review of medical literature.
    Researchers included F Zingone and C Ciacci are affiliated with the Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy; and the Celiac Center, AOU San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi di Aragona, University of Salerno, Department of Medicine and Surgery, Salerno, Italy. 
    Within the wide spectrum of symptoms and alteration of systems that characterizes celiac disease, several studies indicate a low-level of vitamin D, therefore recent guidelines suggest its evaluation at the time of diagnosis. This review examines the data from existing studies in which vitamin D has been assessed in celiac patients. 
    Our review indicates that most of the studies on vitamin D in adult celiac disease report a 25 (OH) vitamin D deficiency at diagnosis that disappears when the patient goes on a gluten-free diet, independently of any supplementation. Instead, the researchers found that levels of calcitriol, the active 1,25 (OH) form of vitamin D, fell within the normal range at the time of celiac diagnosis. 
    Basically, their study strongly suggests that people with celiac disease can recover normal vitamin D levels through a gluten-free diet, without requiring any supplementation.
    Source:
    Dig Liver Dis. 2018 Aug;50(8):757-760. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2018.04.005. Epub 2018 Apr 13.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Could Gluten-Free Food Be Hurting Your Dog?
    Image Caption: Image: CC--angela n.
    Celiac.com 08/15/2018 - Grain-free food has been linked to heart disease in dogs. A canine cardiovascular disease that has historically been seen in just a few breeds is becoming more common in other breeds, and one possible culprit is grain-free dog food. 
    The disease in question is called canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and often results in congestive heart failure. DCM is historically common in large dogs such as Great Danes, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, Saint Bernards and Doberman Pinschers, though it is also affects some Cocker Spaniels.  Numerous cases of DCM have been reported in smaller dogs, whose primary source of nutrition was food containing peas, lentils, other legume seeds or potatoes as main ingredients. These reported atypical DCM cases included Golden and Labrador Retrievers, a Whippet, a Shih Tzu, a Bulldog and Miniature Schnauzers, as well as mixed breeds. 
    As a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veterinary Medicine, along with a group of veterinary diagnostic laboratories, is investigating the possible link between DCM and pet foods containing seeds or potatoes as main ingredients. The good news is that in cases where the dog suffers no genetic component, and the disease is caught early, simple veterinary treatment and dietary change may improve heart function.
    According to Nutritional Outlook, an industry publication for makers of dietary supplements and healthy foods and beverages, there is a growing market for “free from” foods for dogs, especially gluten-free and grain-free formulations. In 2017, about one in five dog foods launched was gluten-free. So, do dogs really need to eat grain-free or gluten-free food? Probably not, according to PetMD, which notes that many pet owners are simply projecting their own food biases when choosing dog food.
    Genetically, dogs are well adapted to easily digest grains and other carbohydrates. Also, beef and dairy remain the most common allergens for dogs, so even dogs with allergies are unlikely to need to need grain-free food. 
    So, the take away here seems to be that most dogs don’t need grain-free or gluten-free food, and that it might actually be bad for the dog, not good, as the owner might imagine.
    Stay tuned for more on the FDA’s investigation and any findings they make.
    Read more at Bizjournals.com
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Did You Miss the Gluten-Free Fireworks This Past Fourth of July?
    Image Caption: Image: CC--MATSUOKA Kohei
    Celiac.com 08/14/2018 - Occasionally, Celiac.com learns of an amusing gluten-free story after the fact. Such is the case of the “Gluten-Free Fireworks.” 
    We recently learned about a funny little event that happened leading up to Fourth of July celebrations in the town of Springdale in Northwest Arkansas. It seems that a sign advertising "Gluten Free Fireworks" popped up near a fireworks stand on interstate 49 in Springdale. 
    In case you missed the recent dose of Fourth of July humor, in an effort to attract customers and provide a bit of holiday levity, Pinnacle Fireworks put up a sign advertising "gluten-free fireworks.” 
    The small company is owned by Adam Keeley and his father. "A lot of the people that come in want to crack a joke right along with you," Keeley said. "Every now and then, you will get someone that comes in and says so fireworks are supposed to be gluten-free right? Have I been buying fireworks that have gluten? So then I say no, no they are gluten-free. It's just a little fun."
    Keeley said that their stand saw a steady flow of customers in the week leading up to the Fourth. In addition to selling “gluten-free” fireworks, each fireworks package sold by Pinnacle features a QR code. The code can be scanned with a smartphone. The link leads to a video showing what the fireworks look like.
    We at Celiac.com hope you and your family had a safe, enjoyable, and, yes, gluten-free Fourth of July. Stay tuned for more on gluten-free fireworks and other zany, tongue-in-cheek stories.
    Read more at kark.com
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Stress-Related Disorders Associated with Higher Risk for Autoimmune Disease
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Jacob Bøtter
    Celiac.com 08/13/2018 - It’s not uncommon for people to have psychiatric reactions to stressful life events, and these reactions may trigger some immune dysfunction. Researchers don’t yet know whether such reactions increase overall risk of autoimmune disease.
    Are psychiatric reactions induced by trauma or other life stressors associated with subsequent risk of autoimmune disease? Are stress-related disorders significantly associated with risk of subsequent autoimmune disease?
    A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether there is an association between stress-related disorders and subsequent autoimmune disease. The research team included Huan Song, MD, PhD; Fang Fang, MD, PhD; Gunnar Tomasson, MD, PhD; Filip K. Arnberg, PhD; David Mataix-Cols, PhD; Lorena Fernández de la Cruz, PhD; Catarina Almqvist, MD, PhD; Katja Fall, MD, PhD; Unnur A. Valdimarsdóttir, PhD.
    They are variously affiliated with the Center of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Centre for Rheumatology Research, University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland; the National Centre for Disaster Psychiatry, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; the Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; the Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden; the Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; the Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; and the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
    The team conducted a Swedish register-based retrospective cohort study that included 106, 464 patients with stress-related disorders, 1,064 ,640 matched unexposed individuals, and 126 ,652 full siblings to determine whether a clinical diagnosis of stress-related disorders was significantly associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease.
    The team identified stress-related disorder and autoimmune diseases using the National Patient Register. They used Cox model to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs of 41 autoimmune diseases beyond 1 year after the diagnosis of stress-related disorders, controlling for multiple risk factors.
    The data showed that being diagnosed with a stress-related disorder, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, acute stress reaction, adjustment disorder, and other stress reactions, was significantly associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease, compared with matched unexposed individuals. The team is calling for further studies to better understand the associations and the underlying factors.
    Source:
    JAMA. 2018;319(23):2388-2400. doi:10.1001/jama.2018.7028  

    Jefferson Adams
    Gluten-Free Bacon-Wrapped Chicken Breasts
    Image Caption: Image: CC--megan.chromik
    Celiac.com 08/11/2018 - Need a quick, easy, reliable gluten-free dish that will satisfy everyone and leave the cook with plenty of time to relax? This recipe is sure to do the trick. Best of all, it's super easy. Just grab some chicken breasts, season them, hit them with a sprig of rosemary, wrap some bacon around them, and chuck them on the grill and call it dinner. Okay, you can add some rice and veggies.
    Ingredients:
    4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves 4 thick slices bacon 4 teaspoons garlic powder 4 small sprigs fresh rosemary salt and pepper to taste Directions:
    Heat an outdoor grill to medium-high heat, and lightly oil the grate.
    Sprinkle 1 teaspoon garlic powder on a chicken breast and season with salt and pepper. 
    Place a rosemary sprig on each chicken breast. 
    Wrap the bacon around the chicken and the rosemary. 
    Hold bacon in place with a toothpick or extra rosemary stem.
    Cook the chicken breasts until no longer pink in the center and the juices run clear, about 8 minutes per side. 
    Keep an eye out for any grill flare ups from the bacon grease. 
    Remove the toothpicks and serve with steamed rice and your favorite vegetables for a winning meal.

    Connie Sarros
    Five-Minute Healthy Breakfasts
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Karen
    Celiac.com 08/10/2018 - You’ve heard for years that it’s wise to start your day with a healthy breakfast.  Eating food first thing in the morning gets your metabolism revved so you have energy throughout the day.  There’s also the issue of incorporating healthy foods into your first meal of the day.  Ideally, every meal should include fiber and foods from a variety of food groups.  But the reality is that most people don’t have time in the morning to create an involved meal.  You’re busy getting ready for work, packing the kids’ lunches and trying to get everyone out of the door on time.  
    Don’t fret.  The task of preparing a healthy breakfast just got easier.  You can make 5-minute breakfasts and, with a little bit of planning, you can sneak fiber into those meals without spending a lot of extra time with preparation.  An ideal breakfast will include whole grains (from gluten-free cereals, breads, muffins, or uncontaminated oats), a low-fat dairy item (1% milk, low-fat yogurt, or low-fat cheese), and a source of protein (such as peanut butter or eggs).  Adding fruit is a plus.  
    If you can tolerate uncontaminated oats, make a bowl of oatmeal and add a little extra fiber by stirring in chopped walnuts and dried cranberries.  If you like scrambled eggs, toss some fresh spinach (sliced into thin strips), 1 chopped canned artichoke heart, two tablespoons crumbled feta cheese, and a dash of Italian seasoning to the egg as it cooks.  
    If you have time on weekends to make healthy gluten-free pancakes (which  means that you added perhaps flax seed meal or shredded apples or something that qualifies as fiber to the batter), then freeze the pancakes between sheets of wax paper, place them in a freezer bag, and freeze so they’ll be handy on busy weekday mornings.  If you don’t have time to make them prior to need, you can always use commercial frozen gluten-free pancakes.  In a bowl, mix together a few raisins, half of a chopped pear or apple, a few dashes of cinnamon and a couple of tablespoons of chopped walnuts.  Spoon this mixture down the centers of two toasted (or microwaved) pancakes, drizzle each with 1 teaspoon of pancake or maple syrup, then fold in the sides of the pancakes to make two breakfast sandwiches.
    Brown rice is brown because the bran layer is still on the rice, and the bran layer is the part that’s so high in fiber.  White rice is much lower in fiber and has less nutritional value.  Brown rice isn’t just for dinner anymore.  It offers a nice breakfast alternative from traditional hot cereals.  The next time you make brown rice for dinner, make a little extra and save some for breakfast the next morning.  In the A.M., mix the rice (about 1 cup) with a few chopped pecans, a few raisins, 1/2 cup milk, 3 tablespoons pancake syrup, a dash each of vanilla and cinnamon, then microwave the mixture for 1 minute, stirring once after 30 seconds.  Let it sit for 30 seconds to thicken before eating.  Or stir together 1 cup cooked brown rice, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/2 navel orange diced, some chopped dates, dried cranberries, and shredded coconut; heat this in the microwave and then top it off with 1/2 cup low-fat vanilla yogurt.
    Just a note about using the microwave—it’s not an exact science.  Different ovens have different power levels so what cooks in 30 seconds in one person’s microwave may take 45 seconds in someone else’s unit.  Unless you want the food to splatter all over the sides of the oven, you’ll need to cover any liquids or soft foods with waxed paper.  
    There will be days when you don’t have time to sit down at the table and enjoy a leisurely breakfast.  On these days, make a “grab-and-go” breakfast that you can take with you.  Gluten-free wraps keep for several weeks in the refrigerator and they make great fill-and-go containers on busy mornings.  Spread a wrap with peanut butter, sprinkle some fortified gluten-free dry cereal on top, then drizzle with a teaspoon of pancake syrup; roll up the wrap and you have the perfect dashboard dining breakfast to eat on the way to work.  Or scramble an egg, spoon it down the center of the wrap, and then top it off with a little salsa and pepper-jack cheese before rolling it up. If you only have three minutes before you have to leave the house, spoon some low-fat cottage cheese into a cup, stir in a dash of cinnamon, top with a little low-fat gluten-free granola or fortified dry gluten-free cereal, sprinkle berries or chopped peaches over the top, grab a spoon, and you’re ready to go!
    Smoothies can be made in literally one minute.  Toss some frozen raspberries into a blender, add a 12-ounce container of low-fat lemon yogurt, a little milk, and two teaspoons of vanilla; blend, then pour the mixture into a large plastic cup.
    If you oversleep, don’t panic.  Have some back-up foods on hand that you can grab and eat en route to work, like a gluten-free protein bar and a banana, or a bag of nuts and dried fruit, or flax seed crackers with a handful of cheese cubes, or toss some gluten-free granola over a container of yogurt and grab a spoon to take along.
    All of the above suggestions can be made in five minutes or less.  Take the time to start your day off with a healthy breakfast—you deserve to do that for yourself and for your family.
    Apple English Muffins by Connie Sarros
    This recipe is from my newly-released book Student’s Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies.  While this isn’t a gluten-free cookbook, most of the recipes are naturally gluten-free or can very easily be converted to gluten-free.  
    Preparation time:  4 minutes.  Cooking time:  30 seconds.  Yield:  1 serving
    Ingredients:
    1 tablespoon peanut butter  1 gluten-free English muffin, toasted  1/8 large apple, peeled, cored and sliced thin ½ teaspoon butter  ¾ teaspoon brown sugar 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon Directions:
    Spread peanut butter on one toasted English muffin half.  Lay the apple slices on top. In a small microwave safe bowl, heat the butter in the microwave on high for 15 seconds.  Stir in the brown sugar and cinnamon then nuke for another 15 seconds.  Stir until smooth.  (If necessary, pop it back into the microwave until the brown sugar melts).   Drizzle the cinnamon mixture over the apple slices then place the second half of the English muffin on top. Note:  If you’re out of apples, use a pear, ripe peach or nectarine, mango, or even a banana.

    Jefferson Adams
    Can a New Gluten-Free Cricket-Flour Cookbook Turn Americans on to Eating Bugs?
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Katja Schulz
    Celiac.com 08/09/2018 - Whatever one might say about crawfish, shrimp and crustaceans in general, Americans don’t typically eat bugs. Can a former Ralph Lauren marketing executive turn the world on to flour made from crickets?
    Over the last few years, Americans have been presented with a buffet of alternative proteins and meals. Robyn Shapiro’s company, Seek, has created all-purpose, gluten-free, and Paleo blended flours, which can be used cup for cup in any recipe calling for flour. 
    The company, which makes pure cricket powder for smoothies, ice creams, and other liquid-based foods, is now selling cinnamon-almond crunch cricket protein and snack bites. To get the public interested in its cricket protein and cricket flour products, Shapiro has collaborated with famous chefs to create recipes for The Cricket Cookbook. 
    The book’s cast includes La Newyorkina chef Fany Gerson, a Mexico City native known for her cricket sundaes; noted Sioux chef and cookbook author Sean Sherman; and former Noma pastry chef Ghetto Gastro member, Malcolm Livingston, among others.
    Other companies have sought to promote the benefits of insect protein, including Chapul, which makes cricket protein bars and powders, and Exo, which makes dairy- and gluten-free cricket protein bars in flavors like cocoa nut and banana bread. These companies, along with others in the business tend to aim their products at Paleo dieters by promising more protein and no dairy.
    Seek’s chef-focused approach makes it unique. By pairing with noted chefs who already use bugs and bug protein in their cooking, Shapiro is looking to make the public more comfortable and confident in using bugs to cook and bake. So far, the response has been slow, but steady. Seek has already raised nearly $13,000 from 28 backers, well on its way toward its $25,000 goal. 
    Seek’s cricket flours and other products will initially only be available via Kickstarter. If that goes well, the products will be sold on Seek’s website. Early backers will get a discount and a chance for a signed copy of the book. Seek hopes to debut their products nationwide starting in the fall. 
    Could gluten-free cricket flour and the new cookbook be the next big gluten-free Christmas gift? Stay tuned for more on this and other gluten-free stories.
    Source:
    grubstreet.com  

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