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    Scott Adams
    Scott Adams

    Atopic Dermatitis Is Common in People with Celiac Disease

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    J Allergy Clin Immunol 2004;113:1199-1203.

    Celiac.com 07/30/2004 - According to a study by Italian researchers published in the June edition of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the prevalence of atopic dermatitis is much more common in those with celiac disease. The researchers looked at 1,044 adults with untreated celiac disease at the point of their diagnoses, as well as 2,752 of their relatives, and 318 of their spouses. They also looked at the prevalence of allergies in celiacs after one year on a gluten-free diet. The subjects filled out a standardized questionnaire upon their diagnosis, and those who reported having an allergy were tested for it using a standard makeup of 20 antigens for serum specific IgE.



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    The researchers found that one celiac in 173 (16.6%) had at least one additional allergy, compared with 523 of their relatives (19%), and 43 of their spouses (13.5%). Patients with celiac disease were also more likely (3.8%) to have atopic dermatitis than their relatives (2.3%) or their spouses (1.3%). The amount of time that the celiac patients went undiagnosed and therefore untreated did not seem to influence the presence of allergy or atopic dermatitis. It is possible that a longer period of time on a gluten-free diet could influence the prevalence of allergy in those with celiac disease, and more research needs to be done to determine if being gluten-free longer can decrease allergies in those with celiac disease.



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    Asthma can be caused by gluten sensitivity as per my case...I am a celiac self diagnosed due to smooth colon per colonoscopy results, osteoporosis, tooth enamel deterioration and awareness of my life of allergies to grasses and much more. Could never get help...so took it into my own research to get off of steroid shots, antihistamines and inhalers that made me sicker. Oh, acid reflux big time also that was all resolved with gluten free diet. God Bless the medical professionals that really care to cure and study to learn what they don't know. Wish I had found them!!

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    well here I am with more questions than answers..

    I am or was a very super active metal fabricator. In 2008 I crushed off six fingers... ok..?

    12 years later here we are...

    I did very well with everything.. stress mgmt.  2 years ago I seem to remember it was a weird year. people were getting sick 2 or 3 times and not getting better.2015 2016. 

    I got sick really sick   backache tons of. well lets be real here.... snot.... infact it got so bad that I said to my lady. I think I am gonna die...

    3 months ago my glands swoll up in my groin and armpits

    ONE MORNING I WOKE UP WITH A BASEBALL SIZE GLAND IN MY NECK....   I freaked out.... I am on clindamycin HCL.

    600 mg a day...lump in neck gone...armpits and groin still lumpy...my weight is scary.....my super ripped muscles are gone....my skin is a mess... so I googled skin problems and here I am... as a young boy I had horrible hay fever..

    that's what it was called in 1976.... haaaa

    I also was tested for food allergies in the 80,S..

    today I AM..LEARNING..  ABSORBING INFO...

    Now I need to heal my painful fingers....millions of microscopic almost to quite visible lines that are dark or dirty for lack of description. Skin is weak?  hurts and splits...I have splits on my right thumb that look like rivers...no blood just harsh pain.....

    I KNOW PAIN...  I hope this effort of mine. Helps someone .. I KNOW I NEED YOUR HELP..  chances are I have a disease that mimics this one.. but   I HAVE TOO MANY SYMPTOMS TO IGNORE THIS..

    thank you... Paul W.    ( MR.FINGERS)

     

     

     

     

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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    Scott Adams
    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Volume 16 Issue 5 Page 428 - August 2005 Celiac.com 09/27/2005 – Italian researchers have discovered a link between celiac disease and chronic urticaria (hives). The researchers conducted a case control study that screened 79 children with chronic urticaria for celiac disease, then compared the results to that of 2,545 healthy controls in order to determine the clinical relevance of any association. Children and adolescents who had chronic hives for at least 6 weeks that did not respond to oral antihistamines were used as subjects in the chronic urticaria group, and each group was screened for celiac disease via anti-transglutaminase and anti-edomysial antibodies, with confirmation done via endoscopic intestinal biopsy.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/15/2011 - Doctors have successfully treated patients with both gastrointestinal and skin disorders by testing for food sensitivities and avoiding foods that provoke those sensitivities. This, according to a team from the University Teaching Hospital in Pavia, Italy, which reported their results at the annual meeting of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, in Istanbul, Turkey.
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    A number of chronic inflammatory and degenerative conditions improve when certain food sensitivities or intolerances are identified, and those offending foods are avoided.
    Conditions that respond favorably include skin problems like eczema and psoriasis, IBS, Crohn’s, celiac disease, and a number of auto-immune diseases.
    Two such studies conducted at the University of Pavia teaching hospital showed positive results using the ALCAT Test. 
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    For the second study on 48 patients, the researchers found that 98% of patients improved on an elimination diet based on ALCAT results.  In particular, patients with higher symptom scores prior to treatment showed the greatest improvement.
    These results echo findings by Dr. Alessio  Fasano that recently provided the first scientific evidence that gluten sensitivity differs from celiac disease at both a molecular level and in the response it triggers in the immune system.
    Continuing research from Dr. Fasano and the team of the Center for Celiac Research identify three factors underlying auto-immune diseases: A hyper-permeable, or, “leaky” gut; genetic pre-disposition; sensitivity to a food, which triggers an adverse reaction.
    The ALCAT test identifies these foods and other factors that act as triggers. The University of Pavia studies reinforce the need for accurate food sensitivity testing in general medicine.
    Source: Cell Science Systems, Corp.
    Note: Cell Science Systems, Corp. (CSS), located in Deerfield Beach, Florida, is a life sciences company and the worldwide market leader in food sensitivity testing as the manufacturer of the ALCAT Test. CSS operates a State of Florida and US government (CLIA) licensed laboratory; as well as an FDA registered, ISO certified, cGMP, medical device manufacturing facility. It is the sole owner of ALCAT Europe, GmbH, near Berlin, Germany, a European Union supported clinical and research facility of ALCAT testing services in the European Community. The ALCAT test identifies cellular reactions to over 350 foods, chemicals and herbs. These inflammatory reactions are linked to chronic health problems like obesity and diabetes, as well as skin, heart, joint, and digestive disorders.



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