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  • Scott Adams

    How much gluten is in wheat germ and wheat bran?

    Scott Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      The key is that wheat germ and wheat bran are not gluten-free.


    Image: CC BY-ND 2.0--mealmakeovermoms
    Caption: Image: CC BY-ND 2.0--mealmakeovermoms

    I don't know how much gluten wheat germ and wheat bran contain, but it is likely to be more than you would find in wheat starch. The key is that wheat germ and wheat bran are not gluten-free. The same is true of barley and rye germ and bran.

    These ingredients are on our Unsafe Non-Gluten-Free list, and should be avoided by people with celiac disease. For safe gluten-free ingredients, be sure to consult our Safe Gluten-Free Food and Ingredients list.

    Edited by Scott Adams

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    what I need is a suitable replacement for wheat bran - rice makes my blood sugar rise and I just read from an ND that quinoa and amaranth are not good for celiac disease either.

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    what I need is a suitable replacement for wheat bran - rice makes my blood sugar rise and I just read from an ND that quinoa and amaranth are not good for celiac disease either.

    An excellent replacement for wheat bran is ground flax seed, you get omega3 in as a great additional benefit.

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    Bran doesn't necessarily contain the same amino acids as endosperm therefore the proteins may differ. I can't find the answer to this anywhere though!

    I agree with you. In addition the nutritional value of wheat germ is outstanding, also the extremely low level of gluten contamination is very likely to cause not reaction in the majority of gluten intolerant folks, so it is worth a try. I believe that you cannot get a cheaper source of natural digestible vitamins than in wheat germ.

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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