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  • Jefferson Adams

    Is There A Connection Between Genetic Traits for Immune-Mediated Diseases and Alzheimer Disease?

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 05/16/2016 - A number of epidemiological and clinical studies suggest a connection between inflammation and Alzheimer disease, their relationship is not well understood and may have implications for treatment and prevention strategies.

    A research team recently set out to figure out if a subset of genes involved with increased risk of inflammation are also associated with increased risk for Alzheimer disease. The research team included JS Yokoyama, Y Wang, AJ Schork, WK Thompson, CM Karch, C Cruchaga, LK McEvoy, A Witoelar, CH Chen, D Holland, JB Brewer, A Franke, WP Dillon, DM Wilson, P Mukherjee, CP Hess, Z Miller, LW Bonham, J Shen, GD Rabinovici, HJ Rosen, BL Miller, BT Hyman, GD Schellenberg, TH Karlsen, OA Andreassen, AM Dale, RS Desikan; and the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.



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    They are variously affiliated with the Departments of Neurosciences, Cognitive Sciences, Psychiatry, and Radiology at the University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, the Departments of Neurology, Radiology and Biomedical Imaging at the University of California, San Francisco, the Department of Psychiatry, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri, the Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, the Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, the Division of Gastroenterology, and the Norwegian PSC Research Center and KG Jebsen Inflammation Research Centre, Research Institute of Internal Medicine, Division of Cancer Medicine, Surgery and Transplantation at Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway, the Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany, the Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, and the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

    Using data from numerous genome-wide association studies from several clinical research centers, the team conducted a genetic epidemiology study in July 2015, in which they systematically investigated genetic overlap between Alzheimer disease (International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project stage 1) and Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, and psoriasis.

    The team assessed P values and odds ratios from genome-wide association studies of more than 100, 000 individuals from previous comparisons of patients vs respective control groups. They used consensus criteria to confirm diagnosis for each disorder previously made in the parent study. The main outcome was the pleiotropic (conjunction) false discovery rate P value.

    Follow-up for candidate variants included neuritic plaque and neurofibrillary tangle pathology; longitudinal Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale cognitive subscale scores as a measure of cognitive dysfunction (Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative); and gene expression in Alzheimer disease vs control brains (Gene Expression Omnibus data).

    These findings confirm genetic overlap between Alzheimer disease and immune-mediated diseases, and suggest that immune system processes influence Alzheimer disease pathogenesis and progression.

    For more detail, and exact data results, see JAMA Neurol. 2016 Apr 18. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2016.0150.

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    The diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease did not exist before the introduction of RoundUp in our American wheat crops (aka GMO crops, aka Monsanto). I have wondered for years if gluten was the reason my celiacs had me so deathly ill for so long, or if it could be this pesticide/herbicide used in our crops. I have my answer now: As it turns out my girlfriend and i have been eating a wheat product from Europe once a month for two years with no reaction. Couple that with the fact that i actually taste a Raid like taste in my mouth when i do eat gluten/American wheat. This RoundUp is the cause of inflammation in our bodies, leading to autism, migraines, and Alzheimer's. If you have celiac to boot, you are basically the opposite of an 'iron stomach' and you have auto immune issues. The constant toll of ingesting a poison like RoundUp wears down the immune system and can have devastating effects, as studies have already linked "gluten" to cancer. Knowledge is power. Eat healthy, live healthy.

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    The diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease did not exist before the introduction of RoundUp in our American wheat crops (aka GMO crops, aka Monsanto). I have wondered for years if gluten was the reason my celiacs had me so deathly ill for so long, or if it could be this pesticide/herbicide used in our crops. I have my answer now: As it turns out my girlfriend and i have been eating a wheat product from Europe once a month for two years with no reaction. Couple that with the fact that i actually taste a Raid like taste in my mouth when i do eat gluten/American wheat. This RoundUp is the cause of inflammation in our bodies, leading to autism, migraines, and Alzheimer's. If you have celiac to boot, you are basically the opposite of an 'iron stomach' and you have auto immune issues. The constant toll of ingesting a poison like RoundUp wears down the immune system and can have devastating effects, as studies have already linked "gluten" to cancer. Knowledge is power. Eat healthy, live healthy.

    Please stop spreading misinformation. You have no scientific evidence for these statements. If you do, please provide them. Peer reviewed if possible.

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    Please stop spreading misinformation. You have no scientific evidence for these statements. If you do, please provide them. Peer reviewed if possible.

    Hmmm...we are simply summarizing a scientific study here that was published in a peer reviewed scientific journal (JAMA). If you have a problem with their results, I recommend that you contact JAMA and asked the scientists who published it why they accepted it for publication: JAMA Neurol. 2016 Apr 18. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2016.0150.

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    Hmmm...we are simply summarizing a scientific study here that was published in a peer reviewed scientific journal (JAMA). If you have a problem with their results, I recommend that you contact JAMA and asked the scientists who published it why they accepted it for publication: JAMA Neurol. 2016 Apr 18. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2016.0150.

    I thought your article was a fine summary of the JAMA article.

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    Please do not listen to Ryan!

     

    Celiac disease is just as common in many European countries as in US. The prevalence is between 1-2%. I am a European celiac and I got sick from eating European grain products. Round up is used in European Union as well.

     

    Besides, if Ryan really has celiac he's harming himself every time he ingests gluten no matter the origin. He may not get symptoms but the damage to his intestines is real.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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