Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Jefferson Adams

    Physicians Caring for Celiac Patients do not Routinely Recommend Screening of First-Degree Family Members

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 01/25/2016 - The latest research says that most fail to recommend celiac screening for first degree relatives, although some doctors are better than others.

    Photo: Wikimedia CommonsIn a recent study, researchers tried to get an idea of just how frequently celiac disease patients receive a physician-issued recommendation for first-degree relative screening.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    The research team included Abhik Roy, Colin Smith, Constantine Daskalakis, Kristin Voorhees, Stephanie Moleski, Anthony J DiMarino, David Kastenberg. They are variously associated with the Division of Biostatistics, the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the Department of Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, and the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness in Pennsylvania.

    For their study, the research team conducted a 12-question survey assessing whether celiac disease patients receive a physician recommendation to screen first-degree relatives for celiac disease, and the impact of such a recommendation, was validated with outpatients in a university gastroenterology practice, called "University"patients. The 12-question survey was then distributed online to members of the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA).

    The team then collected results over 3 months, and used univariate analysis to compare cohort means, and to assess the association between demographic and diagnostic factors and first-degree relative screening recommendations.

    A total of 87 University patients participated in the validation phase. Test-retest reliability of 4 key survey questions was high, with a Kappa coefficient >0.80. The team based its main analyses on data from 677 NFCA and 82 University respondents. Most respondents were female, with an average age of 45 years.

    Nearly 80% of University patients received recommendation for celiac disease screening for first-degree relatives, compared with just 44% of the NFCA respondents (p < 0.001).

    Of patients who did receive a screening recommendation, from either group, 98% percent discussed the recommendation with family members, leading to celiac disease screening in 71% of University patients, and 79% of NFCA respondents, and to a celiac disease diagnosis in 18% of University patients, and 27% of NFCA respondents.

    Physicians commonly fail to mention to their celiac disease patients the importance of screening first-degree family members. Because such screening is so effective, the researchers are suggesting that making such screening recommendations may increase the diagnosis of celiac disease in high risk individuals.

    Source:

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    You just need to ask them to check for the DR haplotype. HLA testing is more expensive when you check more haplotypes - there any many to check. Its a poor analogy, but when looking at a car engine, you can just check the oil, or you can also check the radiator, spark plugs and carburetor.
    there are two DR types for each person - one from each parent. If even one of the two is DR3, then the person is at risk for celiac disease. But remember that around 25% of the entire population has DR3, too. If you are a celiac (or your husband), and your child has DR3, then the risk is something like 25%. We have a file on this called CEL-HLA on the main listserv...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/26/2007 - The results of a study recently published in the online science journal Nature Genetics have revealed a previously unknown genetic risk factor for celiac disease. An international team of researchers set out to study the genetic causes of intestinal inflammatory disorders. When the study began, it was well known that individuals with celiac disease have specific tissue types that identify wheat proteins. Why healthy individuals with the same tissue type failed to develop celiac symptoms or celiac disease remained unknown, and was a key question the team set out to answer. The team was led David van Heel, Professor of Gastrointestinal...

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 04/21/2010 - Due to the overwhelming number of ways celiac disease can manifest, it is often misdiagnosed by health care professionals. Celiac disease is also commonly diagnosed later in life, resulting in an  increase in celiac patient's morbidity and mortality. As such, it has been suggested that early screening of celiac disease is an effective way to eliminate misdiagnosis, and  can also minimize symptoms and complications that often manifest as a result of misdiagnosed or undiagnosed celiac disease. 
    To determine the cost effectiveness of early screening for celiac disease, a group of researchers at the Hadassah-Hebrew University Me...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/03/2014 - Spotting celiac disease early is important for optimal patient outcome. However, serological markers of celiac disease aren't much good for spotting mild histopathological lesions in adults at risk for celiac.
    A team of researchers recently set out to assess the usefulness of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2/8 genotyping, followed by duodenal biopsy for the detection of celiac disease in adult first-degree relatives (FDRs) of patients with celiac disease.
    The research team included L. Vaquero, A. Caminero, A. Nuñez, M. Hernando, C. Iglesias, J. Casqueiro, and S. Vivas. They are variously affiliated with the Gastroenterology ...