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  • Jefferson Adams

    Study Reviews Gluten Modification Efforts in Celiac Disease Therapies

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Photo: CC--mayo_clinic
    Caption: Photo: CC--mayo_clinic

    Celiac.com 03/31/2014 - Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals who carry the genetic markers HLA DQ2 or DQ8. About one in three people carry these genetic markers, while researchers estimate that the global prevalence of celiac disease is somewhere between one- and two-percent.

    Photo: CC--mayo_clinicA gluten-free diet remains the only treatment for celiac disease, but researchers are looking into new therapies aimed at gluten modification.



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    A team of researchers have reviewed a number of promising new celiac disease therapies aimed at gluten modification.

    The researchers include S. Stoven, J.A. Murray, and E. Marietta, of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

    Their review in Clinical Gastroenterology & Hepatology discusses gluten-based therapies including wheat alternatives and wheat selection, enzymatic alteration of wheat, oral enzyme supplements, and polymeric binders as exciting new therapies for treatment of celiac disease.

    Unfortunately, the full study is only available to subscribers, but anyone with the inclination to subscribe can read it online.

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    The article mentions that you must have the HLA DQ2 or DQ8 marker in order to potentially have celiac disease. Is that 100% always true or is there a population of people with celiac disease that don't have that genetic marker.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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