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Celiac Disease Increases Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2006;18:187-194.

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Celiac.com 04/10/2006 - According to findings by Dutch researchers, celiac disease increases the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma—but to a lower level than once believed. Past celiac disease studies have indicated that there is a 30 to 40-fold increased risk of enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma, however, Dr. M. Luisa Mearin and colleagues in The Netherlands investigated the frequency of celiac disease in two large European populations—one was a control group and the other was a group of non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients—and found that 1.2% of the non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients had celiac disease compared to 0.5% of the controls. After adjusting for age and sex differences between the two groups they found that celiac disease patients had a 2.6-fold increase risk of getting non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and this increased risk was only associated with patients who had been diagnosed prior to the study, and not in those with “silent” celiac disease which was found during the study. The odds of T-cell type small bowel lymphoma in celiac disease patients was estimated to be 28 times higher than for other localizations.

The researchers conclude that celiac disease patients have a significantly increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but the association is lower than previously thought. Celiac disease is mainly associated with T-cell small bowel lymphoma which is, in general, a rare condition.

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1 Response:

 
Della Austin
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10 Jan 2008 12:49:18 PM PST
Thank you for this latest news read, I have found it most interesting. I have always believed disease, or diseases, are triggered by the foods we ingest, and the chemicals our immune system are constantly being battered with. As a nurse, I have always been intrigued by the connection of disease, in regard to our diet ingested, or chemical exposure. Both me, and my husband have been doing our own research on Gluten, and what we have come up with is most disturbing, and I would like to share this at another date. This latest research does not surprise me in the least, in fact I was quite relieved, to discover that so much research is now being done on the connection to Gluten and other disease related conditions. Thank you for this wonderful and informative newsletter. Della Austin




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