21716 Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Share Common Genes - Celiac.com
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Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Share Common Genes

Celiac.com 12/12/2008 - For some time now scientists have been working to better understand the connection between celiac disease and diabetes.

About 10% of children and 2% of adults with Type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease, as compared to just 1% of the general population. Moreover, celiac disease and diabetes are known to have a common genetic susceptibility locus in the HLA system, specifically, HLA class II alleles on chromosome six.

The primary susceptibility genes for type-1 diabetes are HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DRB1, but they act in combination with non-immune system genes as well as environmental factors that are still undiscovered. Celiac disease also has a major susceptibility gene in the HLA system — HLA-DQB1 — as well as locations outside the HLA complex.

Recently, a research team led by John Todd, Ph.D., of the University of Cambridge, set out to better understand the connection between the two diseases, and to determine if they shared any non-HLA regions. They discovered another seven regions outside of the HLA system that are tied to both celiac disease and diabetes.

One of those regions is the 32-base pair insertion-deletion variant on chromosome three that leads to a non-functional CCR5 receptor on T cells. People who carry both pairs of these genes enjoy some protection against HIV infection, and its role in both celiac disease and diabetes indicates that lymphocytes are a key factor in both diseases. Carriers of these genes also face a greater risk of developing either celiac disease or diabetes, or both conditions in their lifetimes.

In genome-wide association studies, eight loci outside the HLA system have been associated with celiac disease. Similarly, 15 non-HLA loci have been linked with Type 1 diabetes.

Dr. Todd and colleagues genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)—single letter variations in the genetic code—in the eight celiac loci and in the 15 diabetes loci.

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They then screened DNA samples from 9,339 control subjects, 2,560 subjects with celiac disease, and 8,064 subjects with diabetes. They also tested the diabetic children, along with both biological parents in 2,828 families. The overall statistical significance was P<1.00×10−4.

At the same level of significance, three celiac disease locations—RGS1 on chromosome one, IL18RAP on chromosome two, and TAGAP on chromosome six—were also associated with Type 1 diabetes. The minor alleles of IL18RAP and TAGAP were associated with some protection from in Type 1 diabetes, but were associated with susceptibility in celiac disease.

The CCR5 variant on chromosome three was newly tied to Type 1 diabetes (at P=1.81×10−8) and was also tied with celiac disease, together with PTPN2 on chromosome 18 and CTLA4 on chromosome two. Counting SH2B3 on chromosome 12, which already known to be a shared locus—the number of non-HLA areas strongly tied to both celiac disease and diabetes stands at seven.

Dr. Todd and colleagues said it's possible that a common genetic background with respect to autoimmunity and inflammation—combined with disease-specific variation at HLA and non-HLA genes as well as non-genetic factors -- might lead to different clinical outcomes. It is possible that dietary exposure to gluten in the form of cereal grains might play a role in the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes.

These findings offer support a growing scientific view that many common diseases share genetic risk factors, and indicate that celiac and diabetes may in fact have common biological causes, and that the two disorders may be more closely linked than previously understood.

More research is needed to determine which shared risk factors might reveal previously unexpected biologic connections between diseases.

New England Journal of Medicine 2008; 359: 2767-77, 2837-2838

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1 Response:

 
Debbie Johnson
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said this on
17 Aug 2011 2:34:25 PM PDT
Yes! I'm so happy to see the research that has been done on this topic. I've heard from some people who've used my cookbook that there is a link between celiac disease and diabetes, and that some diabetics have improved greatly, even getting off insulin at times, with a gluten-free diet! Of course they still have to eat low-glycemic and that's a challenge with gluten-free.




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Well I took test for deficiencies today won't get the results till Tuesday then I can go from there.. road to recovery

Ask them for a copy of your results and find a good gastroenterologist in your area. Go there and give them the results. That's what I did. I didn't even bother with my GP. I got the results from the health fair and called a GI in Denver. My insurance didn't require a referral. My GI was the one who put me on the track to being accurately diagnosed. And regardless, you need to be hooked up with a good GI if you've got Celiac so that they can follow you.

Also, I had my bones checked a few months back (In January), and they were awesome. I'm still shocked at how well my body did with Celiac. I hear about all of my friends on here who had crazy horrible symptoms and I never did. I'm grateful. Because those ugly things would come eventually.

I work out regularly and I would say NO to working out if you have been glutened or are really tired. You know what happens to people who work out when they are really fatigued? They suffer injuries. I was not well enough to work out until I had been gluten free for 4 years but I am much older than you so I doubt it will take 4 years for you. Drop the work-outs for now and just go for walks outside when you feel better. The fatigue has to be better before you try to do gym work. I know you didn't want to hear that but I don't want you to end up injured, on top of everything else. Take care of yourself for now and let yourself heal!

They say you should not work out if your sick or dealing with such issues. I on the other hand do the opposite I will work out even if running a fever, I feel lost if I do not, and the endorphins help me feel fullfilled and relaxed......I have a few other issues as well >.> sitting still causes me to have mini panic attacks. I actually have to be on a stationary bike while on the computer lol. I swear it originates from being stuck in bed for days in the past unable to move, I fear being stuck unable to move my body like it used to sometimes. Got to admit the scariest thing in life is when your own body does not do what you want it to and it turns on you. As for steps, etc....I personally do about 24-30k steps a day or 11-14miles, Most of it pacing lol, anyway everyone is different so I can not tell you what to do just my own exp. Make sure you eat plenty, drink plenty of water and tea, and supplement anything your body might need. I eat constantly throughout the day to keep me going and enough protein and fats that it seems like a body building diet. Be careful and do not push yourself too hard, if you start feeling dizzy, tired or odd lay down for 15-20mins for a power nap. I do this twice a day at least just out of habit.