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Encouraging New Celiac Disease Drug

Celiac.com 03/12/2010 - According to the National Institutes of Health, approximately 3 million Americans suffer from celiac disease. Characterized by small intestinal inflammation, intestinal injury and intolerance to gluten, celiac is  a genetic T-cell mediated auto-immune disease. Those diagnosed with celiac disease know that the only cure is an entirely gluten-free diet for life.  When left untreated, celiac can manifest into life-threatening illnesses such as, heart disease, osteoporosis, and cancer. However, modern science is now presenting us with an alternative to suffering needlessly, and it comes in the shape of a little non-assuming pill called Larazotide Acetate.

While celiac disease affects 1 in 133 people, those numbers do not take into account the thousands of other people who are impacted from gluten intolerance and gluten related allergies. Gluten comes in many disguises but can be found primarily in wheat, rye, and barley. Since the Food and Drug Administration has not yet mandated gluten disclosures on labels, many foods are contaminated with hidden gluten. People that suffer from the inability to digest gluten are extremely limited when it comes to dining, and often find themselves eating alone or bringing their own gluten-free food to social events.

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Eating a microscopic amount of gluten, for many gluten sensitive sufferers,  frequently leads to varying degrees of sicknesses including, diarrhea, vomiting, rashes, and insomnia. Some people are more sensitive than others, and those most sensitive to gluten cannot eat at many restaurants due to the chance of cross contamination. Much like a peanut allergy, those gluten sensitive can  get sick from eating gluten-free food that was cooked in the same kitchen as gluten food by means of contamination, or simply from receiving a kiss from a loved one that has traces of gluten on their mouth.

With so many unsavory reactions to food, the medical community has been attempting to devise a drug for celiacs that allows them to safely digest gluten. A new drug called Larazotide Acetate, has been called 'revolutionary' to the celiac and gluten sensitive community, and may be what celiacs need to live a more normal life. While it is not a cure, Larazotide Acetate has been proven in clinical trials to greatly reduce the negative reactions celiacs have with gluten. Clinical test patients displayed a decrease  in  intestinal damage, from 50% to 15%, when ingesting gluten after taking Larazotide Acetate.

Larazotide Acetate may very well be the new breakthrough drug of the decade. It offers celiacs and others with gluten sensitivities, the freedom to eat out at restaurants, or go to a friends house for dinner without the physiological and emotional stress that can accrue from worrying about, and getting sick from gluten contaminated food.

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8 Responses:

 
Heather
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
01 Apr 2010 12:39:24 AM PDT
I heard about these trials last year (for Larazotide Acetate) and checked out the actual clinical trial site. Well, the disturbing fact about the trials are that ALL the participants were REQUIRED to adhere to a gluten free diet to begin with. Now how do they know the drug itself is actually working if the participants are already gluten free? Wouldn't they already be decreasing the damage to their intestines by being gf alone?! It would automatically throw the testing results off. I wrote and confronted the doctors about this and heard nothing back from them. I'm sure they wished that no one would bring that fact up, which is why my email was left unanswered. I found the trial to be faulty and untrustworthy by that alone.

 
Robert
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
01 Apr 2010 4:56:59 PM PDT
I gather that the reason for the gluten free diet is that they try and get the 'test subject' as healthy as possible and then try and test the effects of gluten on them. Think about your comments for a moment will you?
If you know much about coeliac disease then you should know that the damage occurs very quickly with a very small exposure and takes 3 to 6 months in an adult to repair.

What would be the point of having a damaged person take the drug - its not a cure - just a potential way of blocking some of the reaction to gluten (which is a pretty good start if you ask me).

 
Brian
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said this on
02 Feb 2013 5:11:51 AM PDT
Couldn't agree more Robert. I think she miss understands the reason for the pill. I'm sure if she thought it through it would make sense.

 
Marc
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said this on
08 Aug 2011 11:39:11 AM PDT
Can't wait for this to come on the market. I don't mind eating gluten free (my 9 year old celiac daughter is having a harder time). I just see the drug as a fail safe for cross -contamination and such rather than a cure. I hope it's out soon!

 
Barrett
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said this on
21 Nov 2011 2:00:10 PM PDT
I'd prefer some research on the other problems that come with having a destroyed small intestine. They are many but few have been researched. I was diagnosed with "ovarian failure" 6 years before I was diagnosed with celiac disease. Too late for me to conceive now.
How about some research on celiac intestines and hormones? I think that would be more important than being able to eat pizza again.

 
M-E
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said this on
23 Jan 2012 11:53:39 AM PDT
Yes they are testing a drug to block Zonulin which MAY be responsible for the damage in the small intestines. But look up the research - the researchers admit they don't know how it all works yet and they want to make a drug that will block this protein. A reduction of 50% to 15% damage is still DAMAGE! I am sorry but this will not work...when are we going to wake up from this perception that a stupid pill will fix everything - it doesn't! I agree it can be hard sometimes when you go out to eat and I had to learn to cook differently - But I also learned a lot about good nutrition and lets face it the whole population consumes too much wheat!

Think about this - the body makes Zonulin for a reason but people with CD make too much - so they want to totally block it - does that sound like a good idea?

 
Joan
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said this on
07 Jun 2012 3:27:22 PM PDT
If this drug is just going to reduce reactions to gluten, yet you are still putting gluten into your body and you are allergic to it, how is this going to help? It seems to me that you will still be damaging your body but you won't get the reactions.

 
ali asghar fozouni
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
08 Aug 2012 8:54:34 AM PDT
I'm from Iran. I am 38 years old and I have celiac disease. Would you please help me and show me the drugs treatment?




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And this from Consumer Reports: http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2012/11/arsenic-in-your-food/index.htm Rice aside, stop giving your kids apple juice too as it can contain high levels of arsenic too! Eat real apples -- not juice.

If I am in a bar and it is super busy, I ask for a "to go" cup. Why? If a dishwasher is not being used (or demand is overwhelming it), bartenders are cleaning all the glasses the old fashioned way ( sinks, wash and rinse with disinfectant). Good for killing bacteria I suppose, but maybe not for removing gluten traces. No bar is going to slow down drink orders ($$$$$) to wait for clean glasses from the dishwasher! Is this all true? I can not say. I am just speaking from experience when I was barmaid 30 years ago before there were dedicated bar dishwashers. http://www.servicethatsells.com/blog/how-to-clean-a-beer-glass/ Even if this is "all in my head", I feel better clutching my "to go" cup and can relax. ?

Check out this page and the advice on rice prep: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/2F1MDzyW55pg97Tdpp7gqLN/should-i-be-concerned-about-arsenic-in-my-rice

Hi Rachel and welcome I think you've found the single best site on the web for help and advice. Hope it's of use to you. I tested negative for celiac so no referral. My experience with NHS however suggests it could be worth phoning your Gastro's office and asking the admin staff there to check on this. Things get overlooked... I would avoid anything with those warnings on. It's a pain in the arse because, for example, it recently appeared on a brand of nuts I like. However having some experience of production and marketing environments that warning will only be going on the pack if someone in the company thinks there's a chance of contamination. There's always other products to choose from so I don't take the chance. Walkers crisps have given me a reaction, yes even the sodding ready salted ones It's something to do with their production processes. I think Gary Lineker may dance through the factory each week spreading handfuls of flour for good luck. Whatever, I now avoid them. My energy levels improved over a few months after the diet. It took longer the second time after my challenge. I was still noticing improvements / weird resolutions of odd symptoms up to 9 months to a year later... Lots of good advice here: All the best! Matt

Ah.... Settles back, dons funny hat, smokes pipe, plays violin, injects heroin etc... I think you need to treat yourself as your own science experiment. If you're ok at home with all of the drinks then you can almost certainly rule out alcohol intolerance and thank your bodies burgeoning super coeliac powers of gluten detection for the reaction. Clearly your powers have grown in the past five years young jedi... In which case maybe there's a drink you can order which would reduce this risk, maybe asking for the bottle and a clean glass, forgoing ice, straws etc, anything to simplify matters and reduce the number of contaminant variables. One thing I'd avoid would be 'mixers' from the shared line. Not because there's gluten filled drinks going through them, typically its just coke, lemonade and soda water, but because the nozzle sometimes dips into the drink that's being filled. Paranoid? Maybe, but I avoid them now and pay the extra for a bottle. A word on glasses. Most bars have a dedicated glass washer and they're good, to a point. I've worked behind a bar in the past and the washers are only on for a very short time, they can run up to 35 times an hour... I've seen lipstick on glasses from them and whilst the chances of contamination are probably slight... Now if you're out for a night at different places, it will be very hard to work out where its happening. So my suggestion is to go out to one bar only and pick a decent one. Speak to a bartender or manager, explain to them just what a special snowflake you are and get one definitely clean glass at the outset then keep it for the evening and just get it refilled. Pick one drink only and stick to it. I'd suggest wine as maybe its easier on the stomach than the bubbly prosecco and you can get the little bottles without any chance of contamination but that may be nonsense See what happens... If you're ok, then you have an answer. You've become more sensitive and your reacting to trace gluten. *removes funny hat, discards pipe, hides syringe...