No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Celiac Disease and Zinc Deficiency


Gluten-Free Diet and Zinc (photo courtesy of Rudner)

Celiac.com 04/28/2010 - Celiac disease primarily impacts the proximal small intestine, and the small intestine is fundamental  in maintaining zinc equilibrium within the body. Recently, zinc has been acknowledged for it's importance in upholding the integrity of intestinal mucosa, immunity and proper growth rates in children. Base-line plasma zinc levels are shown to be greatly reduced in over two-thirds of children diagnosed with celiac disease.

A study was conducted by the Celiac Disease Clinic in the division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Post Graduate Institute Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India  between July 2006 and December 2007, to evaluate plasma levels of zinc in children with celiac disease, correlate plasma zinc levels among celiacs short in stature and with diarrhea, and to compare plasma zinc levels in deficient patients on a gluten-free diet with zinc supplementation, to patients on a gluten-free diet without zinc supplementation.

Ads by Google:

134 total patients less than 14 years old and newly diagnosed with celiac disease, were enrolled for the study. Each subject enrolled was also evaluated for baseline demographics and social profiles which included an in-depth medical history, physical examination, and thorough blood work. All patients included in the study were placed on a gluten-free diet and  received dietary counseling from a physician and experienced dietitian.

All patients received a 20 milligram dose of elemental zinc supplementation for 4 weeks.  Plasma zinc levels were compared at baseline and also at 4 weeks to determine zinc deficiency. Patients found to be deficient in zinc levels were randomly divided into two  groups, Group G and Group G+Z. Group G treatments included a gluten-free diet without zinc supplementation. Group G+Z received a gluten-free diet with zinc supplementation. 

The results of this study showed that plasma zinc levels had a significant rise in Group G and Group G+Z regardless of zinc supplementation. However, a gluten-free diet alone showed a profound increase in plasma zinc levels, even when compared to gluten-free diet with zinc supplements; thereby indicating that zinc supplementation combined with  a gluten-free diet gives no additional benefits to plasma zinc levels. In fact,  all celiac patients that maintained  a gluten-free diet for this study showed that their ability to absorb zinc had significantly improved. Therefore, it can be concluded that zinc levels rise with a gluten-free diet regardless of zinc supplementation,  proving that a  completely gluten-free diet is the cure to poor zinc absorption in celiac patients.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



2 Responses:

 
Mark
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
24 Nov 2010 7:41:13 PM PDT
The article does not tell us which kind of zinc was used. Also, it does not mention a control group of non-celiacs on zinc supplementation. It doesn't tell us the gluten-free celiac's zinc levels compared with non-celiac's. Anyway, if zinc oxide, zinc carbonate or certain other kinds of zinc were used, it's no wonder there was no difference between those taking the supplements and those not—according to the 1998 study cited on the Wikipedia article, they would yield about the same results for non-celiacs. Zinc picolinate, zinc acetate and zinc gluconate have been shown to be more effective, although zinc picolinate is probably the most effective. Anyway, the article is interesting still; just realize it's not the final answer without more information and/or study.

 
Carlos
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
28 Dec 2011 9:58:55 PM PDT
I only use zinc supplementation when I accidentally ingest gluten. I can smell the zinc (very strong metal odor) in the urine after I ingest gluten. That is my body's first warning of gluten (and last line of defense before symptoms). I then take zinc to replenish my zinc levels. If I don't supplement and eat gluten again, my symptoms will break out.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

Me too. I had numerous chest x rays as I couldnt shake colds off and they always progressed on to my chest. Barely happens since my diet change

You make a good point i'll be sure to watch out. My mom is coming with me shes not gluten free I'll have her try the stuff that may be contaminated and tell me how it is :b hahah

I have been thinking that I need to change my diet and this article has only confirmed it. I eat quite a lot of gluten-free 'treats' at the moment, cakes, chocolate etc. I rationalise by the fact I dont drink or smoke and have a restricted choice so I 'deserve' a break, but I guess my choices are leading in a bad direction. Maybe I'll have a go at making some better choices...

Love reading this story as it is rare (I think) to find someone else with the swallowing issues! Hate that this is your experience however! My daughter also has the swallowing issues and it got so severe (we had no idea about Celiac) that she had to do intensive therapy to learn how to swallow again. It got better but never resolved. Once she went gluten-free it got way better though a recent exposure to oats caused it to flare up again. Do you mind me asking - Has your swallowing issues 100% resolved being gluten-free? Does it ever actually go away and stay away or will it always pop up from time to time?

I will say what everyone else says and get tested again with the endoscope and biopsy to confirm, you will need to be on gluten for 12 weeks for blood test 2 weeks for endoscope at least a slice of bead a day. The thing about celiac is many symptoms can be quite minor, hell even before I had my MAJOR symptoms show I had some of the other issues show up in my every day life and I just thought it was normal. Regardless if you keep eating gluten with celiac disease it will slowly eat away at your body internally til it does become a problem. Celiac is a autoimmune disease that reacts to the gluten proteins, and has misdirected attacks on your own body internally by mistake trying to kill the gluten. Now the damage can lead to all kinds of other auto immune diseases, random allergies, food intolerance, and even cancer. I suggest if you do have it, stay on the gluten-free diet, your just basically changing brands there are many gluten-free food versions of everything now days. Be thankful you got this early, I developed issues with dairy, corn, peanuts, and a whole list of others along with another autoimmune disease Ulcerative Colitis that makes it so I can not eat sugars or carbs or my intestines swell. Getting on a gluten-free diet before your damage progresses will not only keep you healthier for longer, and let you live a pretty normal life but also save you from this pain and very limited diet if the damage progresses too much. As to your fatigue, you changed over to gluten-free diet, you stopped eating a bunch of the Fortified foods, and depending on the route you took of either whole foods ore more processed foods. You could be eating to many empty carbs, starches, and not enough nutrients. OR if you took the whole foods approach you be lacking in your daily calorie intake or not the right ratio of nutrients. You might have to supplement a few of them.