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Risk of Fracture in Celiac Disease: Gender, Dietary Compliance, or Both?

Celiac.com 11/23/2011 - Osteopenia and osteoporosis, both conditions in which bone density is less than optimal, are often seen in people with celiac disease at the time of their diagnosis. There have been conflicting data as to whether a gluten free diet can improve bone density. Researchers in Argentina set out to determine if celiac patients suffer more peripheral fractures than a control population, and to assess the effects of a gluten free diet on fracture risk. Their results are reported in the July 7, 2011 issue of the World Journal of Gastroenterology.

Photo: CC - sebastianjtThey recruited 256 people who had been diagnosed with celiac at least five years before the study began in March, 2007, asked them if they had ever broken any bones and, if so, which. They then compared their answers to answers obtained from 530 age- and sex- matched controls with functional gastrointestinal disorders. People with other disorders that could reduce bone health – like thyroid dysfunction, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and diabetes – as well as those taking vitamin D, steroids, calcium supplements or other medications that could affect bone metabolism were excluded.

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They found that celiacs had a higher rate and risk of first peripheral fracture before diagnosis – but this effect only achieved statistical significance for men. This increased risk was also associated with a classical clinical presentation; those with atypical or silent forms of celiac did not exhibit the same risk. Although the finding that being male increases a celiac’s risk of peripheral fractures is intriguing, it must be borne out by larger studies – only 42 of the 256 celiacs included in this study were male. After maintaining a gluten free diet for five years, the elevated risk of fractures was gone.

The authors speculate that eliminating gluten may reduce the risk of fractures in celiac patients not necessarily by increasing bone mass and mineral density, but by improving body mass and fat/ muscle composition, nutritional status, and bone architecture.

Despite its limited scope, the take home message of this study is clear; if you have celiac disease, strictly adhering to a gluten free diet is good not just for your intestines, immune system, and skin; it is also good for your bones.

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1 Response:

 
vivienne harris
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said this on
28 Nov 2011 7:02:14 PM PDT
This is good to know.




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Thanks for letting me know. My back hurts all the time

I had a pillcam done two and a half months after I went gluten-free and it only showed gastropathy. three and a half months before the pillcam and endoscopy showed damage consistent with celiac. That damage was after a 10 or 11 week gluten challenge. prior to that I was gluten-free for a ...

It works much better for me but everyone is different. I have a physical job and sometimes get lower back pain. A hot shower and an Aleve will usually relieve it. It's worth your giving it a try.

Is Aleve better than ibuprofen? My back pain doesn't budge with 800 mg Motrin.

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