23434 Are Gluten and Dairy Physically Addictive? - Celiac.com
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Are Gluten and Dairy Physically Addictive?

Celiac.com 11/01/2013 - Dairy and gluten contain "opioid peptides," that belong to the same family as opium. Dairy products contain small amounts of casomorphin, while gluten contains small amounts of gluten exorphin, and gliadorphin/gluteomorphin.

Photo: CC--JM3When peptides from either gluten or casein react with opiate receptors in the brain, they produce effects similar to opiate drugs, such as heroin and morphine, albeit on a much more subtle level.

These receptors influence the part of the brain involved with speech and auditory integration, which means this part of the brain can cause addiction to foods, spacing out or having foggy brain, migraines/headaches, sleepiness, chronic fatigue, aggressive behavior, moodiness, anxiety, depression, and high tolerance to pain.

Little research exists on the potentially addictive qualities of gluten and dairy. However, there is plenty of research to back up how a gluten-free and casein-free diet can help improve those who suffer from ADHD, depression, anxiety, OCD, schizophrenia and Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Many people first beginning a gluten-free and casein-free diet experience withdrawal symptoms, many experience powerful cravings. People can get cranky and irritable, and even pick fights and throw tantrums.

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How do you know if you might be sensitive to gluten or casein?

Signs that you might be having a reaction to gluten or casein include abnormal bowel movements, either constipated or poorly formed; headaches; aggressive behavior, such as biting, hitting, pushing; inability to focus at school; erratic sleep or rising early -- before 6 a.m.

Also, if your diet is heavily wheat and dairy based, as many are, it can take up to three weeks to fully be rid of gluten and casein with no reactions.

If you think you or your child might have an allergy to gluten or casein, you should consider visiting a doctor for an IgG food allergy blood panel to see if that really is the problem. Blood tests are not 100 percent conclusive, but still a good measure.
If you're still not sure, then ditch all the gluten and dairy in the house, and try a 30-day elimination diet should help return to normal.

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1 Response:

 
Hilary
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
05 Nov 2013 1:27:06 AM PDT
That's interesting. Where did the research come from for that?
As usual Jefferson you come up with something thought provoking. Thanks again.




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George, i am sorry that you are not feeling well! ?? I am not a doctor, but just trying out drugs to stop your symptoms just seems like a band aid approach. It sounds like he suspects IBS which is really, in my opinion, "I be stumped". Has inflammatory bowel disorder (IBD) (more lovely autoimmune disorders) been ruled out? This includes both Crohn's and Colitis. My niece was diagnosed with Crohn's finally with a pill camera after all other tests were given. The damage was not within reach of any scope. I am just throwing out suggestions. Hopefully, you and your doctor will figure it out soon!

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease that happens to have a known trigger -- gluten. Flare-ups develop (antibodies) causing damage. Not just in the small intestine, but systemically. One gluten exposure can cause antibodies to increase for days or months! Antibodies are being measured during the celiac blood tests. If there is no gluten exposure, there will be no antibodies. These antibodies can come down in some people in as little as two weeks. Recommendations require gluten 2 to 4 weeks daily for the biopsies taken via endoscopy in order to be sure to catch damage, but 8 to 12 weeks for the blood tests. The endoscopy is considered the "gold standard" in helping to diagnose celiac disease, but there are other things that can damage the small intestine. So, the blood test helps solidify the diagnosis. So, if you want a good result on your endoscopy, you need to be eating gluten daily for two week prior at a minimum. I know it is tough and you are feeling sick. Wish there was a better way to catch active celiac disease.

Hi everyone, Just an update to my situation. I had thought that I might be getting better since I started adding gluten-free grain back into my diet but I was wrong. It seems that the Methscopalamine Bromide just delayed the effects, didn't stop them. I had to stop taking it because one of the side effects is to stop sweating, which I did. There were times when I felt hot and almost couldn't catch my breath. Anyway, my doc put me on Viberzi instead. I took 3 doses, 1 Tuesday evening and then 1 Wednesday morning and then again Wednesday evening. Each time I took 1, it seemed that about half an hour later I would develop severe abdominal cramping, pain in my neck, shoulders and upper back and a feeling like my insides were on fire. My face felt like it was hot and tingling. It wasn't warm to the touch but felt like it to me. Worse of all is it didn't work anyway, I still had diarrhea. I stopped taking Viberzi after reading the precautions pamphlet which said, "stop taking Viberzi and tell your doctor if you have abdominal cramping, pain which radiates to your shoulders or upper back." Go figure. Anyway, today is 3 weeks straight of diarrhea and still no diagnosis and not sure what he's going to want to do next. George

I'm still really new to all this but is it common to have trouble with sleep? I swear since my symptoms got really bad a few months ago I can't get 1 good nights sleep, like a 5 hour stretch is doing real good. Wake up at 3am wide awake almost every night. Told my doctor and they've recommended melatonin, that doesn't work. Tried chamomile and lavender tea, no help. Tried zzquil, that will knock me out but maybe for like an extra hour then I'm really drowsy the next morning from it. I don't know what to do.

I have 2 copies of DQ9. One from each parent.