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Did Japan's ANA Airlines Really Give a Single Banana as a Gluten-free Meal?


Image: CC--yamaguchi yoshiaki

Celiac.com 05/04/2017 - Japan's ANA airline is catching some public relations heat this week after reports that a man flying from Tokyo to Australia received a banana instead of the gluten-free meal that he booked in advance.

London resident, and celiac disease sufferer, Martin Pavelka flew All Nippon Airways flight from Tokyo this week, a nine-hour flight.

Numerous media have reported Mr. Pavelka's plights in glaring terms, such as the Independent's alarming headline: Man Given Banana as Gluten-free "Meal" on Nine hour Flight, with the equally sensational sidebar: Londoner flying from Tokyo to Sydney was handed a banana as the gluten-free inflight "meal." However, a closer reading shows those claims to be pretty misleading.

The fact is that Mr. Pavelka did receive his specially-ordered gluten-free meal at dinner, shortly after departure. The banana was part of the breakfast meal, the second meal service for the flight, which is where the trouble began for Mr Pavelka, who said he was "expecting something more substantial."

"All other passengers were served full breakfast meal consisting of eggs, sausage, mushrooms, bread, and yogurt," Pavelka told the Standard, while all he received was a single banana," which though "definitely gluten free…did not keep me full for very long."

So, let's add this all up. On a nine-hour flight, Mr. Pavelka received his special gluten-free meal for dinner, and then about 5 hours later, about 2 hours or so before landing, he received a banana in lieu of a full breakfast? But he wanted more? And this is a new story?

In the account given by the Standard, Mr. Pavelka's first words to the flight attendant were "is this some kind of joke?" Not exactly diplomatic language. Nor, by the Standard's account did Mr. Pavelka ask for anything more, such as a yogurt, or additional fruit?

Clearly Mr. Pavelka received less food at breakfast than the other passengers, but the food was gluten-free, as was his earlier dinner. It's entirely reasonable for Mr. Pavelka to expect to be treated like the other passengers, and to receive more for breakfast.

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However, without more detail, it's hard to know exactly what ANA offered at the time of booking, or whether there was some kind of mix-up with the caterers who provide meals, including specialty meals, to ANA. Do we know for sure that ANA actually offered a full gluten-free breakfast on that flight? Or that Mr. Pavelka was promised one? That said, both Mr. Pavelka and the newspapers covering the story owe it to the public to be more clear and less sensational about the actual facts. Expecting two gluten-free meals, and receiving one gluten-free meal and a banana is a very different story than just receiving a banana.

Reports that the banana was the only gluten-free food ANA provided Mr. Pavelka for the entire nine-hour flight are simply wrong. ANA in fact provided Mr. Pavelka with a gluten-free dinner. The Standard managed to bury that important detail in paragraph ten of an eighteen paragraph article, while the Independent slipped it into paragraph seven of a thirteen paragraph article. Both papers carefully avoid mentioning the fact that the dinner was gluten-free.

The paragraph in the Standard reads: "Although he had been given a larger meal the previous evening when his flight left, Mr Pavelka said he was expecting something more substantial for breakfast."

Yet, somehow, the Standard published the story under the fact-mashed title, "Londoner who ordered gluten free meal on nine-hour flight is given a single banana to eat with knife and fork."

Both the newspapers and Mr. Pavelka seem focused on spinning a story that the banana was the only food ANA provided Mr. Pavelka during the flight, which was simply not the case.

Such obfuscation, presumably in search of readership, does little to provide clarity on the actual details, and much to cause doubt and confusion about what are actually fairly simple, if inconvenient, facts to a fairly mundane, and not-altogether newsworthy, story.

If Mr. Pavelka received only a banana for his nine-hour flight, that would truly be an outrage. If he received a gluten-free meal, plus a banana, that would be an inconvenience. The story was presented as an outrage, when the facts indicated it was clearly more of an inconvenience.

This article was revised for clarity by the author on 5/10/2017.

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37 Responses:

 
Robyn
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
07 May 2017 11:13:15 AM PST
That actually IS a big deal. He WAS given a banana instead of a meal, which is ridiculous. Sir, one banana is NOT a meal! Surely they could have at least boiled a couple of eggs and some form of gluten free cereal or yogurt. Breakfast, more than any other meal, needs to provide a hefty serving of protein. Many sufferers of Celiac have sugar control issues or other problems because of their autoimmune state. Never being guaranteed a safe food source is frightening, as this can lead not only to discomfort, but sudden drops in sodium or blood sugar, resulting in physical weakness, trembling, unsteadiness, panic and emotional meltdown. Not only was this passenger in need of a meal at the expected time, but even if he landed an hour later, he had no guarantee of substantial available sustenance. Packs of nuts and berries in ones pocket does not truly energize and satisfy, especially if one has not had sufficient nutrition when needed. If you claim to be Celiac yourself and write an article​ this lacking in solid research and compassion for the people who struggle with it 24/7, I must call you out. If you do not have celiac, it's obvious you are in no way qualified to "report on" something you are so ignorant of and so calloused about. As for the airline... it's not as if they had no chance to prepare. It's the job of those responsible for preparing food to always be prepared to meet the dietary needs of passengers with known handicaps unless they require tube feeding or some medical intervention in their feeding process. An American or European company who pulled a trick like this would be in violation of their nations laws. As backwards as the US is about things like this, even we finally have some legal standards set in this area.

 
Jefferson Adams
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said this on
10 May 2017 1:39:44 PM PST
I have tremendous empathy for the struggle faced by people with celiac disease in trying to eat gluten-free food outside of the home, especially when it comes to travel. When I initially read the headlines and first looked at news accounts of these incidents, I, too was offended. I thought it was outrageous that a passenger on a nine-hour flight would be given nothing more than a banana to eat. However, on closer inspection, it became clear that the news accounts, especially the headlines, were misleading. The passenger requested, and received a gluten-free meal. He expected more than a banana for breakfast, and I don't think he's wrong to feel that way. However, given that he had a full dinner, his banana for breakfast was more of an inconvenience than the outrage it was being portrayed as. I feel that accuracy serves everyone better than sensationalism, including people with celiac disease.

 
K2
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said this on
08 May 2017 11:06:11 AM PST
It wasn't anything. Ok, the headline was misleading. But only a banana for breakfast is ludicrous and deserves to be called out. Yes, he was given a GF dinner but humans need feeding at regular intervals - especially over a 9 hour time span. OTOH, this is why most Celiac veterans will advise you to never travel without taking your own snack stash along. A GF granola bar may not be ideal but it would have made that banana go farther.

 
Mary
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said this on
08 May 2017 1:21:05 PM PST
I just read an article that said ANA was reviewing their gluten-free meals, so some good my come out of this bad experience.

 
JasonF
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said this on
08 May 2017 1:47:17 PM PST
Fly Qantas or SingaporeAir and you realize how bad the GF "meals" on US and Japanese airlines really are...inedible steamed fish anyone?

 
Helen Vajk
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said this on
08 May 2017 3:07:09 PM PST
At least he did not get the wrong food. A few years back flying 14 hours on Lufthansa SFO to Dubai (and on to parts beyond), I was given a gluten-free, safe but taste-free dinner, labeled GF. However for breakfast I was given a tray with buns looking like the other passengers', and on asking the steward was very sneeringly told that "We don't do special meals for breakfast." I explained that I was still specially a celiac in the morning too, and handed the tray back. Honestly, his voice was so rude that several passengers around me applauded. But what if I'd trusted the airlines? And last week on Avianca they did not provide a GF meal in spite of an advance order. Be vigilant.

 
Rick
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said this on
08 May 2017 3:32:25 PM PST
THANK YOU Robyn for you comment. Tell us again Jefferson, who's side are you actually on again??!! And since 75% of my replies and comments never get published I am not expecting you to post this one either, since everything has to be censored and approved! Even though this may not get published, I still know you or someone else is reading this along with all my other posts that never seemed to make it to the comment section. You're supposed to be an advocate and voice for those of us with celiac and this is ANYTHING BUT!

 
Jefferson Adams
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said this on
10 May 2017 12:57:01 PM PST
I'm on the side of accuracy and facts. Several news agencies attempted to spin this as some horrible outrage, in which a man on a nine-hour flight was given a banana as his gluten-free meal. That's only true if you forget the actual gluten-free meal that they served him. The man was expecting two gluten-free meals. He received one gluten-free meal for dinner, and a banana for breakfast. Inconvenient, yes, and perhaps bad customer service, but hardly the outrage that is being presented.

 
John
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said this on
08 May 2017 7:20:01 PM PST
Clearly the articles could have been more accurate. But to the question posed by the article "Did Japan´s ANA Airlines Really Give a Single Banana as a Gluten-free Meal?" the answer is clearly yes they did. And, no, that is not acceptable. I'm disappointed in the tone of the article implying that providing that same level of food to a celiac as to other passengers is somehow acceptable. Presumably the author of this article does not have celiac disease and is unaware of the damage articles like this can do. The fact this article was published on Celiac.com is even more disappointing. Celiacs have major food restrictions which are not granted protection as a handicap or on religious grounds. To state that a token effort is all that is require to meet the gluten-free medical requirements of celiacs is an unacceptable stand for the Celiac.com website to take.

 
Jefferson Adams
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said this on
10 May 2017 1:48:12 PM PST
You are correct about the answer to the headline question. However, my issue with the news accounts of this story was their effort to spin this as some terrible outrage in which a passenger got nothing more than a banana on a nine-hour flight. That is simply not the case. The airline clearly attempted to accommodate the passenger by providing a full gluten-free meal for dinner, in addition to the banana he received for breakfast. That fact is not made clear in any media account. There's a huge difference between the story presented in the news headlines, and the actual facts contained in the articles and the man's own statements. When one considers that actual facts, the story becomes one about inconvenience, rather than justifiable outrage.

 
Jane
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said this on
08 May 2017 7:26:23 PM PST
I agree with Mr. Adams that the story had been overblown and sensationalized but I also agree that a banana alone for breakfast is problematic. I really don't feel that castigating the author and accusing him of being unaware of the realities of CD is appropriate or fair. Having said that, probably not one of your strongest articles, Jeff. I flew from NY to England in 2015 and got the same thing. I was provided a pretty substantial GF dinner (for an airline meal) but the banana for breakfast was a tad disappointing. Other passengers had these large brioche rolls or croissants with cheese. I had the banana with a granola bar I had on me and it was more than adequate to get me through customs, after which I went out and found a GF full English breakfast. I agree with Mr. Adams that the story was sensationalized but a banana alone truly isn't adequate when other passengers are given protein in addition to carbs for a meal. Why the airlines don't give people a choice of a hard boiled egg or yogurt (and, yes, even then there will be folks who can't eat either of those choices) is beyond me. Add a banana or other fruit and that should see most people through for a couple of hours. We were given breakfast about two hours, maybe a little less, before landing. Why this gentleman didn't think to pack some safe snacks is also beyond me. Lots of people are not thrilled with the food on airlines and think to bring something with them -- with or without celiac. I've been dealing with a GF diet since 1989 (good luck getting a GF meal back then -- on or off an airplane!) and even now I still carry a couple of bars in my handbag. Just in case.

 
mary
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said this on
08 May 2017 7:29:25 PM PST
Good article, and one that bears attention. Some years ago, and I do say some years ago, I was promised repeatedly by Alaska Airlines that they would provide me a wonderful GF meal. I trusted them. when we were on the plane and it was too late for me to go grab - anything! That I might be able to eat, the stewards discovered that my GF meal was the same meal as everyone else's - smothered in gravy, biscuits, no indication that it was not the same meal as everyone else's. the much embarrassed and very kind flight attendants stole the carrot sticks off everyone else's trays and that was my meal. A tray full of carrot sticks. I have never trusted again. A few years ago, Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle repeatedly promised me a GF meal for a hospice seminar. I took my lunch just in case. the meal they provided for everyone else was choice of a several huge baguette sandwiches, choice of mac or potato or green salads (choice of dressing), and beverage of their choice = juice, milk, pop, coffee, myGF lunch was a very small green salad with no dressing, a 1/4 cup of mixed fruit cocktail and a bottle water. the RN I worked with took one look and said, "well, that may be GF, but it's not lunch. I always bring my own food. BTW, I am not a robot; I tried to select around the street signs, but all that was selected was a line from one street sign to another.

 
Wolf T.
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said this on
09 May 2017 1:25:11 AM PST
A banana is not a meal. No matter how you surround it with words, at the end (or beginning) of the day, a banana is not a meal. No matter what the passenger did or did not do, it remains: a banana is not a meal. He ordered a meal and received a banana. I daresay that if you paid for a meal in a restaurant and received a banana, you'd be venting your outrage in an article. Likely you'd say, a banana is not a meal. I grant that the stories were not accurate, but why continue this streak of inaccuracy by claiming that it's not a big deal? Reverse the roles: you are on a 9 hour flight and after eating dinner you awake to a breakfast of a banana. All around you passengers are eating three sources of protein - eggs, sausage and yogurt. You are given a banana. As has been said, eggs can be served boiled. Gluten free sausage is not hard to find; neither is gluten free yogurt. No matter how you spin it, a banana is not a meal. That's the bottom line. A banana is not a meal.

 
Jefferson Adams
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said this on
10 May 2017 1:59:34 PM PST
A banana may not be a meal, but it is gluten-free. What many people seem to miss here is that the airline clearly attempted, perhaps poorly, to accommodate this passenger with a full gluten-free dinner (which the man and every article conveniently glosses over), and a gluten-free option for breakfast. Without being privy to the fine-print on the man´s ticket, or the company's website, or knowing what may have transpired in catering, it's difficult to know if his options included a full gluten-free meal at breakfast. That said, the airline probably can, and should, do more for their gluten-free passengers. My issue was with this story being presented as some poor guy who only got a single banana for a nine-hour flight, rather than being presented as a story about a guy who got a gluten-free dinner and expected and wanted something more than a banana for breakfast.

 
Kathryn Sparks
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said this on
09 May 2017 1:30:14 AM PST
I was on an Emarites flight from Orlando to Dubai then Manila. I pre-ordered my gluten free meals. I did get them, except when they gave my breakfast meal to my boyfriend. It clearly had my name on it but we had switched seats. The night before they gave me the meal even though we were in switched seats. They were very sorry and I was given a meal that I had to decide if it had gluten in it or not. On the return flight they were giving out snacks of pizza. I was given one but told them I couldn't have that, it not gluten free. She didn't know what to do and went back to the galley. I was brought a banana, a pear and an apple. All gluten free, of course! This was a very long flight so I had brought some gluten free things to eat with me, just in case. All my other meals were fine.

 
Jefferson Adams
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said this on
10 May 2017 2:32:19 PM PST
Thanks for your comment. I think we often spend a great deal of time pointing out what airlines do wrong, and very little time pointing out what they do right. In this case, they actually fed him a full gluten-free dinner a few hours before. Without knowing more about what their gluten-free breakfast options really are, it´s hard to know if they this is standard gluten-free breakfast on that ANA flight, or simply the airline doing their best in a pinch. I feel that many are quick to assume the former, rather than the latter.

 
Sueps
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
09 May 2017 3:21:58 AM PST
As others say, he was entitled to a proper breakfast like everyone else. The silly thing is he could probably have had most of what the others had for breakfast anyway!

 
Jefferson Adams
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said this on
10 May 2017 2:09:41 PM PST
Agreed. However, there's no indication that the man asked for yogurt, or any other food. I'm pretty sure ANA would have accommodated such a request, if possible.

 
Bozena Benton
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said this on
09 May 2017 4:37:31 AM PST
I would have been happy with a banana. I travel both short and long haul and have used many airlines. My problem or rather it is the airline's problem is that I need not only a gluten-free meal but a vegetarian one. No airline can cope with this dietary combination so I never get a meal on any flight and have to take my own. I would welcome a fruit platter or any fruit but this seems to be beyond most airlines lateral thinking.

 
Linda
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said this on
09 May 2017 6:08:03 AM PST
I am appalled by this article.

 
Jefferson Adams
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said this on
10 May 2017 2:06:46 PM PST
That is your prerogative. I was appalled by the way a rather mundane inconvenience was spun into something it was not. Clearly, the airline took the man's gluten-free status seriously. They provided a full gluten-free dinner and made sure he did not receive anything with gluten for breakfast. Perhaps the airline can and should do better, but it's disingenuous to pretend that he only got a banana.

 
Carie
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said this on
09 May 2017 7:23:52 AM PST
I had a similar incident in March of this year, when traveling from the US to Italy. Although we had phoned American Airlines weeks in advance and spent more than 30 minutes on the phone to insure our 12-year-old son would have a GF meal, no meal was available on the flight. The Flight Attendant told us it was our fault for not confirming at the ticket counter, and proceeded to give us two "salads" which consisted of only lettuce! This is simply heartbreaking.

 
Claire
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said this on
09 May 2017 7:36:28 AM PST
For celiacs, this is our life. People without celiac just don't understand how hard it is to be expected "to be grateful" for the inequalities that we endure.

 
Jefferson Adams
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said this on
10 May 2017 2:13:04 PM PST
Ten years ago, those inequalities included ZERO gluten-free options on airplanes. Today, they include a full gluten-free dinner and, in this case, a banana. However loudly people want to shout about such an 'injustice,' I see it as a major improvement in the plight of people with celiac disease. The airline clearly fed the man a gluten-free dinner and made sure he didn't get any gluten for breakfast. No, a banana is not a 'meal,' but it's better than no option at all. It is also likely that he could have asked for yogurt, or other items, but ANA will hopefully learn from this.

 
Laura Boggs
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said this on
09 May 2017 8:41:29 AM PST
Clearly ANA paid you to write this article. The banana was an insult to all celiac sufferers. The man paid for an actual meal. Whose advocate are you?

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
09 May 2017 5:07:39 PM PST
ANA did not pay anyone to write anything on this site.

 
Jefferson Adams
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said this on
10 May 2017 12:52:27 PM PST
ANA did not pay anyone to write this article. The facts indicate that the man received a gluten-free meal for dinner. He received a banana for breakfast. The banana has been repeatedly reported as the only food the man received. This is simply not true. Should the man receive a full breakfast? In a perfect world, yes. But when I read the facts of this article, I see an airline attempting to accommodate a passenger's dietary request, perhaps imperfectly. The man asked for, and received, gluten-free food for both meals. News agencies covering this story did their best to hide that fact, and to give the impression that some horrible injustice took place, when what happened seems much more like an inconvenience. Such sloppy reporting does not help people with celiac disease get better treatment or service.

 
Carol Zimmel
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said this on
09 May 2017 9:05:39 AM PST
Okay, so the news story was a bit exaggerated. Nothing unusual there. But the only thing that makes it "not news" is that thus sort of thing happens all the time. It is a real problem, though one many of us have learned to just accept live with. Two meals on a nine hour flight is minimal, and a banana does not constitute a meal. It is ridiculous that they could not come up with something more.

 
Aims
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said this on
09 May 2017 9:33:08 AM PST
And yet - Jefferson Adams used the same headline as his own click bait. Sad.

 
Jefferson Adams
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said this on
10 May 2017 2:22:27 PM PST
The headline is phrased as a question. The answer to my question is likely 'yes.' I don't take issue with the fact that the passenger received a banana for breakfast. If I wanted to go with clickbait, I would have simply repeated other inaccurate headlines, and hidden the fact that he asked for, and received a gluten-free meal. To my knowledge, I'm the only one to clearly point out the fact that the man received a full gluten-free dinner a few hours earlier.

 
Nancy Christine
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said this on
09 May 2017 10:28:03 AM PST
I travel on airlines many times a year, I have celiac disease and order gluten-free meals ahead of time. However, problems do occur and I ALWAYS carry my own food. One should take personal responsibility when you have a condition that may cause diet difficulties. Celiac disease is not that well-known and for the sake of your own well-being, physical and mental, it is really simple to take some of your own food. This should not be the cause of great drama. And I, too, have been offered as little as an apple at times. Now move on.

 
CJ Russell
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said this on
09 May 2017 11:05:03 AM PST
Only a banana? The full breakfast meal consisted of eggs, sausage, mushrooms, bread, and yogurt. They couldn't serve him that without the bread? Unless they were all packaged together, there is no gluten in eggs, sausage, mushrooms, or yogurt. They did a lot better than some flights I've been on, though. Most US airlines don´t have any gluten free options available. I have to make do with what I bring along. Even when I fly first class I have to pick out the offending parts of the meal (eat the salad & meat, but not the potato which was prepackaged with gravy).

 
Jefferson Adams
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said this on
10 May 2017 2:16:58 PM PST
The eggs served in many airline meals contain powdered milk, and often contain traces of wheat. They are packed by the catering company, and are not guaranteed gluten-free. Like you point out: Many US airline offer no gluten-free option. ANA provided a full gluten-free meal, and made sure the passenger was not fed gluten for breakfast. They got the gluten-free part right. I see this as an inconvenience, rather than as some horrible affront to people with celiac disease. I do hope ANA learns from this and improves their gluten-free meal service.

 
Dee
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said this on
09 May 2017 11:50:10 AM PST
Mr. Adams, Sometimes I wonder if you have celiac disease, I want to know, do you? This is the most dismissive article I have seen you pen in a long while. Not being fed a proper breakfast IS a big deal! He may have had dinner, but he ordered meal(s) for the flight. Many CD sufferers have things like diabetes or hypoglycemia, blood sugar dropping can be deadly. He paid for the meals; the airline needs to take responsibility for their mistake and at least apologize. At least he didn't get beaten up and thrown off the flight! You Mr. Adams also owe the people reading this dismissive article an apology as well.

 
Jenn
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said this on
10 May 2017 9:21:33 AM PST
Isn't a huge part of learning to live with celiac advocating for yourself?! The customer had every right to complain! Yes, the British press exaggerated the headlines as they often do. But to receive a banana in the place of a meal, especially one that was likely naturally gluten free besides the bread and possibly the sausage is ridiculous!!! Just a little prior planning and label reading, and they at least could've provided him eggs and yogurt in addition to the banana.

 
Jefferson Adams
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said this on
12 May 2017 9:48:53 AM PST
The scrambled eggs served on many airlines are not gluten-free. Also, there is no evidence that the man asked for anything more than the banana. Had he done so, the flight attendants likely would have sought to accommodate him.

 
Richard James
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said this on
11 May 2017 7:47:52 PM PST
In 2016 I was on 110 domestic flights. I am a Delta Platinum frequent flier, and am upgraded to first class frequently. I have only been fed two gluten free meals on Delta, both consisted of a small bowl of Rice cereal. That is two meals out of literally dozens of meal flights. Most upgrades are at the gate, (~45% of all my flights), and one can hardly expect an airline to have gluten free meals on stand-bye in case a celiac sufferer happens to get upgraded. There have been many cases where I was on first class award travel, confirmed regional upgrades, or occasionally an upgrade a week in advance. I always go to the Delta web site and specify a "special" meal. Result - 2 bowls of Chex. Yesterday I flew Delta from Orlando to Denver on a confirmed regional upgrade that I had used almost a month in advance. The usual resultant circumstance...no "special" meals loaded. I did get a Banana and a Kind bar, but was quite hungry since it was a late afternoon into evening flight. OK, no problem. I always carry protein bars or trail mix in my computer bag just for such instances. Problem is that in this case, there was also a peanut allergy on board, and everything I had contained either peanuts or processed peanuts. The flight attendants were even giving me hints that they either could not, or would not, notice me eating something out of my bag if I chose to. But let's be real folks, I was just hungry, the poor bloke sitting 20 some rows behind me could get seriously ill or seriously dead! Outraged? Hardly. The flight attendants did everything they could for me, including (yet another) a write up to the airline. They usually go out of their way to find fruit, yogurt, etc., as replacement. Why not incensed? I have come to the firm conviction that even though awareness of celiac sufferers has grown significantly over the years, we are still an oddity in most public situations, and MUST take care of our own interest. A hotel and several restaurant meals are attached to each of those 110 flights, and the struggle is not just on airplanes, but if you have a need for gluten free food, you are your own best provider. Making a scene and acting as if we are a helpless, needy group of people only invites scorn and derision, which we then all face regardless of our own personal attitudes. Be patient and kind. Educate cooks, chefs, and wait staff patiently, and if you don´t feel like risking it, provide for yourself with something that won't keep you up 1/2 the night bent over the toilet which is what happens in my case. Making a press release out of only getting a banana on a flight which you have already been fed once is not the same as Rosa Parks getting kicked off a bus. Making a scene and acting as if we are a helpless, needy group of people only invites scorn and derision, which we then all face regardless of our own personal attitudes. Be patient and kind. Educate cooks, chefs, and wait staff patiently, and if you don't feel like risking it, provide for yourself with something that won't keep you up 1/2 the night bent over the toilet, which is what happens in my case. Do everything to provide for your own needs, and be grateful when others cooperate. You will be a lot more at ease with your plight when you can make peace with the situation and concentrate on enjoying life.




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So a big thank you to everyone that's responded. I'll confess I was hoping someone was going to post something along these lines: But no-one did. Instead you've posted some very good, sensible advice which makes a lot of sense to me. I've since read online that trace amounts, such as you...

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Woah, sounds like a rollercoaster for sure. Am i to assume this to be permanent then?

I just wasn't sure if it can be absorbed through cuts and broken skin, and enter the bloodstream. Their bottoms aren't cut and don't have deep wounds, but they get raw and rashy. That's why I was concerned, or at least curious.

I doubt there is any gluten in " oat kernel extract". But the gluten has to get to your small intestines to cause a Celiac reaction. iac rwactio