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I have had chronic hives for years which we're determined to have been caused by celiac. The hives have diminished by at least 90% and I rarely get new ones however, some are lingering and still itch terribly. Is it possible to know how long it might take for itching to stop? I have been gluten free six and a half weeks. Thank you!

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My last bout of chronic hives lasted about six months and was linked to a gluten exposure.    It sounds like you are healing much faster than me!  Keep to the diet.  My allergist prescribed a cocktail of antihistamines which eliminated at least the itching.  
 

Funny though, my allergist blamed my Hashimoto’s.  Some report that it could be a stand-alone autoimmune disorder.  Learn more:

https://www.aocd.org/page/Urticaria


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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17 hours ago, cyclinglady said:

My last bout of chronic hives lasted about six months and was linked to a gluten exposure.    It sounds like you are healing much faster than me!  Keep to the diet.  My allergist prescribed a cocktail of antihistamines which eliminated at least the itching.  
 

Funny though, my allergist blamed my Hashimoto’s.  Some report that it could be a stand-alone autoimmune disorder.  Learn more:

https://www.aocd.org/page/Urticaria

Thank you for taking time to answer me.  I have had chronic hives for nearly 10 years.  They have gotten worse and worse until I had hives on top of hives, severe bruising under there hives and sometimes bleeding under the hives.  For a very short time  last year (8 months) they were fairly mild after my allergist prescribed Allegra 180 but then they flared up worse than ever for months.  My daughter commented to me that she was beginning to itch around her ankles after she completed the Healthy 30 and reintroduced gluten.  That's why I went gluten free but I was so shocked when my digestive and intestinal problems began clearing up also.  Well, that's a lot, isn't it?  I just need to give it more time, I believe.  And from what I've been reading, they may never fully clear up because that's the nature of autoimmune issues.  Again, thank you!

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Autoimmune Disorders fall under the umbrella of Hypersensitivity.  Celiac disease is under type 4.  You can have issues with several hypersensitivity  types (like an IgE Type 1 allergy to cats).  You can learn more here:

https://www.amboss.com/us/knowledge/Hypersensitivity_reactions
 

What I am trying to say is that all of these types are linked.  If one flares up or is activated, it can impact other types.  For example, once allergy season hits, my nut and horse allergy becomes worse.  If my celiac disease is activated, it triggers my hives.  I still get hives today, though they are mild and often appear when I am exposed to say, a bug bite (1 mosquito bite causes almost 100 hives around the bite).  I swell up and get hives all over my body from many medications.  It is way worse if I am also dealing with active celiac disease.  But my everyday-starting-at 4:00 pm-hives (beginning with a tummy ache, an itchy head and a cascade of eruptions down to me feet), has finally resolved.  Prevention?  No gluten!   

 As a kid and up until just recently, I was allergic to the cold.  Yep.  Swelling and hives from cold water, air or snow.  Made it hard to ski, but I did it.  That seems to resolve with healing based on my last ice cube test. Calming down all my autoimmune and avoiding my triggers is key.  
 

Google Mast Cell Activation Syndrome for other “allergy type” explanations.  

A gluten free diet just might do the trick for your hives too.    But keep at it.  It takes time.  Avoid your known triggers and try to identify new ones.  

If you have kids, consider getting them tested, especially if symptoms warrant and before they go gluten free.  Celiac disease is systemic, genetic and co-exists with other autoimmune disorders.  
 

Good Luck!  

 

Edited by cyclinglady

Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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