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Celia the Celiac

Upper Left Quadrant Pain

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Can anybody tell me what in the world would be causing this? I've been having this pain for two weeks now.


Diagnosed in September 2005. Gluten Free since April 2006

Deputy Clerk-Electronic Filing Manager in Civil Department

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There are numerous conditions that could cause pain in that area. I have enclosed some links you may find of interest. A visit to the doctor would be wise because part of the diagnostic process for abdominal pain is: the exam, listening for bowel sounds, character of the pain etc.

http://www.nethealthbook.com/gastrointesti...ominalpain.html

lists various causes ofr abdominal pain based on quadrant, then has links for the problem

How is the cause of abdominal pain diagnosed?

Doctors determine the cause of abdominal pain by relying on

1) characteristics of the pain,

2) findings on physical examination,

3) laboratory, radiological, and endoscopic testing, and surgery.

4) Characteristics of the pain

The following information, obtained by taking a patient's history, is important in helping doctors determine the cause of pain:

The way the pain begins. For example, abdominal pain that comes on suddenly suggests a sudden event, for example, the interruption of the supply of blood to the colon (ischemia) or obstruction of the bile duct by a gallstone (biliary colic).

The location of the pain. Appendicitis typically causes pain in the right lower abdomen, the usual location of the appendix. Diverticulitis typically causes pain in the left lower abdomen where most colonic diverticuli are located. Pain from the gallbladder (biliary colic or cholecystitis) typically is felt in the right upper abdomen where the gallbladder is located.

The pattern of the pain. Obstruction of the intestine initially causes waves of crampy abdominal pain due to contractions of the intestinal muscles and distention of the intestine. Obstruction of the bile ducts by gallstones typically causes steady (constant) upper abdominal pain that lasts between 30 minutes and several hours.

Acute pancreatitis typically causes severe, unrelenting, steady pain in the upper abdomen and upper back.

The pain of acute appendicitis initially may start near the umbilicus, but as the inflammation progresses, the pain moves to the right lower abdomen.

The character of pain may change over time. For example, obstruction of the bile ducts sometimes progresses to inflammation of the gallbladder with or without infection (acute cholecystitis). When this happens, the characteristics of the pain change to those of inflammatory pain. (See below.)

The duration of the pain. The pain of IBS typically waxes and wanes over months or years and may last for decades. Biliary colic lasts no more than several hours. The pain of pancreatitis lasts one or more days.

What makes the pain worse. Pain due to inflammation (appendicitis, diverticulitis, cholecystitis, pancreatitis) typically is aggravated by sneezing, coughing or any jarring motion. Patients with inflammation as the cause of their pain prefer to lie still.

What relieves the pain. The pain of IBS and constipation often is relieved temporarily by bowel movements. Pain due to obstruction of the stomach or upper small intestine may be relieved temporarily by vomiting which reduces the distention that is caused by the obstruction. Eating or taking antacids may temporarily relieve the pain of ulcers of the stomach or duodenum because both food and antacids neutralize (counter) the acid that is responsible for irritating the ulcers and causing the pain.

Associated signs and symptoms. The presence of fever suggests inflammation. Diarrhea or rectal bleeding suggests an intestinal cause of the pain. The presence of fever and diarrhea suggest inflammation of the intestines that may be infectious or non-infectious (ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease).

http://www.medicinenet.com/abdominal_pain/page2.htm


Sandy

Type 1 diabetes - 1986

hypothyroid -1993

pernicious anemia

premature atrial beats

neuropathy

retinopathy

daughter is: age 15

central hypotonia and developmental delay

balance issues (rides an adult 3 wheel bike)

hypothyroid 1996

dermatographia - a form of angioedema 2002

celiac 2004 - by endoscopy

diagnosed Aspergers at age 7 - responded very well (HUGE difference) to gluten-free diet

recovered from Kawasaki (2003)

lactose intolerant - figured out in Oct/06

Gilberts syndrome (April/07)

allergy to stinging insects

scoliosis Jan 2008

nightshade intolerance - figured out April 2008

allergy to Sulfa antibiotics

son is 13

type 1 diabetic - 2003 diagnosed on his 9th birthday

celiac - 2004 by endoscopy

lactose intolerant - figured out Nov/06

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